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Well we found out that my main show horse has some health issues and that I need to start working with a new horse. Her owner has an older gelding that he is going to break, and I might want to train for my next show horse.

Rockin' Spats aka Spat is a 12 year old, Thoroughbred, gelding. I've known him for many many years. He only knows how to lead, load into a stock trailer, and be lunged. It is a huge fight to trim him, but then again he hasn't been trimmed much in his life, just been a pasture horse. He is NOT a hot headed Thoroughbred, really relaxed, not spooky. Doesn't kick, bite, etc...

I trained my current show horse which is a Thoroughbred as a very successful halter, western pleasure, english pleasure, gaming, sorting, goat tying, and trail horse. I prefer Thoroughbreds over every other breed, I have broke one horse before who I showed once but we just did not click at all and she wanted to just be a pleasure horse, when I would like an all around horse.

Your experience with breaking older horses?

Of course here are some pics of him.. Many people don't believe me that he is a reg. Thoroughbred.
 

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Do what you can be successful at. Draw from your past experiences good and bad, and work on being ready to learn what a horse like this has to teach.

It is a huge fight to trim him
Get this part good and you will reap great rewards in every other area. The secret to getting one good about their feet is to 'give it back before he needs it back'. Even if that's only a half-second at first. And remember that to stand balanced and give you a foot they have to be balanced on the other three first. It literally shouldn't take more than your thumb and two fingers to hold a foot up, when it's good. That's not an exaggeration.

You sound like you have some skills and experience and that will serve you well. Just remember to listen and learn. A horse like this will make you wise, if you let him.
 

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don't think of him as an older horse that you're training. just think of him as a horse that you're training. work at his speed, to ensure he's getting all that you're teaching. and have fun :)
 

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The only difference I find in teaching an older horse is that he may have some strong behaviours/attitudes that you need to 'untrain'. Sounds like one of this boy's is having had bad experiences with hoof care in the past. As he's unstarted under saddle or with a bridle, he shouldn't be much different to a young untrained horse in that respect - how that goes will be entirely your doing, good or bad! ;-)
 

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I like training slightly older horses, as they're less baby-ish, more able to concentrate on work, and generally more mature.

Other than that, there's really not much difference. You may find though that he learns a tad slower at first- from not being accustomed to learning. Once he gets into the swing of things, he'll be just like any other horse. :)
 
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