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Boots?

1218 Views 14 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  Angel M.
Hello! I've been using these Durango boots for a while and absolutely loved them. They lasted about a year before they started giving me issues. The first problem was that the in-sole lining on the bottom had a very hard piece at the heel, and I guess after putting them on/taking them off so many times the heel piece bent forward, so I was stepping on it all the time and it was super annoying having it under my foot all the time. Pulling it up did nothing because it just bent back forward when I put the boot back on. If that makes sense.

Second, now the lining on the inside of the shaft is deteriorating, and I can hardly take my boots off because it catches on my heel every. Single. Time. I'm using these boots for riding, working, working, and working. For the amount of abuse I've put them through, the outside looks okay, but after only a year the inside shouldn't be so bad I feel like. I think it would be good to add that at this point the lining is giving me blisters on my heels and I NEED new boots.

So, I was wondering what everyone suggests. I usually wear bootcut jeans, so boots like Dublins probably wouldn't work so well. I would prefer for them to be somewhat nice enough to wear outside the barn but it's not a must. I need something that can take being in all types of weather, being worn everyday, and good enough to ride in. Also the deteriorating of the inside of the boot isn't because it's too small, these boots are about a size and a half too large lol... I didn't take into account that leather boots stretch. I don't really want to pay more than about $200 seeing as my Durango's didn't last as long as I expected. Any suggestions? (Would prefer in person stores so I can try them on) Thanks!

ETA: They also must be comfortable! 馃槈 they鈥檒l be in a lot of muddy situations, and they鈥檒l just be worn in general a LOT. Also a shaft is a must, no hiking boots. So I guess a more western type boot. Let me know what worked for you and what brands/styles to avoid. Also I鈥檓 not trying to hate on Durango because I loved them while they lasted, I just need something with a little more life in them. Thanks again!
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Durango has replacement insoles. I'd call and ask about why yours are doing what they are going and try a pair of the replacements.
Off topic question: what鈥檚 everyone鈥檚 opinions on steel toed boots for working around horses? I looked into them when I first got into the industry but there was a controversy. Some people said that they鈥檙e great and keep your digits safe, but a lot of people claimed that the horse could bend the steel, trapping your toes inside and possibly cutting them. These people advised highly against them. I don鈥檛 think I鈥檒l get any because the normal boots work just fine even when st鈦竐pped on lol. I was just wondering what others think. Have a fantastic day!
This is a myth. Or let's say it's a you get what you pay for. Steel toe boots intended for work conditions where accidents involving significant psi, high drops and heavy weights are safety rated and have certifications. That's what you look for. My husband had a greater than 70 foot pine slip off a stump and onto his foot. Without that cap he'd have lost his foot. Was he injured and did he have a long rehab? Yes. Did the cap cut off his toes? No. My child had a UTV flip and land across his foot (sideways foot placement). The steel toe held the weight. Was his foot injured? Yes. Did he lose digits? No. No steel toe and that foot and lower leg would have been crushed. I've worn steel toes around drafts for over 30 years. Had one that if you weren't on it would purposefully step on you. No problems. I can say had I not had them there would have been lots of broken toes with that one. There are other times where a horse stomped and I wasn't quick enough or feet were just wrong place wrong time and not paying attention to feet as I was watching body or face/ears. No steel toe would have meant serious injury.

You have to evaluate your working conditions and what you do in your boots. I spent hours a day working horses from the ground and hitching/unhitching. My feet spent a lot of time in close proximity to those big feet. Small feet can actually cause as much or more damage because of smaller size.
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