The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Firstly, my friend brought this question to my attention. Her horse became lame again and has been on bute for quite some time now. She read online that bute for too long will cause liver damage, so she wants to know what a good substitue is. I would also like to know... and preferablly something natural?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
MSM is a good anti-inflammatoury as well as inexpensive enough and fairly benign to the overall system. You can also look into B-L Solution (also comes in pellet form). This is a yucca/devil's claw and ??? complound that seems to work very well for some, not so well for others. If overused, B-L can cause stomach upset but this is in relation to the amount given per dose, not so much the duration of use. Extended use of anything should be monitoured closely.

What is it specifically that you are treating? More often that not you can't go wrong with 20 minutes of cold hosing : ), tho this will comfort for only short periods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,635 Posts
I, personally, am not a fan of buting up horses in the first place. It's like people who are constantly taking a Tylenol every time they get a headache, and eventually, they build an immunity and have to take more and more and just end up over-medicated. Unless this horse REALLY REALLY REALLY needs a pain medicine, I would let him "walk it off" with some cold hosing and sometimes massaging helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
Continued dosing with Bute actually increases the risk of gastric upset including gastric ulcers.

What else your friend should use or do depends on the exact cause of lameness. If it's a soft tissue injury then "walking it off" is not the way to go. If it's arthritis then you do want more light daily exercise. Glucosamine and chondroitin can be used to help with joint pain. Adequan IM may be helpful in dealing with joint pain. Bute doesn't have to be given twice daily or even daily to provide pain relief. You can dose it every other day and thus decrease the risk of adverse events associated with Bute use while still getting the anti-inflammatory benefit. But really if this has been and on-going lameness and she hasn't consulted her vet, that is where she should start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
Just want to add to Ryle's post (all of which I agree with) in reference to "walking it off"... Inflammation can also cause permenant damage as in the case of laminitis or even less serious situations. While I do agree that it is not always best to reach for a drug when there is lameness or inflammation, there are many times when controlling swelling is as important as the pain relief gained from using drugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
ETA: on the "all natural" bit- I can see why people think that something being natural makes it somehow less toxic to animals and safer to use, but this is a very dangerous misconception. Foxglove, bella-donna, yellow star thistle, arsenic, oleander, all 100% natural and all very toxic. I bring these up specifically because the plants are often grown as ornamentals and/or found in pasture and arsenic can be in high levels in well water. Most of us know that they are dangerous and would never give them to our animals but many people will reach for an herbal remedy which is touted as "all natural". Personally, I prefer to use something that has been extensively studied with safe doses and duration of use guidelines set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,220 Posts
I highly recommend B-L Solution! It is a herbal way of going, but is just as powerful as bute, without the negative side effects that bute can give.

Search for it online, you'll get a great explanation on the product. I keep it in my 1st aid kit for when Nelson needs it. I give him a scoop of pellets after a hard ride, competition, if he seems off, swelling - etc, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,227 Posts
ETA: on the "all natural" bit- I can see why people think that something being natural makes it somehow less toxic to animals and safer to use, but this is a very dangerous misconception. Foxglove, bella-donna, yellow star thistle, arsenic, oleander, all 100% natural and all very toxic. I bring these up specifically because the plants are often grown as ornamentals and/or found in pasture and arsenic can be in high levels in well water. Most of us know that they are dangerous and would never give them to our animals but many people will reach for an herbal remedy which is touted as "all natural". Personally, I prefer to use something that has been extensively studied with safe doses and duration of use guidelines set.
very true but this does not mean that all natural remedies are bad. take the bio-bute for example. this is now being recommended by vets as an all round alternative to bute. ideally, if a natural remedy is being sought, research should be done to rule out anything else more harmful. personally, if a product is safe i would much rather use a natural remedy than pump my horse full of chemical drugs. not being argumentative just offering the other side of the opinion :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,184 Posts
First of all, I think having a vet out would be in your friend's best interest (or her horse's).
Second of all, Aspirin is a great substitute to Bute. You can get horse sized pills and then you take the dosage, mix it with boiling water and syringe it into their mouths like Bute. Banamine is another option, but it is more expensive and you'll probably end up giving it orally. There are many other Bute alternatives as well, just Google "equine anti-inflammatory".
Depending on the vets diagnosis, there are many other ways to treat inflammation on a long term basis that are healthier for the horse's digestive system. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
Again, the problem with these "all natural" supplements that are being touted for anti-inflammatory action is that they are classified as supplements BECAUSE they haven't been studied to prove safety, efficacy or appropriate dosing. So don't just assuming that because it's marketed means that it's safe. There have been lots of issues with products marketed as herbal supplements that have proven dangerous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,540 Posts
^^^ Exactly. Yucca has been shown to be poisonous to horses (at least in some studies). The studies on Devil's Claw have shown both sides, sometimes it seems to work othertimes it does nothing. Most supplements have had very little testing in horses or none at all. All natural can be really great or it can be just as destructive to your horses health as any lab made chemical supplement.

Bottom line - DO YOUR RESEARCH. Talk to your vet, university, feeds stores, and supplement people. If they don't have a real answer they can probably get you to people who do. Or they can find the answer in one of the medical journals that they have access too. And keep in mind that a feed company/store and supplement company are trying to sell you stuff. Sure they don't want to poison your horse, but they still want to get their products out the door.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top