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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My gelding is a non-sweater. He has been on One AC for several months as I live in Florida and the summer has been brutally hot and humid. The One AC supplement helps somewhat as my guy does sweat on his chest and neck. But he doesn't sweat anywhere else on his body. I try to take whatever precautions I can, such as using a fan when he's in his stall, making sure he always has fresh, clean water available, hosing him before and after a ride, greatly reducing his work during these hot and humid summer months, riding only in the evening, and not riding at all when the heat index is high. When I do ride, it's mostly walk/trot. I haven't cantered him in quite a while because I don't want him to get overheated.

Even with all these measures in place, my guy still seems like he doesn't want to be ridden. I've looked into saddle fit and possible hoof issues but it doesn't seem to be either one of those. I use a very mild bitless bridle so I doubt it has anything to do with that.

Can anhidrosis affect a horse's behavior? I ask because this horse had a good work ethic before summer started. He is still well behaved for the most part, but he just seems agitated, grumpy, and less-than-thrilled to be ridden these past couple of months. In a separate forum, I had posted about how he wants to head back to the barn soon after I get on him. Some people said he was barn sour, but I don't think that's it. I guess I didn't make the connection until yesterday that his grumpiness started when the heat and humidity skyrocketed. Or maybe they are not related at all and the timing is just a coincidence. Any thoughts? Does anyone have a non-sweater whose behavior is affected by the problem?
 

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When you add temperature and humidity together and get anything over 120* you need to take heed and watch closely, over 150* and you have hit the danger zone...
This is on normal horses who sweat a river in these conditions, not your horse who has a overheating issue that is life threatening to him...
Today the temperature in central Florida is 95 degrees...we have 75% humidity + today...add them together and you have 170 temperature values outside..
You have surpassed danger to extremes and asking for unthinkable to occur...honest.

I live in the state too and it is just brutal outside, period.
I walked across my yard to check my horses and am nearly dead from the intense heat and sun pounding on my hat covered head.

My horses are wringing wet with sweat, so bad are they soaked it concerns me when they eat and digest their food how much heat their body makes doing required to live things like eating.

I am not riding, barely making them move eating in the shade of the barn with fans whirring.
Can the temperature affect them...
Does it affect you? It sure does me.
There honestly is no time of day or night to ride safely with the high humidity factored in right now...
Dead of night it was 81 degrees on my thermometer last night without humidity factored in is to hot.
On a horse with inability or reduced ability to cool his body by intense sweating...you are playing with a keg of dynamite.
Your horse is trying to tell you he can not endure much more...
His attitude is all he can muster to show you, his way of begging you to leave him alone to cope the best way he can.
One AC, add a can/bottle of dark beer poured over his food each feeding is said to also help the body to sweat...fans and honestly, just leave him alone in front of a fan to cope the best he can is best.
Till the temperature and humidity drop considerably, anything more than eat or breathing for extended periods of time as our current weather conditions are is asking for a emergent vet visit and possibly not a outcome you want..
The weather should change in about 3 - 4 weeks, start riding then, but when your horse has a issue of not being able to cool himself you run a very high risk of health damages to him he can never recover from riding in this...
To me, it isn't worth it for my horses sake.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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I’m in southern Middle Tennessee which is bad for humidity but nothing compared to Florida.

My horses are mid-20’s and retired. They have been growing winter coat since mid-August and have been mopey ever since. Mid-August is late, sometimes they have started shedding in late July:(

Unless you keep your horse clipped, maybe the addition of growing his winter coat, is affecting him. Even if he is clipped, he still has the genetic seasonal fluctuations of insulin and glucose to adapt to winter.

His could be off somewhat, so another thought is the very early onset of Cushings. How old is he? Horses as young as ten have been diagnosed with PPID; it’s not common that young but Cushings is a failure of the pituitary gland, so it might be worth your time to have an ACTH test done:)

They have established Fall markers, so testing in the Fall has become more accurate:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I’m in southern Middle Tennessee which is bad for humidity but nothing compared to Florida.

My horses are mid-20’s and retired. They have been growing winter coat since mid-August and have been mopey ever since. Mid-August is late, sometimes they have started shedding in late July:(

Unless you keep your horse clipped, maybe the addition of growing his winter coat, is affecting him. Even if he is clipped, he still has the genetic seasonal fluctuations of insulin and glucose to adapt to winter.

His could be off somewhat, so another thought is the very early onset of Cushings. How old is he? Horses as young as ten have been diagnosed with PPID; it’s not common that young but Cushings is a failure of the pituitary gland, so it might be worth your time to have an ACTH test done:)

They have established Fall markers, so testing in the Fall has become more accurate:)
My guy is an 11 year old Hanoverian. That seems young for Cushings, but if his behavior continues into fall after the temperatures come down and the humidity is greatly reduced, I will look into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When you add temperature and humidity together and get anything over 120* you need to take heed and watch closely, over 150* and you have hit the danger zone...
This is on normal horses who sweat a river in these conditions, not your horse who has a overheating issue that is life threatening to him...
Today the temperature in central Florida is 95 degrees...we have 75% humidity + today...add them together and you have 170 temperature values outside..
You have surpassed danger to extremes and asking for unthinkable to occur...honest.

I live in the state too and it is just brutal outside, period.
I walked across my yard to check my horses and am nearly dead from the intense heat and sun pounding on my hat covered head.

My horses are wringing wet with sweat, so bad are they soaked it concerns me when they eat and digest their food how much heat their body makes doing required to live things like eating.

I am not riding, barely making them move eating in the shade of the barn with fans whirring.
Can the temperature affect them...
Does it affect you? It sure does me.
There honestly is no time of day or night to ride safely with the high humidity factored in right now...
Dead of night it was 81 degrees on my thermometer last night without humidity factored in is to hot.
On a horse with inability or reduced ability to cool his body by intense sweating...you are playing with a keg of dynamite.
Your horse is trying to tell you he can not endure much more...
His attitude is all he can muster to show you, his way of begging you to leave him alone to cope the best way he can.
One AC, add a can/bottle of dark beer poured over his food each feeding is said to also help the body to sweat...fans and honestly, just leave him alone in front of a fan to cope the best he can is best.
Till the temperature and humidity drop considerably, anything more than eat or breathing for extended periods of time as our current weather conditions are is asking for a emergent vet visit and possibly not a outcome you want..
The weather should change in about 3 - 4 weeks, start riding then, but when your horse has a issue of not being able to cool himself you run a very high risk of health damages to him he can never recover from riding in this...
To me, it isn't worth it for my horses sake.
<img style="max-width:100%;" src="http://www.horseforum.com/images/smilies/runninghorse2.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Runninghorse2" class="inlineimg" />...
. Thank you for clarifying the formula of adding actual temperature plus humidity. I had heard of the 150 rule, and it absolutely makes sense. But then I think of the lesson barns across Florida that continue to give lessons all summer, the Thoroughbreds racing all summer at Gulfstream, the thousands of trail riders who ride all summer...how do they all manage? I guess it is like you said. Normal horses can handle those activities. In addition to the 11 year old Hanoverian who has sweating issues, I also have a 12 year old OTTB who sweats normally and although I don’t ride him much, he and his pasture mate (also an OTTB) have daily “races” in the pasture. Nobody asks them to do this - it’s totally of their own choosing. I think they are crazy but hey what do I know?

Anyway, thank you for your thoughts and suggestions. I love my horses and would certainly never want to put them in harm’s way. This is my first summer in Florida after having relocated from New York last fall. I am still trying to figure out how to survive the intense heat and humidity. Ironically, my Hanoverian has lived in Florida for four years. I just acquired him in March. I love him and like I said, I would never do anything to endanger him. I have taken your advice and will stop trying to ride him until the heat and humidity go down. I hope you are right and that we only have another 3-4 weeks of this. Yuck!
 

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I too am a "transplant" from NYS,.. Long Island in my case.
My horses all been bought here and lived here their entire life to my knowledge...they sweat profusely is a understatement.
I love the weather, it took several years to acclimate but even those born here are complaining bitterly of the terrible heat/humidity this year felt.

Trail riders here ride in early morning, often on around 7AM, down and done in a hour or two.
Many also ride and go places where streams are used for crossing and cooling the animals, if you know where to go swim the horses that is done too, just need to know activity level of alligators and snakes as some places are more dangerous than others...
Shaded trails used, seldom are they open fields.
I don't hear of much more than a walk being done and most seasoned riders quit riding at this time of the year for fear of heat exhaustion or stroke to horse or themselves.

I know when weather was like this on LI, racing at Belmont or Aqueduct was cancelled when it was dangerous numbers. Cancelled race cards full or partially run days events were more common than many realized and trainers would scratch their animals when weather had approached dangerous and if they did run a vet was standing waiting to jug the horse with IV and give drugs ASAP leaving the track to the test barn and cooling soaks took place immediately and still they lost some to overheating.

Horse shows here this time of the year are nuts, period.
Out there dressed even in short sleeves with a helmet on your head baking in the sun, no-way is that something I would do...can only imagine the riders sick from overheating and horses having health issues needing IV help is just not worth it to me.
There is a reason the true series top-rated shows are fall and winter series...the best of the best, cream-of-the-crop animals are in other parts of the nation now competing instead.

Do take care, enjoy your horse but make it a short easy ride of go for a walk for a few minutes for the horse-fix needed, but real schooling...not to me needing done.
Ride as early as possible, I use to ride when barely light so the cool damp ground helped keep us cooler and we weren't riding long...
Riding in evening to me when this hot is ridiculous when the ground baked in the sun all day only thing missing is the sunlight, the heat is still present though. :|

Enjoy, think cooling thoughts and soon we shall see a downward trend a degree or two a day start to take shape...once we get past rainy season it gets better...
:runninghorse2:...
 

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I hope we don’t see the same downward trend some parts of Colorado are going to see:

90+ degrees today, 40+ degrees for a high by Tuesday if I’m to believe the weather Channel. Holy Crow —————-
 
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I live in Florida as well. Yes, there are some riders who go through the whole summer. They will ride early in the morning and nothing to strenuous either. I don't. I work most days and not so willing to get out there so early on my days off to do anything. My horses are happy to be relaxing in the morning as well so they can cope with the afternoon heat. They have shade and a pond to splash in when it's as hot as it has been in the last few weeks. Also, they get salt in their supplement mixture that I make for them to compensate for lost minerals that they sweat out. My horses don't have the luxury of standing in a barn and having fans blowing on them unfortunately. They do get a breeze but this heat is hard on them.

I am very much looking forward to the humidity dial notching down a bit. I seriously need to get back into the woods with my horses to relax my own mind. But, for now, it's just too hot.
 

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Hope everyone else in this general area experienced the drop in humidity and a refreshing break from the extremes. It has made the day so much more pleasant.
 
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