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Stubborness seems to be the BIG issue with my mare. She learned she could bully me and that was that. I'm doing better on the ground with taking charge, but I'm not confident enough in the saddle to try her out again. First and last ride on her she decided she was done and started acting up, so me not being confident she got her way and now she knows she can. I'm not willing to put the kids on her.
I agree with many of the other posts that you shouldn't worry about which breed at this point. I suggest continuing to work on your experience and confidence. Horses are all about leaders, and if you're not confident enough to be the leader, the horse will be, whether it's a green or dead broke one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
To the OP: Don't bother listening to the breed bigots and find a horse that is right for you. Don't limit your search to ponies as finding a well broke one is difficult and likely more expensive than a larger horse. You need a horse that is old and well trained. Don't worry about conformation, sex, size, breed or color. Worry about the amount and quality of the training the horse has. Find someone that is knowledgable and let them help you find the proper horse for you.

Our instructor is helping in the hunt. I have told her that if she wouldn't put one of her new students on it, I don't want it. Unfortuntly having spent my larger alotment on Molly I don't have much to spend right now, but trainer says you never know when you'll find the right one at your price. So, fingers crossed:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I agree with many of the other posts that you shouldn't worry about which breed at this point. I suggest continuing to work on your experience and confidence. Horses are all about leaders, and if you're not confident enough to be the leader, the horse will be, whether it's a green or dead broke one.

I think that's my biggest problem, lack of confindence. My kids seem to be more confident already around the training horses than I am. I guess as an adult and mother I worry more about getting hurt than they do. My three y/o girl has no fear what so ever it scares the daylights out of me. She'll just walk right up and start petting. Even with Molly she goes right to the fence calls her and starts petting on her. Of course Molly stands body length along the fence so the kids can pet her.
 

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Yeah, your trainer and I are on the same page where Paints are concerned. I've known some tough minded horses, but the Paint breed seems to excel in this area. About the toughest nuts to crack.

I'm not as well versed in pony breeds, but I've always heard good things in general about the Welsh breed.
I've actually never heard that about Paints! (learn something new every day I guess haha!) :) I actually own a registered Paint (solid buckskin) and she is the CALMEST horse I know, VERY very willing and extremely sweet and smart! Here's some pics of her...I wouldn't rule out ANY breed because there are always exceptions...but I'd say if I HAD to pick a breed, QH's are usually all of the above. (and most Paints have QH bloodlines which is why I was surprised about the above opinion of them)







Here's a video too...there's nothing this mare wouldn't do for me! And she was a green broke 7 yr old rescue when I got her a year ago and I've only been riding 3 years so let me tell you she is VERY forgiving!!! :)

So I guess I'm kinda biased about Paints maybe!! hehe

 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
She is BEAUTIFUL Hoofprints. I love the buckskin. I've wanted one ever since I saw Spirit. I think I'm worse than the kids where horses are concerned. Having grown up wanting them and never being able to. I guess I still have that little girl wants a pony syndrome.

My Molly is a rescue. I have her for sale, only because I spent my alontment on her and don't have the funds to send her to training, but I go back and forth. I think that once she's had some time on her she'll be a great horse. She needs a lot more time, but she loves kids and when they are near she seems so calm and loving with them. I've already told my husband that if we get one at a cheaper price she's just going to have to stick around as a buddy until we can send her for retraining.
 

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Thanks horse dreamer! I too ALWAYS wanted a pony growing up, but was never even given lessons :-( So when I turned 26 and got married, I decided to start lessons, and 3 yrs later, got Sandie :) She was definitely a diamond in the rough and I will do anything and everything in my power to make sure this is her forever home!

I wish you the BEST of luck with your mare! You say you can't afford training, was she green broke or anything when you rescued her? Proper training is certainly essential and professional trainers are great for that, but I'll bet if she's willing and you had the time, you could train her yourself...I've learned a TON in the past year about training my mare from professional trainers, books, and places like this forum! If you want to give it a try and have questions about where to start, feel free to start a thread on here, or ask me! ;-) I may not be a paid trainer but I'd consider myself to have at least the basic knowledge for building a good foundation with a green broke horse!
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
She is broke to ride, Hoofprints. She's actually really awesome on the ground. We have 60 acres, but she stays pretty much on the south 5 where her little barn's at and all I have to do is call and she'll come running. She halters like a breeze and tacks up so easlily. The weather here has been horrible but yesterday it wasn't raining, so I went out called her up to groom her. I don't even have to tie her if the halters on she'll stand stock still. I brushed her down and picked out all four hooves!! Now for me that was a big deal, because I haven't been brave enough to do her back ones by myself before. The issue is that I don't so enough leadership and confidence and when she starts acting up (walking off when trying to mount, jerking head, turning around when she doesn't want to go somewhere) I let her have her way. We have started lessons but have only had a few riding lessons so far. Like I said, my kids seem more confident than me. I really go back and forth, I don't want to sell her I want to keep her and have her tuned up or retrained and the kids are getting thier horse fix with lessons, right. It's really tuff for me, because I do thoroughly enjoy her even without being able to ride her. And the more questions I ask and the more I hear I think our problems stem more from my inexperience than her lack of willingness. We just need more time.
 

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Hello there! well as for an even tempered pony breed ive found POA's to have the best temperment...that an halflingers arent bad though there are some in my area that cop an attitude. If your looking to buy a stocky pony the ranch i work at breeds POA's for reining. The only issue being how much you wanna spend on the horse...if your looking for a cheap horse i cant help you much.

To be honest though i dont think you need to look for a specific breed. A short stocky heinz 57(mix breed) might be right for you! A QH cross with a mild tempered pony might do you well. In general i would steer clear of TB's an arab's though. Some people, me included, love to argue against the stereo type but in truth most arabs an TBs are hot heads....

Hope this helps a bit! and if your interested in what one of the ranches POA horses might cost i can give you a contact. The only one i think they would sell thats the height you are wanting is Princess but she is sweet lol, im not sure though...
 

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I've actually never heard that about Paints! (learn something new every day I guess haha!) :) I actually own a registered Paint (solid buckskin) and she is the CALMEST horse I know, VERY very willing and extremely sweet and smart! Here's some pics of her...I wouldn't rule out ANY breed because there are always exceptions...but I'd say if I HAD to pick a breed, QH's are usually all of the above.
You own one? And you've owned and trained how many in your lifetime?

Of course there are exceptions. Who cares? It's irrelevant. For the sake of the providing the best advice we can to the OP, we must talk in generalities.

And as I clearly stated in my first post to the OP...here, let me quote myself - "I think breed has less to do with it, then quality of past training, experience and overall temperament."


(and most Paints have QH bloodlines which is why I was surprised about the above opinion of them)
Not any more. If there isn't a number of registered QH's in the first three generations, you're talking apples and oranges.

Because of the need to specialize to excel in the various disciplines, the QH and Paint look nothing alike conformationally. In fact, within the QH breed itself, you will see a large variance in conformation.

The Paint and QH are no longer the same horse. It's like saying the Lusitano and the Andalusian are the same horse. Umm....no, they aren't.
 

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She is broke to ride, Hoofprints. She's actually really awesome on the ground. We have 60 acres, but she stays pretty much on the south 5 where her little barn's at and all I have to do is call and she'll come running. She halters like a breeze and tacks up so easlily. The weather here has been horrible but yesterday it wasn't raining, so I went out called her up to groom her. I don't even have to tie her if the halters on she'll stand stock still. I brushed her down and picked out all four hooves!! Now for me that was a big deal, because I haven't been brave enough to do her back ones by myself before. The issue is that I don't so enough leadership and confidence and when she starts acting up (walking off when trying to mount, jerking head, turning around when she doesn't want to go somewhere) I let her have her way. We have started lessons but have only had a few riding lessons so far. Like I said, my kids seem more confident than me. I really go back and forth, I don't want to sell her I want to keep her and have her tuned up or retrained and the kids are getting thier horse fix with lessons, right. It's really tuff for me, because I do thoroughly enjoy her even without being able to ride her. And the more questions I ask and the more I hear I think our problems stem more from my inexperience than her lack of willingness. We just need more time.
That's awesome to hear!! :) I think your comment in bold above is so true...I found the SAME thing as I was learning to train my mare. She is so willing, she just doesn't always know what I'm asking her to do, and it's my job to be clear to her all the time so that she knows.

It sounds like you're well on your way to having a very well-trained and rideable girl! I think you'll be on her someday, the more time you spend with her now and the more you build each other's trust!
 

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You own one? And you've owned and trained how many in your lifetime?

Of course there are exceptions. Who cares? It's irrelevant. For the sake of the providing the best advice we can to the OP, we must talk in generalities.

And as I clearly stated in my first post to the OP...here, let me quote myself - "I think breed has less to do with it, then quality of past training, experience and overall temperament."


Not any more. If there isn't a number of registered QH's in the first three generations, you're talking apples and oranges.

Because of the need to specialize to excel in the various disciplines, the QH and Paint look nothing alike conformationally. In fact, within the QH breed itself, you will see a large variance in conformation.

The Paint and QH are no longer the same horse. It's like saying the Lusitano and the Andalusian are the same horse. Umm....no, they aren't.
WOW let's not overreact here!! ;-) I wasn't being sarcastic when I said I'd never heard that about Paints before, I was being honest. I really haven't...but I learned something new, about that generality. No offense to you and I wasn't trying to start an argument with you. :)
 

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oh and i recently got a horse for my barns new lesson program, his name is Dusty, small quarterhorse, hes 25, teddybear personality allround great horse, walk trot canter cross rails. and he was free.

id look for an older horse for your family
 

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Not any more. If there isn't a number of registered QH's in the first three generations, you're talking apples and oranges.

Because of the need to specialize to excel in the various disciplines, the QH and Paint look nothing alike conformationally. In fact, within the QH breed itself, you will see a large variance in conformation.

The Paint and QH are no longer the same horse. It's like saying the Lusitano and the Andalusian are the same horse. Umm....no, they aren't.

In other threads I have agreed with you but you are totally wrong on this one. There is some variance in the different types of quarter horses depending on the use but paints and QH's compete in the exact same disciplines and often compete directly against each other in reining and cutting. In an earlier post on this thread there was posted world champion paints that have qh blood in them. Why don't you post a paint pedigree that doesn't have a qh in three generations? I have never seen one. The APHA doesn't recognize enough of a difference in the two breeds to prevent a qh from siring paint colts so they apperantly disagree with you also.
 

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Not any more. If there isn't a number of registered QH's in the first three generations, you're talking apples and oranges.

Because of the need to specialize to excel in the various disciplines, the QH and Paint look nothing alike conformationally. In fact, within the QH breed itself, you will see a large variance in conformation.

The Paint and QH are no longer the same horse. It's like saying the Lusitano and the Andalusian are the same horse. Umm....no, they aren't.
By the way, I was not trying to say they're not different breeds, I know that they are -- that would be why there are different registries :) But my mare is registered as a Paint, and has all QH's on the dam's side (her mother was a registered QH), and my friend has a Paint who has many QH's in her recent lineage.

So you're right, not ALL Paints have QH in their bloodlines, and I was not saying that at all...I just said that a LOT of them do, which is true for those I personally know who own Paints. Maybe not in your area so much, I don't know...just going by my own experience here, so sorry if I misspoke :)
 

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In other threads I have agreed with you but you are totally wrong on this one. There is some variance in the different types of quarter horses depending on the use but paints and QH's compete in the exact same disciplines and often compete directly against each other in reining and cutting. In an earlier post on this thread there was posted world champion paints that have qh blood in them. Why don't you post a paint pedigree that doesn't have a qh in three generations? I have never seen one. The APHA doesn't recognize enough of a difference in the two breeds to prevent a qh from siring paint colts so they apperantly disagree with you also.
Thank you! ;-) Here, have a look at my mare's lineage...

Coosas Playgirl Paint

Check out all those QH's! (including Coosa and Impressive) ;-)
 

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I have gone through a lot of difficult horses myself i have even has one who was in the middle of miscarying and i never even realised the owner just said she was out in the feild for a couple of months!
I wouldnt be to trustworthy when buying young childrens ponies! if you were looking for a pony to learn on i would suggest that an older one might be a little quieter something from 14-20! mares can sometiimes have very bad moodswings so i myself would prefer a gelding NEVER a stallion! and the quietest breeds i have come across are cobs and draught ponys! mayby and appolossa either! it depends look for nasty tendencies when your looking at ponies ,ears back , narky and unwilling woud be ones to start!:) goodluck and i hope you find the right one although no pony is ever going to be perfect but some can be close:)
 

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Thank you! ;-) Here, have a look at my mare's lineage...

Coosas Playgirl Paint

Check out all those QH's! (including Coosa and Impressive) ;-)
Twenty five out of thirty horses in the last generation listed are quarter horses and exactly half of the rest of the pedigree are qhs. Thank you for sharing that.
 

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I have not read all the posts so sorry if I double up on something.

I read Welsh mentioned and I think they are a fantastic breed if you don't mind a shorter horse. My first pony was a demon and a reason I will NEVER have a pony for my kids. I would of been much happier on a big ol' QH then any of the ponies my Mom showed me after her. My trainer found us an 8yr old Welsh cob/arab gelding I think when I was 7 (so I had about 5 years of riding/lessons). He was AMAZING. Patient, kind, forgiving, very gentle. He was an excellent "first horse". I would get another just like him for my own children in a heart beat if I ever found one.

I think temperament is the most important thing. My trainer bred arabs but they had such amazing calm and willing temperaments that I have never understood the stigma against Arabs I hear from other horse people. My children almost 3 and 5 both ride my TB gelding who is just turning 7. My son has been riding him since my horse was 3. I wouldn't put them on any TB but Aidan is very very calm and very cautious with children, my friends daughter who is 3 also rides her TB gelding who is 5 now.

I think it's important for you assess the horses temperament no matter what breed it is. Take your trainer or another knowledgeable horse person to point out the pro's and con's when looking at any horse.

I'll wrap up this terribly long post by saying though you may find a perfect horse for you all to learn on take the chance to ride allot of different horses. Once you have more experience under your belt you will learn very important lessons by not riding the horse you aren't 100% comfortable with and that will throw you a curve ball :)
 

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Bashkir Curlies, all the way :D Look them up and you will find that they are the ultimate family horse that comes in a variety of sizes. Their docile temperments make them perfect for children that are on the younger side.
 
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