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I have a 16 yr old QH that is slightly favoring his front left leg.
If you watch him out in the pasture you can BARELY tell as he walks around. In fact a "normal" person wouldn't notice it. If he trots and gallops it's more noticable. But I wouldn't call it a limp.
Anyway, I take him on short( 1 hr ) trail rides every other day or so and he loves going out. He rides the best on dirt/grass but you can tell it's uncomfortable for him to walk on gravel. He's a very healthy horse but I'm wondering what would cause him to favor his front hoof? He is current on farrier work.
I should note that his front feet point in a little bit. That's how I bought him.

Do you think that if I give him a little bit of Bute, before I ride him, would be good? Or is their a joint supplement that would help him?


Thanks :wink:
 

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He may have arthritis. There is a bute free pain medication that you can give daily. I have used it in the past but did not have any success, others swear by it. They also make aspirin for horses I have used that as well and it seemed to work well, but I think the aspirin is hard on their stomach.

I too have an older gelding with bad arthritis, he is mostly retired but when we ride him the vet told me to give him bute an hour before we ride to keep him comfortable. I feed it with alfalfa cubes to help buffer it. I don't like using bute as it is very hard on their stomach and frequent use can cause ulcers.

There are different opinions and reviews on joint supplements some swear by others not so much. If he has early arthritis then a joint supplement may help slow down the damage and help keep him comfortable but your not going to stop it.
 

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Covering it up with Bute and riding him anyway is not a good plan. I think you should figure out why he is lame. Get your farrier to first check him out and use hoof testers on him. Have him watch him carefully to see if he is babying his toe or his heels.

If he cannot figure out why he is sore, have a Vet look him over. Until them, stay off of him.

He can be developing a ring-bone. If it turns out to be heel pain (like Navicular syndrome), trim or shoe accordingly. If it turns out to be sole tenderness or toe pain, again, shoe accordingly. If you have a farrier that soles him out when he trims him, get a new farrier.

If it turns out to be something chronic like arthritis, then think about using an anti-inflammatory or put him on a drug like Adequan or Legend.

Figure it all out FIRST!
 

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Do I ever AGREE with Cherie....

Your horse by his actions is telling you the only way he can he hurts, something hurts and is bothering him.

Why would you ignore that and cause him more discomfort and pain, possibly injuring him or compounding a problem by masking it with bute?

Find out what ails the horse, fix the issue and address the long-term effects of what that ailment is now while you can.
Ignoring a problem or band-aiding it could jeopardize the health and soundness of your horse and that can also jeopardize your safety riding and handling him...

Find out the problem, till then stay off of him.
 

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Absolutely agree with the two above posters.

Find out what's making him sore, fix (not mask) the problem, then continue riding. ^^
 

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I agree about not covering it up with bute, but I wouldn't have a problem giving it a day or two as a diagnostic tool. Bute is more effective for some conditions than others, and knowing if bute helps or not could be good info for your vet/farrier.
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I can only agree with the others - by masking the pain and working him you could be making a not so serious thing into a bad one
Get him checked out - if it is arthritis then light work will be good for him - but you need to discuss a pain med or treatment for him that's not going to have side effects when used long term
 

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There was a girl whose horse was "arthritic" and she busted her daily and rode her. She was riding the mare into the ground (not saying OP is) and nearly ruined the horse. I would not bute and ride EVER. If the animal is in too might pain to be sound without, riding won't help the issue. UNLESS its arthritis but i would need the vets opinion on that.
 

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very interesting replys... I'm gonna see if my vet can come out today or tomorrow and check him out. Will let you know what I find out :)
Good for you.

It is always better to find out WHY your horse is lame, than just drugging him up with bute.

And yes, when a horse favors a front leg it means he is lame. No if's, and's, or but's about it.
 
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