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Hi everyone! We just moved to our new 30 acre farm in Iowa and it is pretty much a blank slate other than the pre-existing house and 32x60' workshop. We are in the process of getting quotes for a 42'x70' barn to be built this summer and I have a couple things I'm not sure on since we are still in the planning stages trying to figure the floor plan etc. I have included a picture of the floor plan we most likely will base the barn off of and an exterior design we liked.

1. We found a pre-made floor plan that we like, but it has a seperate 16'x14' tack room and a 16'x14' feed room. Since this will be our own private barn I'm wondering if there are any real benefits to a separate tack and feed room? Has anyone found with their private barns that they loved having them separate? Should we maybe just combine the two for a larger 32'x14' tack/feed room? My family's barn growing up didn't even have a tack or feed room so I'm not 100% sure which one I would prefer馃槄

2. The aisle on the floor plan is 14'. We just bought a little 26 hp Kubota that will be used for the horse barn. It fits just fine through the 10' wide workshop doors and I think the extra 4' will be enough to get around if we need to walk by, but does anyone have a 14' aisle and like it? Too small or just right? I know for sure I don't want to go any smaller.

3. I was thinking 12' wide lean-to's off of both 70' sides of the barn. Is 12' a good width for a lean-to? Has anyone found that they preferred a wider or shorter width for a lean-to?

4. My next question is about paddocks off of the stalls. For those that have them do you like having them? My horses will be stalled only for inclement weather, emergencies and for feeding. I am still contemplating adding 14'x20' individual paddocks off of each stall for more room when they have to be stalled. We will be for sure already adding exterior dutch doors for safety reasons, extra air flow and ease of access to individual stalls.

5. For flooring we are thinking a concrete pad and then Ramm's Thurobed Mattresses in each stall and rubber brick pavers in all other areas of the barn. My question is has anyone used and liked the Thurobed's in their barn? Also does anyone have the Rubber Brick pavers and like them?

6. Ventilation. We are planning for (3) 4'x4' cupolas, exterior dutch doors on every stall, sliding barn end doors on both ends of the barn and (3) windows on both barn ends (two on each side on the door and one above the door). My question is should we also install ceiling fans or just add stall fans for more ventilation/air flow? or both? I want to make sure this barn is as airy as possible for the hot summer months.

7. Eave lights. We were considering adding eave lights along both 70' sides of the barn. Does anyone have them and like them? Any cons? We want to try and maximize on the natural light as much as possible.

Thanks!
 

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My preference is separate. Just always made more sense. If it is large enough so feed can stay on one side and tack on the other then if you plant on heating or cooling, even dehumidifying then there is benefit to one space. How rodent tight will the space be?
 

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We have corrals off both horse entryways to the barn. Makes it handy to be able to shut them into a smaller lot when vet or farrier is coming. We don't really have stalls just an enclosed lean-to that has gates I can close to divide them at feeding time. Any other time the gates are back against the wall and they are free to come in and out at will. I find this set up very convenient. Yes to dividing feed and tack room, especially if you are going to store some hay in it. It will keep your tack a lot cleaner. I might steal a couple of feet from the feed room and add it to the tack room if it was me but I have a lot of tack. LOL Nice barn!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My preference is separate. Just always made more sense. If it is large enough so feed can stay on one side and tack on the other then if you plant on heating or cooling, even dehumidifying then there is benefit to one space. How rodent tight will the space be?
For the tack/feed rooms we are going to have them completely enclosed with a combo of steel/tile on the walls, floor and ceiling to prevent anything from chewing through along with actual doors that can properly seal. Any food will be in airtight containers as well.
 

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I have a combined tack , feed room. I hate it. Feed spills and if you miss some it encourages mice. My had shed is separate away from the horses by 20 or more feet, But I do not get snow. You will want room to maneuver that tractor, and if you have to drag or use the bucket to get into the stall you will find it a tight fit. I like the ideas of corrals off a stall, but I would make them wider for the end pens and have a gate large enough to get the tractor into the pens so you can drag and add dirt etc.
 

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What size stalls? My barn is 60x80, tack room, wash rack with hot/cold water (doubles as a groom rack with cross ties), feed area (all grain is in 55 gal drums with lids so no critters can get in the feed. Have six 12x12 stalls and two 12x22 stalls one with a closed circuit camera for foaling. Don't have any attached runs as I don't like them. Light over every stall and down the alley way.
 

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First off... WELCOME to the Forum!!
I'll offer my opinion at each question in your post.
Hi everyone! We just moved to our new 30 acre farm in Iowa and it is pretty much a blank slate other than the pre-existing house and 32x60' workshop. We are in the process of getting quotes for a 42'x70' barn to be built this summer and I have a couple things I'm not sure on since we are still in the planning stages trying to figure the floor plan etc. I have included a picture of the floor plan we most likely will base the barn off of and an exterior design we liked.

1. We found a pre-made floor plan that we like, but it has a seperate 16'x14' tack room and a 16'x14' feed room. Since this will be our own private barn I'm wondering if there are any real benefits to a separate tack and feed room? Has anyone found with their private barns that they loved having them separate? Should we maybe just combine the two for a larger 32'x14' tack/feed room? My family's barn growing up didn't even have a tack or feed room so I'm not 100% sure which one I would prefer馃槄
I would keep the areas separate so you can "de-humidify" the air if needed to prevent mold on your tack and more importantly, it is amazing how much dust and dirt is associated with feed that will then make filth to your tack.
Also, a way to lock, yes lock your tack room is not a bad idea since your animals may bring unwanted attention to your home keeping tack safeguarded against theft or use unapproved helps defeat those in the wrong.

2. The aisle on the floor plan is 14'. We just bought a little 26 hp Kubota that will be used for the horse barn. It fits just fine through the 10' wide workshop doors and I think the extra 4' will be enough to get around if we need to walk by, but does anyone have a 14' aisle and like it? Too small or just right? I know for sure I don't want to go any smaller.
The width is so you can pass safely with or use machinery since the barn you picture has a loft for potential hay storage, allows a hay truck entry through the barn for delivery too.
I would leave it if you can and if a problem nothing less than 12' so "working use" is better achieved.


3. I was thinking 12' wide lean-to's off of both 70' sides of the barn. Is 12' a good width for a lean-to? Has anyone found that they preferred a wider or shorter width for a lean-to?
I would do nothing less than 10'...one side appears stalls so a nice overhang for weather protection should you choose to lock/block off stalls during the day.
The other side will offer protection for your tractor and implements and horse trailer which = longevity for your expensive tools/toys.


4. My next question is about paddocks off of the stalls. For those that have them do you like having them? My horses will be stalled only for inclement weather, emergencies and for feeding. I am still contemplating adding 14'x20' individual paddocks off of each stall for more room when they have to be stalled. We will be for sure already adding exterior dutch doors for safety reasons, extra air flow and ease of access to individual stalls.
I would incorporate that to the design as having a small sacrifice area for various needs is great!!
When a animal needs confining from injury or for other needs it is nice to be able to offer sunshine and fresh air.
Personal choice if you want, use or not.


5. For flooring we are thinking a concrete pad and then Ramm's Thurobed Mattresses in each stall and rubber brick pavers in all other areas of the barn. My question is has anyone used and liked the Thurobed's in their barn? Also does anyone have the Rubber Brick pavers and like them?
I don't have any experience with stall mattresses but have read elsewhere those who did, they love them.
Easy to clean, horses loved them they would go for that expense again and wished they had $$ to do it from the get-go as you are. The mention of shavings/bedding saver was also mentioned..

Are you referring to a concrete pad the barn is built on with the mattress pads on top of that?
I would not bother with rubber pavers myself as they are more work but would do large mats in grooming areas and perforated ones in wash stalls for drainage, otherwise a textured finish to floor gives decent traction.
The mats I refer to are about 4' wide and 12' long solid piece, and super heavy to move you will be using your tractor to place or move them {where you purchase them I do not know}..


6. Ventilation. We are planning for (3) 4'x4' cupolas, exterior dutch doors on every stall, sliding barn end doors on both ends of the barn and (3) windows on both barn ends (two on each side on the door and one above the door). My question is should we also install ceiling fans or just add stall fans for more ventilation/air flow? or both? I want to make sure this barn is as airy as possible for the hot summer months.
Once you start with fans you must also be aware of clearance height appropriate if placed in aisles and stalls....
I would also be careful about those windows on barn ends as what can touch them {stall} and who sees in, along with added heat/cold transfer.
Sliding doors at barn ends will give a great airflow when added to dutch doors and high ceiling and cupolas...
If you have a ceiling for over barn hay storage though think about those cupolas and the amount of air flow they give and where it shall be.
You need air flow, but barn design and land placement is going to dictate more what you do and why.
I would add a human walk through door so not always having to open those huge doors is possible.
In your planning also plan a way to fully block escape of a loose horse through those open doors {drop in fence board} when hot in summer the doors open allow cooling night air exchange....


7. Eave lights. We were considering adding eave lights along both 70' sides of the barn. Does anyone have them and like them? Any cons? We want to try and maximize on the natural light as much as possible.
Horses need night and dark to rest in...some soft lighting is fine, but quiet and shadowy if you must.
Bright LED lights that at a flip of a switch you can selectively flood areas when needed, as needed would be more a must than "scenery" lighting for me.
Make those lights, at least walking light be accessible from the house to barn area for nighttime forays to check on a animal not feeling well.
They make those skylight tube things for homes that allow in tons of natural light might be worth looking into but not sure of practicality in a barn atmosphere or longevity either.
The only part of things I will say is the layout to me is unfriendly.
A feed stall needs in middle of the stall location so shorter distance to travel carrying feed scoops/buckets makes it easier on you...add in mess of hay dropping is less distance traveled.
If you can incorporate hay drops into your stalls from the hayloft it might be something to think about if you would have very easy access of a staircase not ladder and a large enough loft to not cover the drop doors and prevent use...a expense to incur but can work and also offer ventilation of heat rises when using those cupolas you like.

Your wash stall for me would be on a corner of the barn so if it floods it not flood the barn but out the door..unless you are doing shows during winter though in your climate a outdoor wash rack is what I would want and not in my barn at all.
Few times in winter is it necessary or advisable to soak a horse to the skin bathing does.
Heated water access might work if that is a goal too better from that location.
Here your window idea would offer you extra natural lighting.
A wash stall could also double as a vet/farrier use area.
Strategically placed electrical outlets in this area to me are a must for injury site prep cleanup makes most sense to do in a area where supplies are easily at hand.
Placing wash stall on outside wall with adjoining feed stall wall allows use of plumbing centrally located and to the hydrant close by too...but winter cold needs to strongly be addressed or frozen & busted pipes you shall have in your bathroom shown.

Water hydrant of frost free if you live where it freezes would be placed center of the barn so hoses are kept to minimum length and or piping of water to spigots is also shorter distances. Ability to shut off and drain away is a must for you.
All electrical inside conduit so no chewing by vermin happens.
Many outlets all GFCI so no extension cords are needed in the barn is safest.
When you get to the stall fan issue, hard-wired and sealed motor are non-negotiable to me but a must..

When you discuss location of the barn, find high ground and then make it higher to gather the cooling winds and catch the suns rays warming wanted in winter. Your local AG department should be able to offer great insight about this.
A high pad, and would be larger than the structure itself so water drainage is away and not tempted to stand close to the barn creating mud in warm weather and icing in cold allows your horses to go outside in near any kind of climate conditions.You don't need a high pad, but a graduated slope works to carry away the wet year round..if money is no object I would do a 50' perimeter of the barn exterior dimensions to assure good sloping drainage away...

Fencing is a must and with property of this size perimeter fence is a must and then a second fence inside so if a escapee they not get off of but get contained within your land safe till you get to them to bring home where they belong..
Gates connecting pasture to pasture large enough to take a brush-hog or other needed implements, trucks & trailers can be accomplished easily but do also include some walk through smaller so not needing to always open 12'+ gates allows you to control the horse herd movement safely and easier.
Because you have a 26HP tractor does not mean that is what you shall keep....that is 5' maybe 6' implements.
Kind of think you will be upsizing to around 40HP, that means large implements in width so larger size in aisle and gate openings plan for now or regret.
If you bought a bucket loader, you will be glad for the extra width clearance in the barn and around the property doing farm chores.

These are some manufacturers who might give you some other ideas to incorporate or not in your plans...
Don't not consider a pole barn that allows you many options of a continuous roof or several roof heights and finishing underneath as you wish...

{I have a pole barn my husband & I finished ourselves..When we bought we were told using multiples of 12' is cheaper in lumber costs to add to our structure if that helps you at all. So 48'x72' might be cheaper to build than 40'x70' and give you more space to plan/play with.}
Modular barns also are a huge draw today as they can be made elsewhere and delivered in sections, put together and finished in less than a weeks time...
Your pad & concrete work needs done and cured first of course to withstand the considerable load you will be placing on it but that is true no matter what kind of barn or who it is constructed by happens.

Enjoy your barn project and consider making a journal here to document the progress as your dream on paper becomes a reality. :)
馃惔...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What size stalls? My barn is 60x80, tack room, wash rack with hot/cold water (doubles as a groom rack with cross ties), feed area (all grain is in 55 gal drums with lids so no critters can get in the feed. Have six 12x12 stalls and two 12x22 stalls one with a closed circuit camera for foaling. Don't have any attached runs as I don't like them. Light over every stall and down the alley way.
The stalls will be all 14'x14' except for the one area that's 12'x14' I am thinking about turning into an additional stall. I like the idea of lights above every stall and down the aisle!
 

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I鈥檝e had combined and separate Feed and Tack rooms and found having them separate worked way better.
Not sure if you can tweak the plans but 12 x 12 is plenty big enough 6 horses if you maximize storage space using kitchen base and wall units.

What I do find really useful is having a separate area for shavings and tools and a separate area for blanket storage
 

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The stalls will be all 14'x14' except for the one area that's 12'x14' I am thinking about turning into an additional stall. I like the idea of lights above every stall and down the aisle!
If you do this might I suggest each stall has a light switch so you not have to light the entire barn length...
And do sectional lighting might also work...again, not needing to light the entire thing.
And.... light switch at either end that can shut off the aisle lights lit so not walking through a dark aisle-way.
馃惔 ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
First off... WELCOME to the Forum!!
I'll offer my opinion at each question in your post.

The only part of things I will say is the layout to me is unfriendly.
A feed stall needs in middle of the stall location so shorter distance to travel carrying feed scoops/buckets makes it easier on you...add in mess of hay dropping is less distance traveled.
If you can incorporate hay drops into your stalls from the hayloft it might be something to think about if you would have very easy access of a staircase not ladder and a large enough loft to not cover the drop doors and prevent use...a expense to incur but can work and also offer ventilation of heat rises when using those cupolas you like.

Your wash stall for me would be on a corner of the barn so if it floods it not flood the barn but out the door..unless you are doing shows during winter though in your climate a outdoor wash rack is what I would want and not in my barn at all.
Few times in winter is it necessary or advisable to soak a horse to the skin bathing does.
Heated water access might work if that is a goal too better from that location.
Here your window idea would offer you extra natural lighting.
A wash stall could also double as a vet/farrier use area.
Strategically placed electrical outlets in this area to me are a must for injury site prep cleanup makes most sense to do in a area where supplies are easily at hand.
Placing wash stall on outside wall with adjoining feed stall wall allows use of plumbing centrally located and to the hydrant close by too...but winter cold needs to strongly be addressed or frozen & busted pipes you shall have in your bathroom shown.

Water hydrant of frost free if you live where it freezes would be placed center of the barn so hoses are kept to minimum length and or piping of water to spigots is also shorter distances. Ability to shut off and drain away is a must for you.
All electrical inside conduit so no chewing by vermin happens.
Many outlets all GFCI so no extension cords are needed in the barn is safest.
When you get to the stall fan issue, hard-wired and sealed motor are non-negotiable to me but a must..

When you discuss location of the barn, find high ground and then make it higher to gather the cooling winds and catch the suns rays warming wanted in winter. Your local AG department should be able to offer great insight about this.
A high pad, and would be larger than the structure itself so water drainage is away and not tempted to stand close to the barn creating mud in warm weather and icing in cold allows your horses to go outside in near any kind of climate conditions.You don't need a high pad, but a graduated slope works to carry away the wet year round..if money is no object I would do a 50' perimeter of the barn exterior dimensions to assure good sloping drainage away...

Fencing is a must and with property of this size perimeter fence is a must and then a second fence inside so if a escapee they not get off of but get contained within your land safe till you get to them to bring home where they belong..
Gates connecting pasture to pasture large enough to take a brush-hog or other needed implements, trucks & trailers can be accomplished easily but do also include some walk through smaller so not needing to always open 12'+ gates allows you to control the horse herd movement safely and easier.
Because you have a 26HP tractor does not mean that is what you shall keep....that is 5' maybe 6' implements.
Kind of think you will be upsizing to around 40HP, that means large implements in width so larger size in aisle and gate openings plan for now or regret.
If you bought a bucket loader, you will be glad for the extra width clearance in the barn and around the property doing farm chores.

These are some manufacturers who might give you some other ideas to incorporate or not in your plans...
Don't not consider a pole barn that allows you many options of a continuous roof or several roof heights and finishing underneath as you wish...

{I have a pole barn my husband & I finished ourselves..When we bought we were told using multiples of 12' is cheaper in lumber costs to add to our structure if that helps you at all. So 48'x72' might be cheaper to build than 40'x70' and give you more space to plan/play with.}
Modular barns also are a huge draw today as they can be made elsewhere and delivered in sections, put together and finished in less than a weeks time...
Your pad & concrete work needs done and cured first of course to withstand the considerable load you will be placing on it but that is true no matter what kind of barn or who it is constructed by happens.

Enjoy your barn project and consider making a journal here to document the progress as your dream on paper becomes a reality. :)
馃惔...
Wow so many great points and things to consider! I definitely think your ideas of moving the wash stall to the corner and feed to the middle are going to be changes we will make along with extended the elevated pad around the barn. For the perimeter fencing we were debating between Option 1: Five strand fence with 4 lines being poly-coated hot wire and the top being a wide vinyl "hot rail" like in the attached picture. Or Option 2: No Climb horse fence with a line of coated hot wire 6 inches from the ground and vinyl "hot rail at the top". All fence posts will be the larger round wooden posts as well. Any other ideas are definitely welcome too. Money isn't really an issue especially when it comes to fencing, we would like it done correctly the first time. As for the tractor, I definitely agree with the larger horse power and we will be buying another tractor in the next 6 months. We are still going to keep the smaller one for mowing around the barn, mucking stalls etc. just because it's easier to maneuver in smaller areas. I am also contemplating making the aisle 16' in case we need to bring the larger tractor through.
 

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As for the tractor, I definitely agree with the larger horse power and we will be buying another tractor in the next 6 months. We are still going to keep the smaller one for mowing around the barn, mucking stalls etc. just because it's easier to maneuver in smaller areas. I am also contemplating making the aisle 16' in case we need to bring the larger tractor through.
Depending upon how large and amenities of the tractor...make sure you have height clearance appropriate to bring it in the barn. You would have width clearance but watch the height.
To big can be as bad as to small trying to do a job efficiently.
For instance,..
We now have think it is 33HP, in actuality it is a 39 HP tractor engine with restrictor plate...fit is perfect for our needs.
We had a 50HP but it was to big and made more work than helped..
I would love to have the reach and power of a larger tractor though.
A 1 yard bucket or more when moving dirt, lifting power for those enormous round rolls, and a floating rear PTO would be heavenly for my ring/ground maintenance needs..
So many things to research and make decisions on...:rolleyes:
馃惔....
 
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