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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As anyone on here ever broke a cow to ride? I have a heifer how is too small to breed but is big enough to ride or even pull a cart. She will most likely never be bred. She is very friendly even likes to play with me and is easy to catch. I have put a halter on her i can just walk right up to her and put it on. But that’s as far as i’ve gotten. She really like food so i think i may be able to do it with R+ but i have zero experience with breaking cows/steers. She is about 850-1,000lbs but is short. Her half sister is also very small. They are the result of a new bull so we aren’t sure why they are small. physically she seems fine and it’s not dwarfism so riding/breaking her shouldn’t affect her.
 

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How old is your heifer?
Yes, I did ride our family milk cow. I was in between horses, so figured one day, after milking, I'd give it a go. She was great. Like your heifer, she was very tame, liked people.
If she's 850 to 1000, she's plenty big to breed. What breed is she? Choose a bull with a small birthweight for her first. She should do fine after that.
When I say I rode our family milk cow, I'm talking saddle, bridle, the whole shebang.
 

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Gracie, Lily, Chewy, Sam, Jack and Bill
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I second zimalia22 about your heifer. Her weight sounds just fine to breed…just make sure to use whats called a “heifer bull”…. A bull that is used on first calf heifers that is known for producing low birth weight calves. Also, depending on breed, she may be a smaller breed in general… there are Aberdeen or Lowline Angus, Dexter, Galloway….basically a long list of “mini” breeds of cattle.

As for riding, I grew up showing registered Angus cattle and also showing 4-H Steers. I never used a saddle or did anything elaborate, but because they were so tame, I’d start by sitting on their backs when they were laying down. Once they were comfortable with that, I stayed there until they stood up. Eventually I rode them bareback with a halter. Again, nothing fancy, but I enjoyed it and loved the bond. I still have cows I could sit on and or ride, but I don’t bounce like I used to, so it’s just love and goodies for them these days!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So i put that weight because when i was looking into this i saw a cow that looked around her size (at least i thought so) and it was listed as 1000lbs but i just came in and she is much smaller than i thought. Maybe around 750lbs if that. She is an Black angus except she is not black. Both her her parents are full blooded angus but she came out cream with red paint like markings. She is 2-1/2 years old, this fall she’ll be 3. I was actually able to go and halter her up and lead (practically drag) her around. I have her some treats and she made it a little easier. She can be pushy sometimes when it comes with food so i don’t carry it around with me unless im feeding her. I do keep a pig whip on me the keep her from pushing me around, literally pushing me around. Im not technically her owner, it’s my sisters boyfriend since he bought her but i am the one that cares for her most of the time. He lets her push him around and she will pick him up with her head and he just laughs and lets her do it. When im out there tho i don’t.
 

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Gracie, Lily, Chewy, Sam, Jack and Bill
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Angus are either red or black…. If she’s cream with streaks, she’s not full angus, especially at her size. She is most likely an angus cross of some sort…pictures may help.

I’m glad you carry something with you to discourage her from playing rough…I’d be having a serious talk with the BF though. Even a smaller size bovine can kill or seriously maim you …. to them it’s playing… your body will not win. If he continues on as he does, I would walk away from the situation as it’s a recipe for disaster. She needs boundaries. You wouldn’t let a horse push you around…do not let a cow do it.
 

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Many many years ago, the daughter of a dairy farmer down the road from my grandmother’s dairy farm wanted a horse. Her parents said they weren’t spending money on a hay burner, so she broke one of the younger dairy cows to ride.

For most of that summer, she rode it up and down the road until one day a horse showed up in the pasture👍😎👍😎
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dog Dog breed Working animal Liver Carnivore
here is a picture. That is a great dane standing next to her. And now that i see this i realize that i was way off with the weight at the beginning. I wouldn’t say she is striped but like a paint horse. This picture was taken about 3 months ago and she has grown a little bit but not much. Mostly putting on weight.
 

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As anyone on here ever broke a cow to ride? I have a heifer how is too small to breed but is big enough to ride or even pull a cart. She will most likely never be bred. She is very friendly even likes to play with me and is easy to catch. I have put a halter on her i can just walk right up to her and put it on. But that’s as far as i’ve gotten. She really like food so i think i may be able to do it with R+ but i have zero experience with breaking cows/steers. She is about 850-1,000lbs but is short. Her half sister is also very small. They are the result of a new bull so we aren’t sure why they are small. physically she seems fine and it’s not dwarfism so riding/breaking her shouldn’t affect her.

Dog Dog breed Carnivore Working animal Liver


here is a picture. That is a great dane standing next to her. And now that i see this i realize that i was way off with the weight at the beginning. I wouldn’t say she is striped but like a paint horse. This picture was taken about 3 months ago and she has grown a little bit but not much. Mostly putting on weight.
Way too small for anything but a small child to ride. I'd doubt she's even 500 pounds. Doesn't look mature. I'd have guessed under 2. Her hooves need attention. Not full Angus. I'd say not Angus. Likely a cross of some sort though.
 

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View attachment 1132967 here is a picture. That is a great dane standing next to her. And now that i see this i realize that i was way off with the weight at the beginning. I wouldn’t say she is striped but like a paint horse. This picture was taken about 3 months ago and she has grown a little bit but not much. Mostly putting on weight.
She looks like a Belted Galloway cross imo, we have a couple that look just like her except they are black. Ours have stayed pretty small compared to our other "nicer" cows, but they have filled out. Definitely a Galloway cross.
 

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Belted don't have white legs. They have a white ring encircling the body at some point. Width varies but it doesn't include the legs. The cows weigh around 1000 pounds. So cross with something smaller and more white.

In the U.S. red and black Angus are in separate breed registries. Red is recessive so it would be possible to have an Ee cow and Ee bull. Not going to have white though. A very small, thin strip on the ventral line is possible but it can't extend past the navel and is not something a breeder wants to see.
 

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This calf looks like a cross of a few different breeds just a mixer of who knows what. There would be no way that I would let somebody get on her shes just way to small, now pulling a small cart she could do that, but on the riding as of now, nope!!!
We have a few Belted Galloway crosses up the road from us and they are super thick like these that I posted, I dont see any B G in this calf at all. She dont even have the built of one. These pictures are off the internet just showing how thick built a Galloway is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah i know. we got her because she was the one cow that stood out. She is from a family friend so i’ve seen the herd multiple times and it is a black angus herd. She is the result of a new bull but visibly he is black angus and so is her mom. When i saw her i asked what breed she was because i thought she was maybe half galloway but there is no visible galloways in the herd. I’m not really concerned with her breed.
I mostly plan on her to just be able to pull a cart or have a kid sit in her just for fun. Right now i just want her to be friendly but not pushy.
 

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Belted don't have white legs. They have a white ring encircling the body at some point. Width varies but it doesn't include the legs. The cows weigh around 1000 pounds. So cross with something smaller and more white.

In the U.S. red and black Angus are in separate breed registries. Red is recessive so it would be possible to have an Ee cow and Ee bull. Not going to have white though. A very small, thin strip on the ventral line is possible but it can't extend past the navel and is not something a breeder wants to see.
A Galloway cross can be about any color, markings don't matter in crosses from my experience
 

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This calf looks like a cross of a few different breeds just a mixer of who knows what. There would be no way that I would let somebody get on her shes just way to small, now pulling a small cart she could do that, but on the riding as of now, nope!!!
We have a few Belted Galloway crosses up the road from us and they are super thick like these that I posted, I dont see any B G in this calf at all. She dont even have the built of one. These pictures are off the internet just showing how thick built a Galloway is.
She is young and definitely not as "fancy" as the listed pictures and there is nothing wrong with that. Plus crosses can have completely different builds compared to a purebred.
 

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That calf needs to grow up a bunch before you do anything with her. She's way too small and young to think of riding.
She appears to be a belted galloway cross. She is in no way the weight you said. That's the size of a weaner.
Let her grow.
 
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She looks like a Belted Galloway cross imo, we have a couple that look just like her except they are black. Ours have stayed pretty small compared to our other "nicer" cows, but they have filled out. Definitely a Galloway cross.
Would love to see pictures of your Belted Galloway crosses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I know that the weight was way off. Idk what i was thinking. I was told that he is close to being done growing. She isn’t a weanling she is 2-1/2 years old. Almost 3. I probably will start to mess with her as in halter breaking and just plain manners. She probably won’t gotten ridden. may pull a cart tho. Yes she is small but is mature. I’ll probably treat her similar to my mini.

I know her old owner personally and she is a good family friend so it’s not like we got scammed we bought her after seeing her and waited until she was going to be sent to auction. She has two full sibling one that is 1 year younger and one that is 2 years younger. They are both black and at the weight they should be for their age.

When and if she ever gets bigger i may try to break her to ride but if she stays small she may just be a pet and pull a cart every once in awhile.
 
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