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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some advice I’m a 25yr old mother of a 3yr old and 7mth old. I’m wanting to retire my warmblood x whose 26yrs old to just an occasional ride once in a blue moon. So with that in my mind I was thinking of maybe buying an ottb but want to know others opinions if they were me would they. Ive been riding for 14yrs and before I had my boys I was doing low level eventing and was jumping a metre before my boy hit 20. So now I’m wanting to get back competing but not sure what to do it to buy the ottb or get maybe one that has some training after racing instead to work on as I don’t think I’ll be able to afford or find one that has been competing in my price range.
 

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The #1 problem with OTTBs in my opinion is that it is very difficult to find one with good enough legs and hooves to stay sound enough for work. A majority that are bred for racing have serious conformational defects. That doesn't even include track related injuries. These things are expensive to find and treat, and even if treated your sound horse may only be suitable for light work.

The #2 problem is one that most people seem to think of first, which is that many OTTBs have an excitable temperament that makes them suitable for more experienced riders and handlers.

If you want a good TB, I suggest buying one that has been bred as a sport horse from sport horse breeding rather than a racehorse, with attention to good conformation and temperament.
 

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I like getting TBs off the track. I prefer they've had a little time ast a track. They are used to everything!

I do recommend a pre-purchase exam (PPE).

For my purposes I look for horses with good bone, in addition to good attitude.

And I noticed I differ from others I read about on here by riding immediately. They already know how to stop, go, turn right or left... We start exploring.

Some TB "rescues" don't charge exorbitant prices and have put a few rides on them.
They also sell, rather than adopt, and you get a bill of sale.

I hope you find a wonderful horse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The #1 problem with OTTBs in my opinion is that it is very difficult to find one with good enough legs and hooves to stay sound enough for work. A majority that are bred for racing have serious conformational defects. That doesn't even include track related injuries. These things are expensive to find and treat, and even if treated your sound horse may only be suitable for light work.

The #2 problem is one that most people seem to think of first, which is that many OTTBs have an excitable temperament that makes them suitable for more experienced riders and handlers.

If you want a good TB, I suggest buying one that has been bred as a sport horse from sport horse breeding rather than a racehorse, with attention to good conformation and temperament.
Makes sense if I had the money I’d be buying another warmblood but my partner won’t give me atleast enough for that 😢
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I like getting TBs off the track. I prefer they've had a little time ast a track. They are used to everything!

I do recommend a pre-purchase exam (PPE).

For my purposes I look for horses with good bone, in addition to good attitude.

And I noticed I differ from others I read about on here by riding immediately. They already know how to stop, go, turn right or left... We start exploring.

Some TB "rescues" don't charge exorbitant prices and have put a few rides on them.
They also sell, rather than adopt, and you get a bill of sale.

I hope you find a wonderful horse.
Yeah I just ain’t sure if it’s smart with the two little boys so undecided. I’m getting told do it but then my family say I might as well not and stop riding until boys are older yet that’ll just be like taking the best part of me away. But my partner is happy to go get a new horse tomorrow haha
 

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Yeah I just ain’t sure if it’s smart with the two little boys so undecided. I’m getting told do it but then my family say I might as well not and stop riding until boys are older yet that’ll just be like taking the best part of me away. But my partner is happy to go get a new horse tomorrow haha
I understand that. There was a period of time, when mine were young, that I couldn't have a personal horse. I found other avenues for horse time. And eventually accepted an elderly mare for us.

You'll find your answer
 

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I went to some ottb retirement sale event a month or so ago, out of curiosity. SOME of the trainers actually seemed 100% up front about soundness issues. I noticed a lot of bad feet and i don't think i saw a solid bowel movement from the lot. It was hosted at a track so all the horse were very amped up. Every one had a stud chain, and were being walked a few laps every so often to try and chill them out. So I'd put that on the list of things to work on before going to a show.

Another anecdotal case like a few days later i was shadowing a farrier and one of her old clients just brought home an ottb. The farrier was pulling the shoes and casting to transition to barefoot. He was actually extremely calm and had been at his new home for several days. Farrier seemed initially pleased her client didn't bring home a crazy mess. Well we started pulling the shoes and it became immediately apparent that he physically could not stand up on 3 legs for long and would start to fall over. It took several people holding this very wobbly but well behaved big boy up. He had noticeable NPA in the back feet. And the owner told us he was standing weird in the stall and in the trailer. Sounded like she was describing a laminitic stance. Anyways i noticed he was posted for sale last week and I've been a little afraid to ask what happened.

So just to say proceed with caution, and get a PPE.
 

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Friends of mine have had a few different OTTBs, all of which had soundness problems.

One friend got three in a row... two to three thousand bucks each to buy. Then all the vet and farrier bills, then a few hundred for the final vetting and euthanasia. All three had to be put down within a couple years. One had tendon scarring that caused a limp and constant pain, another had cervical stenosis, and the third bone spur on the hock that had extended into a calcified mess that was inoperable. All were nice, athletic looking horses.

My OTTB has stifle issues. He was free but I've spent quite a bit on vetting, and he has to take daily Equioxx to stay sound. He can't jump or gallop under saddle. Arthritis already at 13.

I'd say first you need to plan to treat the ulcers most OTTBs come with. Then the hoof issues, which also might mean special farrier care. Diet can be tricky, and it can take months to get them digesting properly with good intestinal balance.

Not trying to discourage, but there are lots of hidden costs with TBs.
 

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I see by your flag shown you are in Australia...
OTTB are absolutely in your area....
As with any other animal judge the animal in front of you as a individual not grouped together.
Just as OTTB have had bad features possible so does every other breed or grade animal out there....
The Thoroughbred is still a wonderful versatile athlete who can more than hold its own against any other breed of horse out and about....
I would myself far rather a Thoroughbred than just about any other breed in existence....versatile is a understatement and they have proven their abilities thousands of times over. ;)

So I think finding a horse who is off the track is a wonderful idea, yes now!
You won't have endless time to work the animal daily, but you will have time stolen here and there a few days a week when you can run away from your kids and do what gives you joy as adult...a young horse needs time to just be a horse in a field doing what it wants if you have space to provide that.
A OTTB has been exposed to so much being in training, then at the racetrack they are either explosive, reactive and "bananas" or look at and diagnose first mentally.
OTTB have been ridden, so backed and are taught basics of control...and....the better trainers often do a lot more than basics I have found by sitting on many a nice OTTB 2 days off the track...{fresh from gelding needing exercise}
Take the time to rest their mind and just enjoy each others company with no demands on either of you.
Many OTTB can be young, but not all are...
Some are near free, some are a bit more depending upon the quality of the animal and if any new training has been started with the animal.
To lump together all OTTB to me is wrong.
Just as there are good and bad traits in every living thing, so goes it with horses.
Indeed look for a animal that fits what you want in a animal....it is only you that needs your needs met, not mine or anyone elses idea of "perfect" as you know what works for you and your future goals.
I would also say a PPE from a vet is advisable and be a vet of your choice you trust to give you your information honestly.
Enjoy your search. :)
🐴...
 
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