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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a horse who was born april 2012
Can i lunge him but not running just walking?
Also can i put a saddle on his back at 3years old?
 

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Yes, I was teaching my baby to lunge before she left her mother's side. Just don't run her around a bunch. Keep sessions short because your baby will get bored very quickly. You should be doing groundwork as the baby is growing up, don't wait until you want to back it to start and your life will be easier in most cases.

A lot of people are riding their horses by 2 (not that I recommend that), so yes, putting a saddle on their back at 3 years old should not hurt them in any way.
 

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Do you have a trainer you are working with?

I'm doubting your experience level when you ask if it's okay if you put the saddle on his back. Have you done this before and do you know how?

If you don't know what you are doing, it's a great way to get into a wreck by saddling a young horse for the first time.

Just looking out for your safety.
 
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How long have you had this horse? From this post and another I saw from you, you seem incredibly inexperienced. Why do you have a young horse?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
And i have a young horse because i wanted to get a good connection with him, and i want a horse that will live a while some wanted him young plus i wanted to train him myself
 

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Tara that's ridiculous. Get some lessons. Green plus green equals black and blue. That 'bond' doesn't come from raising one it comes from having it trust you which will not come if your inexperienced. This is an accident waiting to happen.
 

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Taralynn, I can appreciate that you want to bond with him, but you won't do that by training him yourself. Actually, trying to train a horse by yourself when you really don't know what you're doing is a great way to destroy a bond and create trust issues in addition to all the behavioral issues.

If you want to learn how to properly train a horse, then you should really work with a trainer so that they can help you learn to handle any unforeseen behaviors correctly....instead of you trying to get them corrected after you get hurt.

Training a young horse isn't for the inexperienced because you just don't have the knowledge to know when to push and when to back off, you don't know when the horse is ready for something and when they're not. If you push a young horse just a little bit too far, they can blow up and injure themselves, you, and anyone else around.

Please, for your own safety and for the sake of the horse's training, please get some help from a good trainer. You'll be a better owner/rider/handler and you'll have a better horse for it....without the broken trust and broken bones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Taralynn, I can appreciate that you want to bond with him, but you won't do that by training him yourself. Actually, trying to train a horse by yourself when you really don't know what you're doing is a great way to destroy a bond and create trust issues in addition to all the behavioral issues.

If you want to learn how to properly train a horse, then you should really work with a trainer so that they can help you learn to handle any unforeseen behaviors correctly....instead of you trying to get them corrected after you get hurt.

Training a young horse isn't for the inexperienced because you just don't have the knowledge to know when to push and when to back off, you don't know when the horse is ready for something and when they're not. If you push a young horse just a little bit too far, they can blow up and injure themselves, you, and anyone else around.

Please, for your own safety and for the sake of the horse's training, please get some help from a good trainer. You'll be a better owner/rider/handler and you'll have a better horse for it....without the broken trust and broken bones.
I completely understand, and i do know a lot about horses, lots family have horses that i have worked with and ridden.. And i will be having help with training, my family knows a lot about training them, but thank you though :)
 

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When you lunge the colt, it's really about you, the more dominant one, asking him to move his feet and stopping and enjoying a rest. Learn to send him in both directions. If you back up a few steps it encourages him to turn toward you. Try to keep him relaxed as they learn better than when all hyped up. Remember, you speak a different language from your colt and you need to help him understand what you want thro your body language. Don't get upset if he doesn't seem to respond to what you think you are asking. Try something else. And smile. You can start placing a light saddle on him altho a bareback pad might be better for now to get him used to the feeling of a cinch, which is done up barely snug and not saddle tight.
 

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Well, this is my first horse, and i just needed some information :)

And i have a young horse because i wanted to get a good connection with him, and i want a horse that will live a while some wanted him young plus i wanted to train him myself
Taralynn, this is rookie mistake #1. It is NEVER a good idea for an inexperienced (green) rider to work with an inexperienced (green) horse. Neither of you know what you are doing, and one or both of you will get hurt as a result. This is where the old saying "green + green = black & blue" comes from.

Horses don't have "good connections". They don't think about you during the day. They don't think about your feelings. They don't sit around wondering when you are going to show up. They are a horse. Period. They will choose their horse buddies over you. They will choose grass and treats over you. They only learn to respect and trust you when you are a solid leader.

I highly advise you to take riding lessons on an older horse who has been there and done that. Because if you don't even know how to handle a trained horse, how are you going to handle an untrained one?

A 2-yr-old should NOT be your first horse.

Do you think it would be wise for a 9-yr-old child to drive a car? No! So why would it make sense for an inexperienced rider to "drive" a horse? Especially when the horse doesn't have automatic shifting, or brakes, or a steering wheel because they are not trained.

and i do know a lot about horses
No you don't.

And I don't mean that to be snotty or rude, but to make you actually accept and understand that you should not work with this horse at all unless you have supervision by someone who has successfully trained young horses before. So that you can learn the correct way to do it. Why make your own mistakes and ruin the horse, when you can work with someone who's been there and done that?
 

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'Advice from people' will NEVER take the place of learning in a correct environment on a good well broke horse. You need to learn feel. Feel can only come from years of working with horses.
 
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