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I think breed has less to do with, then quality of past training, experience and overall temperament. Having said that, there are breeds that tend to be more agreeable in general.

Quarter Horses are a nice choice. Some smaller draft crosses can be quite nice...sturdy and laidback. Appaloosas are usually suitable. Paints not so much...tend to be a bit too strong minded, but a Paint cross might work nicely. Standardbreds are idiot proof, but can be frustrating to retrain as suitable mounts...so if you go that way, you need to get one that doesn't have canter issues. There are lots of pony breed choices...that's a very one on one issue as a lot of ponies can be just brutal.

Again though, suggest that age, training and temperament be your first criteria.
 

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MY trainer said the same thing about the paints. I have really been thinking about a POA or welsh due to their smaller stature. My 3y/o is the size of an older 4y/o and my 8y/o is the size of a 12y/o so I want something stout but not to tall. Something that we can use for a while until we're ready to move up.
Yeah, your trainer and I are on the same page where Paints are concerned. I've known some tough minded horses, but the Paint breed seems to excel in this area. About the toughest nuts to crack.

I'm not as well versed in pony breeds, but I've always heard good things in general about the Welsh breed.
 

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Stubborness seems to be the BIG issue with my mare. She learned she could bully me and that was that. I'm doing better on the ground with taking charge, but I'm not confident enough in the saddle to try her out again. First and last ride on her she decided she was done and started acting up, so me not being confident she got her way and now she knows she can. I'm not willing to put the kids on her. They really want to ride. The lessons have kept them happy, but we've only road a few times so far. My trainer is all about care and horsemanship first. She says if you can't care for them properly you don't need to be on them. I agree.
I find that a lot of them are 'self-aware'. Meaning, they know how big and how strong they are, typically through having been spoiled early on because of their natural inherent tough-mindedness . Once they have that type of knowledge, it's a whole new ballgame.

If you can once get them agreeable with you, they are mentally tough mounts, which is a huge asset. It's getting there that is the mountain that needs to be climbed.

It sounds like you have a good plan for moving forward and an ideal mentor to help you get there. Don't give up on your girl, she'll be a wonderful teacher, but certainly it seems that a more suitable mount is in order for this stage of the game.

I have the utmost confidence that you'll get there and be riding your mare in the future and enjoying her. Best wishes and keep us updated!
 

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Thanks ya'll. I'm always encouraged after visiting with you!
I just realized you're in Oklahoma. Some very good friends of mine are moving back there this spring. If you haven't found a suitable mount by then, drop me a PM and I'll put you in contact. They know EVERYBODY in OK and Texas in the horse world and could probably point you in the right direction.
 

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the two breeds share ALOT if not most of the same bloodlines as well as alot if not most major traits.....
No they don't. The QH has become specialized for several different disciplines. You will not find Paint blood in a QH bred for reining, cutting, ranch, racing, hus, dressage, halter or pleasure.

Anybody breeding QH's or Paints for the serious QH or Paint markets, don't cross the breeds. And any horse with one or the other breed more than three generations back no longer counts as a 'crossbred' because there isn't enough genetic material to worry about.

If we are to believe what you're saying, then the TB and the Arab, and a whole other list of breeds are essentially the same because they came from the same bloodlines...but clearly they are breeds unto themselves.

The horse in my avatar is by a roping bred Paint stallion...not one registered QH within the first 5 generations.
 

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I've actually never heard that about Paints! (learn something new every day I guess haha!) :) I actually own a registered Paint (solid buckskin) and she is the CALMEST horse I know, VERY very willing and extremely sweet and smart! Here's some pics of her...I wouldn't rule out ANY breed because there are always exceptions...but I'd say if I HAD to pick a breed, QH's are usually all of the above.
You own one? And you've owned and trained how many in your lifetime?

Of course there are exceptions. Who cares? It's irrelevant. For the sake of the providing the best advice we can to the OP, we must talk in generalities.

And as I clearly stated in my first post to the OP...here, let me quote myself - "I think breed has less to do with it, then quality of past training, experience and overall temperament."


(and most Paints have QH bloodlines which is why I was surprised about the above opinion of them)
Not any more. If there isn't a number of registered QH's in the first three generations, you're talking apples and oranges.

Because of the need to specialize to excel in the various disciplines, the QH and Paint look nothing alike conformationally. In fact, within the QH breed itself, you will see a large variance in conformation.

The Paint and QH are no longer the same horse. It's like saying the Lusitano and the Andalusian are the same horse. Umm....no, they aren't.
 
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