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Discussion Starter #1
I have been to plenty of shows and i have heard MAny people talk about their horses blood lines and how certain ones make a good barrel horse and blah blah blah. I really dont care bout blood lines because what are they gonna do im mean their blood lines not like a i dont know something special yea know. I want to know other people opionons about this because i dont think their important but i just want to see what other people think on this subject about blood lines.
 

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I think bloodlines a very important. A horse will take after it's parents athletic ability so if you have a horse out of two 1D barrel horses chances are your colt is going to be above average at barrels.

I also think that it's really important for every animal to be papred so that we can track genetic defects much easier.
 

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Bloodlines are important, but they are not definite. Not all well bred horses are fantastic and there are grade horses I wouldn't turn away.

I also don't really care about who my horses great great grandfather is. However if I can look at his sire and dam I can see what they excelled on (and are bred for) and select a job for him based on that. If I am breeding, I can look at the sire and dam and select based on complimenting conformation in the hopes to get a well put together horse. Does it always work? Of course not. But it's better than just breeding blindly.

Also, artificial breeding allows for artificial selection. I have a better chance (not guaranteed) of getting a good cow horse if I look for lineage of horses that are built for getting down after a cow and naturally took to chasing cows. I wouldn't want a 17h dressage bred horse to sort cattle all day with just like a stocky little cow horse wouldn't be my first choice for my next eventer. Bloodlines influence conformation and build and thus what they will excell in. HOWEVER, personality and training of course plays a part
 

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You have a horse (we will call him A). A is a wonderful race horse, great confirmation, no leg injuries (or what not) and he sires the same. His foals are great racers and their foals are great racers. People start wanting his lines because "racing is in their blood".

You have a bloodline.

Bloodlines say possibility. My filly is Impressive bred, what does that say? Halter! Her sire and her dame and their sires and dames and so on were all halter bred horses and she comes from halter bloodlines.

I like bloodlines, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
But i have a horse that had the "best" barrel bloodlines you can get(thats what my trainer said) and he ended up being a pleasure horse because he didn't have the desier to run like most barrel horses do. I no some people that would have still forced him but i wanted the best for him so i just ended up selling him off to a little girl that did the pleasure. Most of my horses are registed but i couldn't tell you the first horse on their papers cause i dont care
 

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Your horse doesn't have the heart for racing.
He's probably built well enough for it though if he does have good breeding for it.
Bloodlines are not the only part of the equation.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yea he was built up real nice my trainer said that if he had heart he would have been a great barrel horse. The girl i sold him to though really loves him and what i find sad is that she used him in pleasure and now games him and he will run full out for her! maybe he just needed someone to work with him instead of just bein sent to a trainer but im still glad for her.
 

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Bloodlines are not terribly important to me. I just ride for fun and do ranch work so it isn't important that I have a *such-and-such* bred horse. When it comes to excelling at a particular discipline; racing, WP, reining, dressage, jumping, etc., etc., bloodlines do play a big part because many times, successful parents and grandparents will mean a capable foal. Of course though, there are exceptions to every rule. My brother is the exact opposite, he wants his horses to be dripping with cow savvy and wants the old type cutting lines like Mr San Peppy, Doc O'Lena, Colonel Freckles, Colonel Hotrodder, etc. I don't really need anything like that. They can be fun to play on sometimes but my horses are taught to watch a cow and they do well enough for me, I don't need something that I can take to a NCHA show. I guess that may be why my main horses are 2 mustangs, a grade qh, and someday (when he grows up) a qhxbelgian. LOL. But I don't do anything that I would need a horse to really excell at, I prefer good all around using horses and you don't need bloodlines of any kind for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well all my horses are registered except buck but the only reason they are is so i can take them to AQHA shows but i have never looked at their bloodlines on any of the papers. and i really dont believe that it matters for anything what kind of bloodlines your horse has because my horse buddy aka Gandi Dancer, is a great cutter but does barrels to and i really dont even care if he has the "Bloodlines" for either because he has already won thousands so obviously it doesn't matter that much
 

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How can you make an argument about bloodlines if you know nothing about them and don't care to learn?

Not saying you have to, but if you don't care...
 

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I think bloodlines are a great way to track genetic ability as well as genetic defects.

Anyone who buys an Impressive bred horse knows to have that horse tested for Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis. Why? Because through keeping track of bloodlines, this disease has been linked to Impressive bred horses.

By keeping track of bloodline natural ability can be monitored. If a particular horse has great "cow" or racing abilities, ect., and they have successfully passed that on to their progeny and so on, then if you are looking for a horse for a specific purpose such as racing, roping, ect., you'd probably look to its bloodlines to show that it has the natural ability to do just that. Having the natural ability means the horse has the proper mindset, conformation, and temperment to do a specific discipline or group of disciplines. This makes a great deal of difference and (usually) makes the horses easier to train if they have been bred for that specific purpose.

Now natural ability doesn't necessarily mean that a specific horse will love to do or even be good at what it is bred to do, but more often than not, they are.

Keeping track of bloodlines is very useful you can track color, size, temperment, ability, longevity, health and much more by looking at a horses ancestry.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
well im not trying to argue but i just dont get y some people think about the horses bloodlines before they even ride the horse, one of my friends had a horse forsale and ended up losing the sale because the person said that the horse had "Sucky" bloodlines and that horse does everything and anything, he has roped, gamed, been a rodeo pick up horse, done cutting, sorting and team penning and the horse just got shot down because of his blood lines(not literally)
 

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Was he gelded? Some people sadly are bloodline snobs, but it is a personal preference, just like you don't care, bloodlines mean alot to some people.

Also when purchasing a horse, I like to look at the bloodlines for the sake of resaleability, whereas you might not really care, it may make you alot more money to sell a papered horse because of the bloodlines it posesses. It is alot more difficult to unload an unpapered horse or one that has poor breeding, than a papered horse with decent lines, and that is just a fact. Your unpapered horse might be better than any unpaprered horse out there, but the big spenders in the market today are looking for lines more than anything (the ones where i live anyway).
 

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Discussion Starter #14
well this is kinda a personal thing but all my horses are registered and i ended up selling one of my reg. ones for around 35,000 i no papers make them more valuable n that but i dont no
 

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There are many things pedigree can tell you about a horse. Especially if you are a breeder. I breed and show in a certain discipline so I look at the horses pedigrees quite a bit. I want a horse bred to do that discipline. I know what lines cross better with what lines. I also know what lines to stay away from. Is this a 100% certainty?? No there is exceptions to every rule but the rule will win out the vast majority of the time.

This is why registries keep track of pedigree and points and earnings for each given event. If it was not important they would not do all the work it takes to track a this info.

The pedigrees on my horses say reiner and reined cow horse. That is what each excel at at a high level. I have also had a cutting bred stallion who was a decent reiner better reined cow horse and what made him good at these things also made him a pretty good Speed event horse. He had good rate and turn b/c of the cow. He had OK speed but made up for it at the turns. He had a good work ethic you get from the cow lines. He was what his breed said he would be. A bit lazy but other then that worked well.

Cassie one of my reining mares looks like her breeding. She also performs like her breeding says she should perform. Also these lines are known to be very very good NRHA Open level reiner and do just as well with their non pro owners. This is something pedigree with tell you. This mare has earnings not only in the NRHA Open but also in the green and rookie reiner just like her pedigree says she should. Same with her brother.

I can go on and on about different lines. Again there are always exceptions however the rule will be more prevalent then the exception.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well i no that many breeders need good bloodlines and thats what that person the "shot" down my friends horse was looking for she was looking for a better team penning stud then what Shay was, but it dont matter now SHay's dead but my buckskin(buddy) is a great cow horse but i really have never looked at his lines to see what he was bred for and i really dont want to no because i didn't even no he was reg. until 3 month ago so that was a shock but a good shock
 

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thing is how can you sit here and say that lines are not important when you know nothing about them how to use them correctly.

Knowing lines gives you a lot of info. It is like putting something together. You might be able to do it with out the instructions but it sure helps to have them.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
i no stuff bout lines i may not know as much as you do but for a 13 year old i sure do no alot more then some people. I have looked at acouple of my horses lines but only because i wanted to see what i could find out about their now dead sires, but thats the only time ive ever really looked closely at them and for useing them correctly i dont think i need to because i wont breed any of my horses for acouple of years seein as i use all my horses in everything i do so, wont need to no how to use them "correctly" for acouple of years
 

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i love looking at my horses bloodlines, because i always love to see good hroses in there... but there have been alot of horses with not-so-good bloodlines that have made it to the top. i like to look at the horse AND bloodlines, but i look at the horse most importantly
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thats kinda how i see it rider girl because yea papers might make the horse more valuable in the end but if you like the horse and you get to bond with it paper really end up not mattering unless you do huge AQHA show or whatever, but that the only reason mine are reg. because i go to them shows sometimes. but if you like the horse that is the most important thing (i think)
 
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