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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My kids 3&8 and myself are beginning to get into horses. We're taking lessons on horsemanship (grooming, caring, ect) right now. Jumped in way to soon and bought the wrong her for us (lesson learned). My kids are big for the ages and I'd like to get a small horse/large pony for all of us to learn on (13-14hh) What are your suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
MY trainer said the same thing about the paints. I have really been thinking about a POA or welsh due to their smaller stature. My 3y/o is the size of an older 4y/o and my 8y/o is the size of a 12y/o so I want something stout but not to tall. Something that we can use for a while until we're ready to move up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah, your trainer and I are on the same page where Paints are concerned. I've known some tough minded horses, but the Paint breed seems to excel in this area. About the toughest nuts to crack.

I'm not as well versed in pony breeds, but I've always heard good things in general about the Welsh breed.
Stubborness seems to be the BIG issue with my mare. She learned she could bully me and that was that. I'm doing better on the ground with taking charge, but I'm not confident enough in the saddle to try her out again. First and last ride on her she decided she was done and started acting up, so me not being confident she got her way and now she knows she can. I'm not willing to put the kids on her. They really want to ride. The lessons have kept them happy, but we've only road a few times so far. My trainer is all about care and horsemanship first. She says if you can't care for them properly you don't need to be on them. I agree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
To the OP: Don't bother listening to the breed bigots and find a horse that is right for you. Don't limit your search to ponies as finding a well broke one is difficult and likely more expensive than a larger horse. You need a horse that is old and well trained. Don't worry about conformation, sex, size, breed or color. Worry about the amount and quality of the training the horse has. Find someone that is knowledgable and let them help you find the proper horse for you.

Our instructor is helping in the hunt. I have told her that if she wouldn't put one of her new students on it, I don't want it. Unfortuntly having spent my larger alotment on Molly I don't have much to spend right now, but trainer says you never know when you'll find the right one at your price. So, fingers crossed:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I agree with many of the other posts that you shouldn't worry about which breed at this point. I suggest continuing to work on your experience and confidence. Horses are all about leaders, and if you're not confident enough to be the leader, the horse will be, whether it's a green or dead broke one.

I think that's my biggest problem, lack of confindence. My kids seem to be more confident already around the training horses than I am. I guess as an adult and mother I worry more about getting hurt than they do. My three y/o girl has no fear what so ever it scares the daylights out of me. She'll just walk right up and start petting. Even with Molly she goes right to the fence calls her and starts petting on her. Of course Molly stands body length along the fence so the kids can pet her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
She is BEAUTIFUL Hoofprints. I love the buckskin. I've wanted one ever since I saw Spirit. I think I'm worse than the kids where horses are concerned. Having grown up wanting them and never being able to. I guess I still have that little girl wants a pony syndrome.

My Molly is a rescue. I have her for sale, only because I spent my alontment on her and don't have the funds to send her to training, but I go back and forth. I think that once she's had some time on her she'll be a great horse. She needs a lot more time, but she loves kids and when they are near she seems so calm and loving with them. I've already told my husband that if we get one at a cheaper price she's just going to have to stick around as a buddy until we can send her for retraining.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
She is broke to ride, Hoofprints. She's actually really awesome on the ground. We have 60 acres, but she stays pretty much on the south 5 where her little barn's at and all I have to do is call and she'll come running. She halters like a breeze and tacks up so easlily. The weather here has been horrible but yesterday it wasn't raining, so I went out called her up to groom her. I don't even have to tie her if the halters on she'll stand stock still. I brushed her down and picked out all four hooves!! Now for me that was a big deal, because I haven't been brave enough to do her back ones by myself before. The issue is that I don't so enough leadership and confidence and when she starts acting up (walking off when trying to mount, jerking head, turning around when she doesn't want to go somewhere) I let her have her way. We have started lessons but have only had a few riding lessons so far. Like I said, my kids seem more confident than me. I really go back and forth, I don't want to sell her I want to keep her and have her tuned up or retrained and the kids are getting thier horse fix with lessons, right. It's really tuff for me, because I do thoroughly enjoy her even without being able to ride her. And the more questions I ask and the more I hear I think our problems stem more from my inexperience than her lack of willingness. We just need more time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 · (Edited)
First and formost since this seems to have gotten off track with the Q/H Paint comparison, the OP needs to complete their training and learn the confidence and skill to be the herd leader or they will continue to buy and sell every horse they get. I don't care what breed or what age they are the same problems will arise with each horse no matter how old or trained they are. We have worked with so many great horses that for the lack of a proper leader in their owner develop bad habits. How many big trainers have said there are a lot of great horses with a lot of bad owners.

I also cannot understand why you would get rid of this horse. If you cannot afford a trainer for this horse how can you afford another horse even if you sell?

I also can tell you I have sold a few of those problem horses we have brought around and countless times have turned down people who want to buy a young horse for their beginner. I personally won't sell a youngster to a beginning rider. The best choice is an older 15+ been there, done that horse that can be leased. Good luck in your search. Once you and your children have the confidence and skill developed there will be plenty of chance to look around for the perfect breed.

I am answering the bolded question.

We are selling Molly because we can't give her the instruction that she deserves. The money will be used for more lessons for us. We are not going to purchase another horse until we are more confident and knowledgable. Myself, my husband, and my trainer believe that we don't need to make another horse purchase until we can get on the horse and decide for ourselves if we're comfortable with it.

As many of the posters and readers who have helped answer some of my quetions know, we bought this mare with the belief that she was beginner safe and kid broke and paid beginner money for her. Yes, I know we made the first beginner buyer mistake with buying on first visit, we've been over that. Lesson WELL learned. That is why I can't afford to send her to a trainer at this point.

As much as myself and kids want a horse of our own, I agree that it isn't our time yet. I have learned a valuable lesson, and that is to not put the cart before the horse, literally. I also hope that this expreince will follow my kids in other directions as well. Knowledge and work, then reward.

Please understand that I acknowledge that I (we) are not in anyway, form, or fashion experienced with horses, but we have a great love and desire to be included in their world. My goal is to learn as much as I can and aid my children (3 & eight) in their learning experience. The best way for me to do that is to ask questions and take in the opinions of those experienced in that area. I have learned a lot from you guys and our instructor and am still doing so. With so many views and opinions I am able to make better decisions for us. I understand that many adults my not be as open minded to others sharing their knowledge, but I do not have a know it all mentality. I welcome others instruction and opinions. Like I said, for me personally it helps aid me in the best direction for my family. This forum's members are who helped me decide to find a riding instructor and that is one of the best decisions I've made in our quest to get involved in the horse world. Horse lovers are some of the most passionate, dedicated people I have met. That is why I think this thread got a bit off track, but that's okay, becasue I have still learned a lot from each post. Thank you for sharing guys.
 
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