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hello, i am looking to buy this horse, she seems amazing for me and what i want to do, but the only problem is,
seller has told me that she has 'VERY slight
 

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From what I understand, navicular is no longer considered, in all cases, to be a terrible uncurable problem.

If you're really interested in her, get a good vet to do a PPE and arrange for a very good farrier (one who gets along with vets; that's not as common as you might think) to be out there at the same time, so you can figure out what a plan for her might look like.
 

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Pass - I have a horse with Navicular - it really means heel pain but you have to find the cause and some are non-repairable like our mare. I have had the best barefoot farriers work on her, tried natural balance shoes, tried wedges, tried Previcoxx and Osphos and she is still lame and worse than she has ever been. her X-rays don't show much change to the Navicular bone but the issue has become progressive.
 

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I would not pass necessarily just because she was labelled as such, I'd want more info for a start. Including what it was you planned for her, her age, x-rays, etc.

BUT that you yourself don't know about this 'disease', that you've given no details, except the seller telling you it's 'very slight'(what does that mean?) So I'm guessing you're not very experienced generally, I'd suggest you pass too
 

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A young girl at my yard is having her heart broken by her first horse due to navicular. She is a lovely 16-year old, very polite, loves her family, good student, generally happy and avoidant of 21st century vices. She really doesn’t deserve it. I feel so bad for them both. The amount of tears and crushed dreams... not to mention money which her family doesn’t really have. The girl’s mom took on a second job to try and treat this horse. They spent a lot of money and the horse is just not getting any better, it’s getting worse. I really wouldn’t wish this on anyone, horse or human.
 

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First off you need xrays. You cannot tell if its navicular without x rays. You can guess . Slight navicular .. does that mean the coffin bone has rotated? does that mean her hoof is dishing ? does that mean sometimes she is lame ? Id you have the money for special shoes and pads and wont be working the horse hard, and really really love the horse , I would still pass. It is expensive to keep the pads and shoes and dealing with the problems that arise from the pads and shoes and lame days , I would find a sound horse.
 

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There's not enough info to base a decision off of. Navicular is a pretty broad diagnosis despite being "slight".

For me it would be based off of vet work- other than the pictures/diagnosis the sellers vet provided, a true lameness podiatrist vet. A good farrier in your corner that works with your vet, age of horse, and what you intend to do with said horse.
 

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First off you need xrays. You cannot tell if its navicular without x rays.
Depends on your definition. 'They' used to differentiate between 'navicular syndrome'(unexplained heel pain) and 'navicular disease'(with bony changes). These days however, I think it's a general thing in professional circles to refer to it all as 'navicular syndrome' but xrays are needed to see if/how much it's progressed to bony changes. You cannot tell from xrays, what damage there is, if it hasn't yet reached bone remodelling & calcification. Soft tissue damage, which if chronic, is what causes the 'bony changes' needs MRI or ultrasound to be seen.

does that mean sometimes she is lame ? Id you have the money for special shoes and pads
For the seller to admit to 'slight navicular', I imagine the horse is indeed clinically lame, at least sporadically, and has been seen/diagnosed by the vet about it, be that with or without rads done.

In the past, 'navicular' was considered a bit of a mystery, incurable and progressive. Therefore, palliative measures, such as bar shoes, pads, wedging heels higher, were considered the only option, to be used until the horse was 'too far gone' when palliative no longer worked & the horse was put down. Trouble is, we know now that those palliative measures do indeed cause progression of the 'disease'.

These days however, we know that there is indeed (generally) hope for soundness, and that with the right management, while depending on the damage already done, we may not be able to repair/rebuild the foot completely(can't reverse bony changes for eg), but if not greatly improve, we can generally at very least maintain the current level of soundness & prevent it progressing any further. Then it becomes only those cases which are already 'too far gone', or the horse is too old or such, where we need to resort to palliative only tactics.
 

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Before I would consider a navicular labelled horse, I would be well versed in hoof anatomy or have a farrier I would trust with my life to tell me yay or nay
 

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Some people like to take on animals with health problems and are willing to accept what comes with that - the additional costs, unexpected expenses, limitations and problems - for the knowledge that they are giving the animal a better life. A question to ask yourself (and no need to respond to this here): Are you really that kind of person?

This horse may end up needing expensive vet and farrier care and being mostly or fully unridable - does that prospect also interest you or do you ultimately want a horse you can ride and enjoy? For me I would pass.
 

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Reading all of the above replies gives a lot of good information...
I would like to add....
You should be asking for past xrays done of the horse to be evaluated by YOUR lameness specialist vet.
Youwill need to take current "new" fresh xrays for comaprison of improvement, decline or what is occurring that it is labeled "slight" by the seller.
Where I am from originally, {L.I., N.Y.} to have a horse shod in any way therapeutically costs BIG money.... starting about $250 for front shoes and they are reset/redone every 6 weeks faithfully.
Navicular is not something that ever is cured....no, it if you are lucky is managed well, but it is still costly and going to take a toll on said animal eventually cause damages to the inner guts of the hoof do that.
I live in Florida now, the cost depending upon farrier and how precise a job is done and what needs done can also vary the price...but for just 2 front shoes with no special anything for my horse who is not afflicted with navicular costs $150 every 5 weeks....
Do you really want to start a ownership knowing the cost for shoeing which is a must by a specialist is going to be nearer$150 for the trim then add a whole lot more for the actual shoes and that knowledge ....
And...it will never end....keep feeding the cash register as this is a progressive syndrome and I have only heard of one horse near me that going barefoot worked for and that animal is a pasture pet so not sure how well it truly worked.

I would also nail the owner on exactly what "very slight" means............
Has the horse been nerved? Heels, partial, full....you better know cause when those nasty nerves regenerate you have a basket-full of issues facing you that there may not be a remedy for this time and the animal truly hurts in terrible pain & discomfort.
Very slight to some of us "ole-school" is noticeable in how they walk, stand, place the hoof....and you can pick one out of a line-up...
If you are thinking of this for a show horse, don't, just don't.
If this is going to only be your partner for trail riding and you don't mind days when you want to ride and can't cause the horse is limping around....
Personally, if you want a horse with limited access to use, a declining future and less chance of resale value or unloading of a lame horse...
I truly would pass....
You're looking for....at this point you look with your brain and not your heart.
There will be other horses, sound horses who will check off all those boxes and be "the-one" if you continue to look.
If you pass and continue to look and can't find....then the fact the horse has "very slight" navicular would be a huge price drop from what is being asked...never would I pay much for a horse with a limited span of usefulness as navicular horses have.
That is my opinion and may be "old" and out of fashion but it is a honest assessment of you buy, you buy a hornets nest of issues you know about, costs tenfold, days unusable for a "slight"....yea, no!
I'm sure it is not what you want to hear but when so many are saying pass, pass, pass....there is a reason for us saying it and the biggest is trying to save you heart-ache.
🐴
 

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X-rays are a good suggestion but they only show bony changes. Navicular can be caused due to soft tissue changes that only an MRI will show. Many Navicular horses (like mine) have great X-rays and are still chronically lame. Please proceed with caution - pain killers only last so long and have other side effects
 

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My sister’s mare is 22 and was diagnosed with navicular when she was about 7. My BIL is a farrier so that was helpful Mylie (the mare) has been a successful performance horse her entire life. She wasn’t able to barrel race anymore (which was what my sister purchased her for), but she has performed on a rodeo drill team for going on seventeen years now. Some horses with proper maintenance can have very successful careers.


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I've just bought a horse that 99% has cushings, getting tested is basically a formality She badly damaged tendons and ligaments in both hinds on more than one occasion. She's only 14 and I mean you can see the scar tissue, her back legs look puffy but they are healed. I will also be investigating her legs and feet even though she so far is appearing very sound for just light work. Her teeth.. oof. They're not good.

But I bought her with the expectation that she might never be rideable and might cost me money well into her 30's if I do things right 🙏. I am in a position I can offer her a better life and for me her personality and clever little brain bring me such delight. For the record I have my first mare for all my riding adventures so it wasn't as big a deal for me. I would not buy a horse with navicular without being 100% prepared for the reality that the horse might have to either have thousands invested just to keep them passably sound at best (coz each case is different) or that they might just be retired early. Only you can really make that decision but with navicular you need to think really hard about the worst case scenarios.

Up to you. It is very hard when the heart is involved. Can you afford a second horse for your riding needs? If not then I advise against it. But you also might be OK maintaining this horse for the rest of its life even if it means you sacrifice riding. I know if tomorrow both my mares were unrideable it wouldn't change a thing for me, I will love them until the end of their days.
 

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I lease a "perfect for me" Western Pleasure gelding. He's a wonderful example of an equine gentleman and has won me 2 buckles. There have been many days I could not ride because he was lame, missing shoe or both. He gets over $120 a month in suppliments and equioxx, aluminum shoes. If he loses one he's broken leg lame for days after shoe is replaced. While I have been able to maintain him for the last 2 years with easy long walks and a few more strenuous trailrides, please pass on this horse we are discussing. The cost could be prohibitive and the outcome...whether you horse is rideable for 6 months or 10 years is a crapshoot. Each horse is different. There's lots out there whose xrays are horrendous and have never taken a lame step.

There are wonderful saintly horses out there...keep looking.
 
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