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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, my wife and I are both western riders, and she recently got thrown from her horse and broke her arm, pinky and T5 vertebrae trying to break a new horse we had. And it got us both thinking, we know in western riding there are saddles that hold a person very securely to break a horse, but how is it that english style riders break a horse? It seems to us that it is hard enough to stay in an english saddle on a calm horse, how would you break a horse in one? Nothing against english riding, just curious as to how ya'll do it, thanx
 

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If an English saddle is all you know it's not as hard to stay on. :wink:

I do quite a bit of groundwork (lunging, long lining, bombproofing, etc) before I climb on the back of something for the first time. Usually by then it's not a huge deal. I think western saddles are so bulky and uncomfortable I don't think I would feel secure enough to want to break something! To each their own...
 

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i broke my mare english [in a jumping saddle also] !

i can ride western, but im horrible at it & the saddle is so uncomfortable for me. i could never break a horse western, i would probably fall off way easier. i agree, what ever you are most used to will be easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I understand that it depends on what type of saddle you generally use, my question was more of how do you stay on? Most horses will buck the first few times that you get on, and with a western saddle atleast you have the high cantle coupled with the high front pommel, as well as the front and back cinches, and as far as weight, most western saddles are between 30-40 pounds and help to tire the horse out and calm him/her down quicker. Just seems to me that the light weight of an english saddle and the lack of ANYTHING to hold you in or to hold onto would make it very hard to stay on a horse that is bucking, just curious what ya'lls technique is?
 

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you hang on with your legs !

i usually sack them out a lot too. ive given a few horses there first ride & even more their 10th or so ride & they dont normally buck
 

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A steady, smooth transition into under saddle work combined with a rider with solid position and a calm, leading disposition.
 

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haha i find it easier to stay on in a english saddle......... but im sure if i grew up riding western i would find it easier to ride western :D
 

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I grew up western and english. I would MUCH rather ride a rough horse in an english saddle. Western saddles just don't have a good enough "feel" to know what is about to happen. Let's face it, jumping saddles are balanced and designed to move with a jumping horse. There's not a whole lot of difference between a jump and most bucks. If there is a twist in there, I can reach down and grab the pommel just fine.
 

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I've broken/trained..or whatever you want to call it, a few horses. None of them have ever bucked on me. Maybe I've just been lucky??
 

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I 100% agree with Allison :)

I find western saddles so terribly uncomfortable, I think it is their width that bothers me so much.

I have started horses that threw a fit and never had any issue staying on. In an english saddle I find it very easy to feel a horses movement, even the bunching of muscle to anticipate and follow what they are going to do.

But I have never been a fan of riding a horse till it's dog tired and "breaking them". When I got on Aidan for the first time I had well over 2 1/2 years of time with him on the ground. He didn't lift one leg in protest (much to my surprise). He has bucked I think maybe twice in his entire time under saddle...once cuz he was just full of himself on a crisp day and the other cuz he got a cut on his foot I didn't know about and was protesting from pain.
 

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I know that may sound silly, but I backed both my horses bareback for the first 3 or 4 days, then I put a saddle on. Somehow I felt more safe bareback if they'd decide to buck. :wink:

I ride in both saddles - western and english, and with english on I feel the movements (and when the buck is coming) much better. However I still think western is more safe for those extra bad situations. But it's just my opinion.
 

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They make an itty bitty piece of leather called a bucking strap that you can attach to your launching pad, I mean english saddle, to help you stay on the more fractious horses. After that, full seat breeches or synthetic saddles help you stay put far better than leather. With english, it's all about balance.
 

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i ride/train both english and western and i can sit bucks/spooks in both english and western.if your in english hold on with your legs and if the horse does but LEAN back try not to lean forward thats how you fall off, and i usually turn them in a circle just as a mental punishment and i think its easyier to sit when there going in a circle. and my western saddle is close contact so i like my western saddle ALOT and it's got an extra deep seat to help my position :) but i have a killer seat anyways :)
 

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Exactly what Allison said. What is a big jump anyways? A rear and a buck if you think about it! English riders stay on using their legs and balance, but it's important for me to also feel what's going on under me so I can try and stop the buck before it happens. I actually very rarely have a horse buck when I first get on (like I said, tons of groundwork!). I find it more common when they learning how to canter.
 
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