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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a rescue gelding who's feet have been allowed to go uncared for for months. The horses has been walking poorly since i got him, limping on the front left and tiptoeing around. so i called out a barefoot farrier. He took a lot of heel off the left which was practically club footed, and he corrected the extended heel on my gelding flat right foot. Now the gelding has heels that are almost nonexistent. Quill, the gelding, also came to me with a terrible case of thrush which had eaten away most of his frogs. his frogs and heels are very sensitive and he flinches when I clean them out. now though, since Quills barefoot trim, the near absence of his heels has made it so that the poor horse is walking on his sensitive heel bulbs. Quill has been limping badly for days and he only seems to be getting worse.

in the long run i'd like Quill to develop healthy barefoot hooves, but at the moment i need to relieve the pain of his feet and get him walking soundly again.
Being Xmas break, this is my best chance to work with Quill and I am hoping to find a temporary option that will make him sound enough to start training (being a rescue he is untrained). Shoes are an option. they would lift his feet off the ground and relieve pain almost instantly as Quill's heel bulbs would no longer be hitting the ground when he walks. I'm wondering what the most temporary and best type of shoe would be for quill, both in relieving pain and a healthy recovery.
Boots could be another option, but i have no idea what type of boots would keep presure off of quill's heel. most boots just protect the feet, and Quill needs more than that.

Taking more off of the hoof at the moment is out of the question as my Farrier has already done too much.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

What does the vet have to say about the horse?

I would not be thinking about training until the poor guy is pain free.
 
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welcome to the forum :)
Best bet is post pictures of the feet, so the hoof people here can help you.
I would also not even think about working him until this problem is solved( shoes might or might not help), because, due to the club foot taken down, you could end up with massive tendon problems down the line.
Take care of the thrush first, keep him on ground where he's most comfortable .
 

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I did this to my horse about 5 years ago. Another forum kept telling me to bring the heels back to the widest part of the frog and it ended up with heels that were too low. My horse was on thick sand and still didn't walk much for a week.

It sounds like yours , as well, are trimmed too low.

I also had a terrible eaten up frog and took one hoof down to very low heel. It was to get the frog some stimulation. Maybe I should have left more heel, but in a few weeks it will be fine.

Try hand walking her on all different surfaces for 7-10 days and see if it works out. You can't put back on what's taken off. Durasole is supposed to harden a hoof up. Next visit tell the trimmer to leave some heel because your horse was sore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can't figure out how to post pictures, but i have a video of Quill walking before and after his trim as well as a picture of the original feet
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have all of Quill's information here: Quill's 30 Days the most recent post has the picture of his feet and videos of him walking.

I don't want to ask Quill to do anything while he is in pain, and i of course would not start working him until he is sound. What is important right now is to relieve the pain in his feet as soon as possible. I don't want to wait a few months for his feet to grow out simply in the name of barefoot. With how badly Quill was limping this morning I want to do what ever is possible to relieve him without causing damage now or in the long term. Whether that is boots or shoes, so be it, I just need guidance in this area in which i am not familiar.
 

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Bute would help the pain. Make the guy more comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's true, but it's not a long term solution. I'm trying to find a farriers opinion but corrective shoe-ers are hard to find in my area. I would love if there were slip on boots for horses with bad heels, but i can't find anything online
 

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You need the Easyboot Rx. You should be able to find them in B-CS somewhere. If not South Texas Tack on 290 close to Brenham may have them.

I have a farrier in Brenham who may be able to help you, if you want.

Are you treating his thrush? That is probably making him sore.

Nancy
 

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First off, you need a set of xrays. No point in guessing around what the problem is. It could be some sort of navicular problem, I don't know. Get the vet involved, this will help the farrier, too.
 

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Yep, vet & rads a good move. Ensure vet marks the hooves for xrays; dorsal wall, hairline & tip of frog at least. Photos of his hooves(& body) for critique can be attached to your post here if you go into 'advanced' reply, scroll down past message block to find 'attach' files. Check out the link in my signature below for what is required of pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Quill had all of that vet work done a few months before coming to me when his rescue analyzed him for his potential as a ridding horse. His bones were sound and the vets cleared him for unrestricted training and ridding.

Since then his time at pasture has resulted in his hooves growing incorrectly due to lack of trimming. Quill has an almost healed scar on his flank. a friend pointed out that this could have been an injury that caused quill to walk with more weight on his right side and resulted in the different shaped hooves on his front feet.

I looked into the RX boot, and it seems like it might work. I'm still hesitant though. the boot may support the whole hoof, but Quill's lameness seems more and more to be heel related. I'm going to call the easy boot company on Monday.
 

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You need to heal the thrush. Nothing is going to help till those infected frogs heal up
 

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If they (the frogs) are that sore, Soak them in hot as the horse will stand epsom salts and gently scrub them clean with some dish soapy water. I put dawn dish soap and water in a spray bottle. No need to rinse the soapy water off, but do blast away all the crud from every nook and cranny. Explore carefully. The horse may jerk its foot at sore spots. You can make them bleed also if its that bad so be careful but thorough. The horse may object to the soaking at first but it will help draw out the soreness and kill the infection. Every crack should be cleaned out well as you can. Look for the deep sulcus thrush also which will need packing so it will heal.

Then after soaking, dry and wrap the whole foot with the frog slathered in ichthammol ointment for 24 hours. if there is deep sulcus thrush you can pack the fissure with the ichthammol and a cotton ball behind it to hold it in. I use my hoof pick to poke them in gently. That will help the soreness tremendously.

Then, allow the frogs to dry out and harden in a dry clean stall with kiln dried shavings for 24 hours. Simple cleaning will get rid of most infection and not harm or kill new tissue growth.

Clean the foot thereafter 3 times a week, or more, as needed (pick out daily however) with dawn dishsoap and water. Scrub it clean anytime it is dirty with poo or poopy mud. Poop is the enemy. Keep it dry dry dry as you can.

Also you can use the dry powdered thrush treatment No Thrush daily. Good stuff. Especially important if you do the RXs. rubber boots hold foot moisture and can exacerbate thrush if not kept on top of...not to mention they keep the foot soft and sore. Dry, hard frogs are your goal as well as growing out the rag tags and building thicker frogs.

If the frog as a butt crack up the back of it, It has deep sulcus thrush. Youll want to carefully clean out the (likely) very sore crack and pack medication in there with a cotton ball behind it to hold it in every day til it closes in. Treat it as a wound. Clean and dry.

Most important. Dont use any harsh thrush treatments on sore thrush. Treat it as a wound till it is no longer sore and is closed in.
 

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First I have to say shame shame on any rescue that would adopt out a lame horse. A horse that lame should have been examined by a lameness vet AGAIN to determine exactly what is wrong before ever adopting him out.

That said now that you have him anyway, unless you get a vet to examine him you may not know if whatever is ailing him is actually curable. There are a multitude of serious hoof issues INSIDE the feet which can make a horse permanently lame, which can not be diagnosed without Xrays or other tests, and you need to rule them out before you get any more attached to or invested in this horse. .

I can't stand when some barefoot trimmer (trimmers are NOT 'farriers' by the way) say they can fix anything, when they do not have X-Ray vision.
Thrush, although nasty, rarely makes a horse that lame. (or lame at all) . A hoof ABSCESS could though.

This horse was SO lame in the first video that if it is not from an abscess, he could be dealing with a fractured bone inside the foot, or advanced navicular bone disease, or a torn foot ligament somewhere deep inside. Who knows what and you have been duped by a trimmer who doesn't now nearly enough about lameness.

Close up hoof pictures taken from level at the sides and of the soles may help evaluate the trim but in this case getting the vet and some X-rays would be better.
 

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To be honest, a few months without a trim did not ruin Quill. Many horses go years without hoofcare, and there is even a new movement to NOT trim them at all. I know, we have gone from one extreme to the next!!

Nancy
 

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So I called out a barefoot farrier. He took a lot of heel off the left which was practically club footed,
If it IS a real club foot and someone whacked off all the heel to try and make it look like the other foot, it is a good way to bow a tendon and permanently ruin the horse. You can NOT just take the trimming tools and try to make a foot look like something it is not, without regard for whatever is going on in the whole leg above it. Club feet have taller heels for a reason.
 

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^& even if there is no so called 'true' club issue going on, even if it is purely high heels due to long term bad farriery, founder, whatever, it's still generally a mistake to whack....(no, that term has different slang meaning here:|:oops:) ...remove too much heel in one fell swoop.
 

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There is not neceserially something wrong with bringing the heels down. Though it should've been done slowly and not too much in one go which is what I think happened with your horse. As mentioned above, probably if the trush is over, your horse will be a lot more comfortable.
 
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