The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone! I'm in a pickle, mostly with myself. I'm wanting to be a veterinarian, and I couldn't see myself doing anything else, but there's a slight problem, well to me anyway. To become a vet, it's about 8 years of college, or that's the number produced from research and what my student adviser has told me. But, the salary in the end isn't very impressive, I know it isn't all about money but to pay off loans for almost a decade in school, money would be preferred. Competition is also rough getting into the schools and classes you want/need and I'm not quiet sure what to do now.
I'm graduating high school soon and I've completed my Agriculture classes, competed in FFA contests for scholarships, wildlife classes, advanced animal science, veterinary application classes, medical terminology and so forth just to be prepared for college but I'm not sure if it's worth it.

Am I overreacting, or is this a probable concern?​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
In the end, if you can make enough money to live on, pay the bills and put aside a little bit every month, then having a job that you enjoy going to every day is far, far more important than the dollars. Only you can decide that.

If you do decide to go through the education, living inexpensively and counting your dimes as you go through school will help you in the long run as well. The less debt you accumulate in the first place, the easier it will be when you are finally paying it off.

Also, just because you go through for "verterinarian," doesn't mean that's the only option. And it doesn't mean you have to work at a verterinarian clinic. If you stay in that field, you could end up running your own clinic, or you could work in any field that needs animals -- entertainment, education, training, competition. There are probably lots of side vocations that the vet training would be required in, or a huge asset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I honestly don't want to give up being a vet, I've always wanted to be one and I want to fulfill my dream, but I honestly can't afford 8 years of college. The only way it could be possible would be through a ton of scholarships, part-time jobs, loans, and whatever else I can scrape up. Money is basically my whole problem, will I be able to afford to pay off the student loans once I become this, or will there even be a spot available for me to begin working? I know no one can really say, but I'm just wanting someone else's opinion of the possibility or other options. I'm pretty much just panicking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
In Canada, there are some programs to help young people, especially the unemployed to improve their education. Is there anything like that in your area? Some programs are designed for right out of high school, some are geared to young workers that are unable to improve without education, some are geared to newly unemployeed people.

There are ways to make it work, but it won't be easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I have no idea, Texas isn't very helpful. TAMU is raising their tuition $2,000 a year until the fall of 2015. I'm going to try and get residency in another state when I decide that's the college I want to attend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
I am dealing with the same problem. I'm currently in college and when I was in my senior year I applied like crazy for scholarships. I've been planning on going to veterinary school since the second grade haha. It is all I've ever wanted to do. Anyways, to prepare for admission I did a lot of volunteer work, paid work, joined several clubs (science olympiad, scholastic bowl, chinese club, ect.), and kept my grades really high. This helped out with the scholarships. I received 6 scholarships. This combined with my FAFSA money more than paid for my entire first year. I have leftover money for next year. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
I forgot to mention I also had an interview at a local equine hospital last week for a vet assistant position. I'm still waiting to hear back from them. You should start building relationships with people in the field now. They are very useful for recommendation letters when you go to apply for vet school.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'm pretty active in the extra curricular activities, my high school unfortunately doesn't offer much. I called a local vet because they were hiring kennel help, but they had said the position was filled, but the ad has continued to show up in the paper 2 weeks later, so I'm not so sure. The vets or any one for that matter, are pretty rude and don't want high school kids working there, not sure why. I've offered to help at farms and ranches and even my Ag teachers. I was hoping I'd be able to raise an animal for show and try to get some profit for school, but a series of events prevented me from even trying to buy an animal. I still honestly don't know what college to attend for anything, let alone a Vet Med grad school. It's so confusing and stressful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,900 Posts
Great advice from Ninja. Work hard, have high grades, & build relationships. I've never met a $Poor$ vet. Most have loved their jobs. Be the best vet you can be & you'll never be poor. You can work anywhere & wouldn't it be great to be wanted? I rented a house to a vet for a couple of years, then she had enough to go buy her own place-she was a small animal vet, but she did have a couple of horses at my place once she settled in. She probably did their vet work herself, unless a surgery might be needed.

If a vet is 1/2 way decent I doubt they would be on the lowest rung of earnings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
I wouldn't call. It is too easy for them to turn you down then. I would go in and ask. If they say no again, I would ask about shadowing or volunteering. I had a hard time getting any positive answers when I called. As for the money problem, could you go to a community college for your prerequisite classes? As long as you make sure they transfer to your choice college you will be fine. It isn't as much fun as going away to school, but it is a fraction of the cost. It would also give you a chance to build better relationships with your local vets. They want someone that is available when they need them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I plan on going to a community college first to get the prerequisite classes completed then transfer. I'm going to apply like crazy for scholarships and possibly get a part-time job if there's anything available. Another problem is transportation, I have to carpool with friends and basically beg for rides from my FFA meetings and my competitions, so it makes me feel really low. I should be getting my first car in January, but until then I can't do much. The nearest vet is about 20 miles from my home, and I can't walk that. It's just so disappointing that I have a great chance at a wonderful future, but it's the small things holding me back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
Are there any colleges in your area that offer a Small Animal Vet course? My mom really wanted to be a vet, but schooling was much to expensive for her so she took a Small Animal course at a local college, she worked at a vets office for years just with that, it's not a full out vet course, but you still get into that atmosphere & you are hands on, helping in surgerys and what not. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Unfortunately, I live in a small rural town and the closest college is about 100 miles away. My town is building a small sister community college/shelter for Angelina College that's located in Lufkin but it's not going to have all the courses and won't be done for 4 more years. Also, I'm wanting to be a large animal vet because I'm allergic to cats, fleas, and pet dander.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
You could vet tech during college to start saving money before you have to pay it back. And a plus would be working with animals= experience!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I have no idea, Texas isn't very helpful. TAMU is raising their tuition $2,000 a year until the fall of 2015. I'm going to try and get residency in another state when I decide that's the college I want to attend.
Going to school outside of your state will raise expenses. Try sticking to an in-state college to get a resident discount on top of whatever grants you receive. Check out "FAFSA" to see if you qualify for the pell grants. Even if you think you won't there's no harm trying cause you can get better offers on loans as well. However, if you plan on submitting one- Make sure you apply before the deadlines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,221 Posts
I'm in almost the same situation as you, Leemew. I live in Texas and want to be a large animal veterinarian, but have very little financial help as well. I aim to attempt TAMU as well but am unsure about exact logistics. I might move cross-state. Not sure yet. My family is lower middle class. The only difference is that I'm a junior, so I won't be going to college for two years.

Have you applied for financial aid? I just applied for it, to see what I can get. Its worth a try.

I've been lucky enough to shadow a local small animal veterinarian for the past two years (three times a year) because we built a relationship with her through my wobblers/luxating patella recoveree puppy- strangely enough. One thing that both she and my BO have suggested to me is to go to a community college that offers a tech program and go there. Get the classes that I need for my associates, but also work towards becoming certified as a veterinary tech at the same tim (a lot of work, but possibly worth it) so that I can work at a clinic as a Vet Tech through my actual veterinary college, or even before that if I have to- to save up money in order to pay off tuition/housing/car. I've also been told that Blinn community college is a great one to attend if you're aiming for TAMU, because they are a sister college to the university. They actually even have some of the same professors and some great A&M prep classes/family groups that you can become a part of to make transitioning to TAMU smoother.

My personal plan is to work my senior year as much as I can, and either attend a community college here in town but also take online courses from Texas Tech (they'll certify you as a vet tech) or blinn to get my vet tech degree before I graduate junior college, then transfer to TAMU and hopefully get a part time job as a vet tech or assistant. That way I can at least pay for my housing, if not part of my tuition. I'll pinch pennies all of the way through college and after while I'm finding a job, until I've paid off my students loans and can buy a house (at 60 years old maybe? LOL) its not a perfect plan but it seems like the closest that someone in my (or your) situation can get to.

I wish I could be more helpful. Good luck and know that I'm cheering for you! I know just how frustrating it can be.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Leemew

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I was considering getting my tech degree while trying for the other, but I thought it wouldn't be worth it because they require different things so it would add more years and debt. I'm most likely going to apply at every college that's in Texas, costing a pretty penny. Most of the people at my High School get accepted to TAMU or Texas Tech. I just honestly have no idea what to do.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top