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I recently purchased an 11 yr old Thoroughbred mare who was taken off the track at 5yrs old and has been a broodmare since then. She is an amazing horse and has no issues, except one! when I try and ride her out of the ring she bolts and im unsure why? wondering if anyone could help me with this?
 

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IME with ottbs that havent been properly retrained off the track they can tend to think everything is about GO GO GO :) in a smaller environment this isnt possible but once out in the open they feel the need to do the only thing they know what to do which is run.

how is she with listening to your commands for whoa in the ring?

i would start by lunging her out of the arena in an open space. work on getting her head set low and getting her relaxed with working outside the arena while understanding that she doesnt have to be going a hundred miles an hour all the time. lunge work is a great took with ottb's as it allows you to work through problems on the ground before continuing under saddle. work on voice commands as well. everything you do accompany it with a voice command. make it the same thing every time and use it without fail every time. voice commands are very helpful with ottb's i have found.

there is a book called 'beyond the track by anna morgan ford' and it is a great tool for learning how to combat many problems commonly associated with ottb's.
 

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Ohhh gosh... I know what your dealing with! I used to own a retired racehorse (About 10 years old) & she did so amazing in the round pen but out on the trail or in the feild all she wanted to do was GO!
Here are some things that helped me & my thoroughbred:
I highly suggest that you relax yourself completely while in the saddle. Try not to lean forward while riding her because that is how the jockeys ride & she knows that means run. Sit as deep as you can & really relax yourself. Remember, your horse can feel every move your make. If your tense, she'll be tense. If your calm, she'll be calm. She is looking to you for guidance & it is your job to show her the right way.
I do suggest working on your "whoa" cue. While in the arena, work on walking directly towards a fence & once u approach it, sit deep, say "whoa", & add rein pressure. Do this at all three gaits (Make sure your good at it at the walk before you go to the trot, then canter.).
While your outside the arena & have practiced the things above: Relax yourself to relax your horse. Also, when she goes into the canter without your cue, slow her down to a stop, back up, and continue on in the pace YOU want to go. If she canters again... repeat.
Consistancy. Consistancy. Consistancy.
Good luck. :wink:
 

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Thank you both so much I will definately try the things mentioned. I do alot of lunge work with her and she is good with some of the commands: walk, trot, canter but not whoa, so I will try to work on that with her. The last thing I need is for me or her to get hurt!
 

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Why does everyone lung a horse for every problem?? She rides well in the ring and only when you are taking her OUT of the ring she has a problem. Is lunging going to help her?? Can't you work on her Whoa from the back , in the ring??
I deal with run aways, horse that don't stop, horses that run full out across a field until you bail off or risk running into a fence. Should I suggest to the person to lung the horse, teach it what Whoa means??/
Or do I just put a good western bite, one that any reining horse uses every day performing his wonderful manuvers in the ring, let the horse run and when I yell WHOA shut him down hard and fast, release all pressure when he stops, point him in a new direction , kick him into another run, yell WHOA and pull him up hard and fast.
I beleive in riding out a problem. If the horse bolts leaving the ring then I would bite the horse up and when she bolts pull her up hard and fast.

It deals with the problem, doesn't pussy foot around it. It is over in a matter of minutes.

Here agian I am assuming the person can ride???
 

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Well now my bolting problem has tuned into a mounting and bolting problem? why is my 11 yr old mare acting like a 2 yr old? today i tried many times unsuccesfully to mount up and everytime I put my foot into the stirup she moves in a different direction away from me? i finnally managed to get up on her and she was fine what is all this about? ?? My horse has been perfectly fine over the last little while and had know isues its like all her training has been reversed and she is a baby again? has anyone had this happen to them?
 

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I don't know if this will work in your situation, but whenever she moves away from you step off and make her back up. Do so sort of aggressively. Not like, screaming, but make sure she knows you're serious and you mean business. You could also try making her move sideways after, just to get the point. Maybe even, just quickly, go back to the old respect method by forcing her out of your space and keeping her out until you say so (->this just seems to work whenever my mare misbehaves-if not a smack. It's just a little wake-up call that reminds her: Oh, hey, ok you're in charge). I do agree that if you have a problem in the saddle (the bolting) fix it in the saddle. Obviously make sure she knows how to whoa, but I don't think lunging will help.
 

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agree with ilytango, about the backing up method, and some of the above posters.

I do want to suggest, that when on the lunge, my OTTB, didn't resond to well to the 'whoa' when i had a lunge rope in my hand, so i decided to drop the whip, and try another method that english rider's use (which i am) i purred, to make him stop, he quickly changed transition's and went to a stop and joined up with me.

It is worth a try..
 

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jeesh, kinda funny. have a thread of my own that's got some of the same sort of stuff, sort of. however, i've got a suggestion or two.

when mounting, i've been taught, especially when in a snaffle, to pull their head around in toward you like you're flexing them. the OTTB that i'm working on right now had the same problem. i could NOT get on him. friend suggested i go back to pulling him around. i stick glued to his side next to the saddle and pull his head around. when he stops, i'll get a foot in the stirrup and he'll start turning again but doesn't take long to get him to stop again. usually. it might take ten minutes to get on but that's ok.

he tends to be ok when we ride, pasture or on the road until i let him open up any. another thread recently made me remember ya don't want to have CONSTANT pressure on the bit so we're working to keep a looser reign while not getting out of control. problem there is if he opens up to more than a SLOW lope he wants it ALL, and i have a helluva time stopping him again. and he sinks into the bit HARD. his mouth was rubbed raw today, and he has a wear spot on his nose from the hackamore (other than that, he responds well to the hack).



Why does everyone lung a horse for every problem?? She rides well in the ring and only when you are taking her OUT of the ring she has a problem. Is lunging going to help her?? Can't you work on her Whoa from the back , in the ring??
I deal with run aways, horse that don't stop, horses that run full out across a field until you bail off or risk running into a fence. Should I suggest to the person to lung the horse, teach it what Whoa means??/
Or do I just put a good western bite, one that any reining horse uses every day performing his wonderful manuvers in the ring, let the horse run and when I yell WHOA shut him down hard and fast, release all pressure when he stops, point him in a new direction , kick him into another run, yell WHOA and pull him up hard and fast.
I beleive in riding out a problem. If the horse bolts leaving the ring then I would bite the horse up and when she bolts pull her up hard and fast.

It deals with the problem, doesn't pussy foot around it. It is over in a matter of minutes.

Here agian I am assuming the person can ride???
sir, this is why my brother said to have my wife STOP lunging her horse. i ride him now instead. but are you suggesting putting something like a curb on him and letting him run and shut 'er down in fast fashion? because we can do that, too. only other question is how fast do i let 'im go before putting on the brakes?
 

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i have found that when u work with a horse off the track u need to baisically retrain them i suggest clinton andersons ground work routine (clinton andersons downunder horsemanship(book)) it takes about a month but is well worth it i did this with a friends thuroubred that she bought staright from the track and she could not control the mare and couldnt mount without help and if u can get in the saddle take her somewhere she loves to run and make her stand in one spot for about ten min the move do this several times a day everyday and she will start to relax, walk slow and stand still while you mount another problem i found is if the girth is too tight or not tight enough she will try to keep you off her back
 

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also if your feed contains alot of barly this could contribute to the problem as barly is a hot feed and releases energy for hours
 

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sir, this is why my brother said to have my wife STOP lunging her horse. i ride him now instead. but are you suggesting putting something like a curb on him and letting him run and shut 'er down in fast fashion? because we can do that, too. only other question is how fast do i let 'im go before putting on the brakes?
Yes I am suggesting a curb. I see nothing wrong with a curb and 50% of the horses ride in them all the time.
You do not have to let the horse bolt. Just be ready for that first jump and then hit hard. I assume as you leave the ring the horse suddenly jumps forward, bolting?? The first jump the horse makes shut him down hard, as the lung pull back harshly yell NO in a loud angry voice and then release all pressure.
The horse will catch on quickly that you will not tolerate this bolt and after a few sessions you can go back to whatever bit you were using in the first place.,
In this case do NOT let the horse just run, correct it immediatley.

Just to be absolutely clear. I would get a tom thumb, which is a jointed mouth piece with curb shanks. Use a curb chain and do it fairly tight. Then ride the horse as normal in the arena getting both of you use to the curb and when you feel confident in it and you will find it gives alot more control. When you feel confident get someone to open the arena gate/door and ride out as usual. At the first jump pull back hard while yelling NO and shut the horse down fast and then release all pressure, take a little walk around outside, ride back into the arena, a few rounds in the arena and then again ride outside being prepared. If the horse doesn't bolt this time ride a bit outside, praising the horse , keeping the hands gentle.
This will break the horse of the bolting habit quickly. Once the horse knows you are in command they give up the nonsense.
 

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also if your feed contains alot of barly this could contribute to the problem as barly is a hot feed and releases energy for hours
Do horse feeds contain barley?? It is not grown alot where I live. Corn is grown and used in horse feed. While corn is considered a hot feed it actually helps a horse run cooler then oats.
 

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The first jump the horse makes shut him down hard, as the lung pull back harshly yell NO in a loud angry voice and then release all pressure.
The horse will catch on quickly that you will not tolerate this bolt and after a few sessions you can go back to whatever bit you were using in the first place.,
In this case do NOT let the horse just run, correct it immediatley.

Just wondering, what would you suggest when the horse starts bolting through a leverage/curb bit? Longer shanks perhaps? :-|
 

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Just wondering, what would you suggest when the horse starts bolting through a leverage/curb bit? Longer shanks perhaps? :-|
I have never had a horse run through a bit but I know it happens. That is why people ask me to ride a problem horse. But I find most of those people with the problems insist on using a snaffle?? They would even sell their beloved pet before they would put in a curb??
Why do they have this mentality??
I take your question as sarcasm??
Do you have that much experience that you see a problem??
A person use to riding a horse in a snaffle will suddenly find they have far more control in even a simple tom thumb.
If you have a problem with even trying a simple curb then don't. Keep your problem or sell the horse.
I may be old, I may be narrow minded but I am not afraid to try .
 

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I have never had a horse run through a bit but I know it happens. That is why people ask me to ride a problem horse. But I find most of those people with the problems insist on using a snaffle?? They would even sell their beloved pet before they would put in a curb??
Why do they have this mentality??
I take your question as sarcasm??
Do you have that much experience that you see a problem??
A person use to riding a horse in a snaffle will suddenly find they have far more control in even a simple tom thumb.
If you have a problem with even trying a simple curb then don't. Keep your problem or sell the horse.
I may be old, I may be narrow minded but I am not afraid to try .
No, no sarcasm at all.
I was just wondering what you would do is all.
 

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No, no sarcasm at all.
I was just wondering what you would do is all.
I have never had it happen. I ride all the time with soft hands, no contact. I ride with my legs, my voice and a suggestiion with HEAVY reins. I hate light weight reins. I feel heavy reins signal you intent before you actually take up the slack. For neck reining the horse feels a heavy rein easier. For direct reining the simple act of moving the directing hand signals the horse. So I will use nothing but 3/4 inch reins.
While I can ride bitless, snaffle or anything else I ride alot with a curb, a tom thumb at that.
I recently switched to a Billy allen pelham and switch back and forth from snaffle to curb depending on the conditions I am riding in and the horse energy level.
Too often I have seen people who insist on nothing but a snaffle end up selling the horse because they couldn't handle the horse, it ran all over them. My suggest is TRY a curb, a tom thumb and just see if it helps.
I do not see a problem with trying something new, something with more stop to it. Keep your hands gentle but have something that you can use if the horse acts up.
A cheap Tom thumb is only about $30. A cheap experiment.
Even run aways I have never had one run through a bit, a curb bit that is.
For the ultimate run away, use your back, your legs and a good pair of reins, Yell WHOA and then use everything you got to haul the horse down as violently as you can. Repeat the run, again WHOA and hit the horse with everything you have. You won't need to do it a 3rd time.
Again this is not for the poster but for the extreme run away.
 

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RiosDad, i like your methods. simple for my simple mind to comprehend. i've actually ridden him a couple times in a regular curb, but it didn't seem to make much difference, however i'm trying new things a lot. hopefully this works better than some other stuff.

we don't have an arena/round pen, mostly just open. where we live has about 8 acres to it with a couple ponds and about a half mile to the main road and 200 acres or so to work with (more, but i have to open gates to access it), as well as however many miles of road i wish.

i've been trying to ride him with a looser reign so there's not that constant, heavy pressure on his mouth and when he tries to pick up a trot/lope from a walk without a cue from me i've just slowed him back down to a walk. that's where you're idea will come in the best.

another question on that. if we're riding faster than a walk, say trotting and he decides he wants to lope without additional cues from me, will the same concept work for that as well? shut him down fast and then try again? i took him out for a nice jaunt yesterday (about 8 miles total), and he's not bad trotting along (i can actually trot this horse nicely, he's the one who taught me to post. last week.), but he likes to speed up. i had him loping for a while and given much reign at all he wants to gallop his little heart out. i hauled his *** hard enough that his mouth was pretty sore when we got home.
 

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You know, everybody has their own method of what should be done. I would never critisize someones method. If it works/worked for them, let them share that information with us without feeling they are wrong. It is up to the person with the question to make the decision if they want to take the help or not. This is a huge pet peeve of mine. Make sure the horse is used to the bit he/she was using. Any tack can be a factor. The other thing I agree with is to do the one rein stop. Even when getting on your horse, pull the face toward you until he/she stops moving and then get on. Maybe when you take your horse out of the ring, as soon as you feel her want to bolt, pull her head to one side and make her feet move both ways then start out again. Each time she wants to bolt pull her head in and make her move. Being a racehorse, used to go,go,go, this may take her sometime to want to slow down. If you stay consistent she will eventually learn not to bolt. But it will take time. Be patient. Good Luck. And those of you that want to critisize how someone finds a way to help, please don't shut them down. What works for you is great, and what works for them is fine too.
 

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I would never suggest a harsh bit, I would stay with the snaffle until he gets what you're asking. All you will do by riding him in a harsh bit/curb bit is frustrate him.

I would invest in a trainer if you want to commit to this horse, it doesn't seem like you know how to handle the situation which could turn into something more dangerous.

"tries to pick up a trot/lope from a walk without a cue from me"
Are you sure you're being confident and clear when you're asking?

"i hauled his *** hard enough that his mouth was pretty sore when we got home."
I REALLY hope I read this wrong.
 
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