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I have a 12 year old unregistered quarter horse mare who I'd love to breed just once. She was a rescue and is my heart horse and I would love to get a foal from her to also keep forever, provided the vet says she is breeding sound and healthy. I have other reasons to breed her other than me loving her, she has good bones and feet, a great temperament, smart and willing and to top it off a beautiful color! I am considering breeding her to a local Hanoverian stallion as I love that warm blood breed but am also looking at other breed options in my area, most of which are registered. My question is, would I be able to register the foal with the chosen stallions registry?
Ignore her lack of muscle, I didn't do anything with her over the winter except try to fatten her up :)
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Welcome to the Forum!!

I won't comment on registering a half-grade baby to a specific registry as I don't know there policies on such...

What I wanted to comment on is you mention the mare is a rescue...
If she came from a organized rescue there are rules about breeding...most forbid breeding and bringing another to the world.
If the horse was a private rescue,...then the decision is yours to make.
Do include your vet in your decision as mare care is a must for best outcome and since you say "rescue" that the mare is recovered enough herself to be able to develop a in-utero baby and remain healthy.
馃惔... jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to the Forum!!

I won't comment on registering a half-grade baby to a specific registry as I don't know there policies on such...

What I wanted to comment on is you mention the mare is a rescue...
If she came from a organized rescue there are rules about breeding...most forbid breeding and bringing another to the world.
If the horse was a private rescue,...then the decision is yours to make.
Do include your vet in your decision as mare care is a must for best outcome and since you say "rescue" that the mare is recovered enough herself to be able to develop a in-utero baby and remain healthy.
馃惔... jmo...
I will defiantly include my vet in this decision. I want her to be healthy before I do anything. And when I say rescue I mean she was saved from a kill pen by a local lady and she sold her to me. When she was saved she had a 4-5 month old colt at her side already so we think she foaled early 2020 (I bought her Sept. 2020) so I know she has at least safely foaled before and would work closely with my vet to make sure it is safe for her to foal just once more. Since I bought her I have been working on getting her to a healthy weight again, she was a bag of bones when they saved her and she has come a long way. The foal being registered isn't much of a big deal to me because I would do my best to keep mom and baby for the rest of their lives but this was more just a curiosity post.
 

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I don't know anything about the Hanoverian registry but I wanted to comment on the comments about cross breeding. You actually have less of an issue with genetic diseases when you DO crossbreed. The reason we have so many genetic problems in some breeds today (like QH's) is because people are into "purebreds" and like to inbreed them all with each other. I am not a expert but would venture to guess you actually have better odds of a healthy foal cross breeding than breeding purebreds. That's why we have to test all these purebreds, so we don't combine the faulty genes back together and get genetically defective foal.

To ME, my biggest reason not to breed would be that I didn't want to risk my mare's life. But breeding a single crossbred foal that will probably not go on to be bred itself (because everyone is obsessed with purebreds).......I really see no harm in crossbreeding. The foal should be gentically healthy, and if it DID get a genetic defect from sire or dam, it is likely only one copy of the defective gene, not two, like with purebred horses.

PS. I really like your mare's build. Short, strong back, good bones and feet. Much better than a lot of "Quarter Horses" I see which lack in the bone and foot department.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a 12 year old unregistered quarter horse mare who I'd love to breed just once. She was a rescue and is my heart horse and I would love to get a foal from her to also keep forever, provided the vet says she is breeding sound and healthy. I have other reasons to breed her other than me loving her, she has good bones and feet, a great temperament, smart and willing and to top it off a beautiful color! I am considering breeding her to a local Hanoverian stallion as I love that warm blood breed but am also looking at other breed options in my area, most of which are registered. My question is, would I be able to register the foal with the chosen stallions registry?
Ignore her lack of muscle, I didn't do anything with her over the winter except try to fatten her up :)
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I have edited the post a bit to clear some things up. This is not a decision I would take lightly. I am not new to the horse world and know the risks of breeding. I would work closely with my vet to make sure she is sound and healthy and ok to breed. She is already getting a health check and blood test next week, not for breeding purposes, just for health purposes. In response to the person with the long post that was a bit on the rude side, I will only respond to the grade vs. unregistered, where I am from grade can mean both.
 

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Warmblood registries typically register the foals with the dam's registry. So an Oldenburg mare could have a foal by a Hanoverian (that's also approved Oldenburg) and the resulting foal would be entered into the Oldenburg registry. Easy peasy.

With your mare being a grade/unknown parentage, you could try for certificate of pedigree Certificate of Pedigree Request 鈥 The American Hanoverian Society You won't be able to do much with the foal in regards to this association, but it looks like you could show and possibly earn points later on.

Or you may look into the Dutch registry Foal Registration - KWPN-NA

You may have restrictions that approved horses don't have, but at least your foal with have a paper trail. And with KWPN you may even get a microchip, but I'm not totally sure...

The whole premise of the warmblood registries was to improve native stock with approved stallions, so I don't think you are completely out of your tree at all. A private owner may scoff at your mare (or not) but you can always breed with frozen semen if the inclination struck.

As to the concern for genetic diseases, well, with the miracle of modern science, you can get testing done to help reduce the risks of an unhealthy foal! The biggest one that most Warmblood registries are testing for now is Warmblood Fragile Foal Syndrome (WFFS).

Whatever you decide, good luck!
 

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Are you just trying to find every way to be rude? Number 1, I only said I was CONSIDERING breeding her. I haven't made a decision yet nor bred her in the first place. It was not my doing that she ended up in the kill pen. I will do everything I can to keep this mare for the rest of her life to ensure that doesn't happen again and the same will go for her foal IF I breed. Again all this will be based on what the vet says anyway. So if you would kindly please keep the rest of your comments to yourself. Thank you.
I just want to comment that I appreciate that you are doing your research. So many people breed their horses because, well, why not? And the horses pay the ultimate price.
 
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This post has been reviewed and edited by the Horseforum Moderation Team. Some content was removed. We thank you for your patience. Carry on.
 

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What do you want the potential foal for, beyond just having it? What discipline? Competitive or just a trail horse?

Very few registries, to my knowledge, register half-grade horses. One registry that I know for sure does is AHA (Arabian horse association). I think you could register a colored foal with PtHA (Pinto horse association).

I have my doubts that a warmblood stallion owner would allow a grade horse to be bred to their stallion. Good breeders have preference towards registered, proven, complimentary mares. As example, a 4 yr old TB stallion (in training now, working on being proven competitively) that I love and want to one day breed a mare to specifically has this listed on his stud profile: "Special consideration given to mares with exceptional pedigrees or excellent performance records". Why would the stallion owner want mediocre mares bred to their stallion, when there is a market for nice broodmares to be bred to their stallion and produce amazing babies?

This is NOT saying your horse is mediocre, but in the sense of breeding, a grade horse doesn't carry the same weight that a registered, proven mare does, IMO.

I would encourage you to study her conformation and determine what strengths and weaknesses she brings to the table (along with genetic testing for common genetic issues she could pass down onto a foal). Only then would I consider breeding her. Then you start searching the market for a stallion that will compliment her, and hopefully strengthen her weaknesses.
 

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My questions go along with @ClearDonkey's.

What do you want a second horse for? If you are interested in jumping or dressage, then a Hanoverian would make sense. It would not make as much sense if you want a trail horse. If so, do you see yourself going down the trail on a potentially big, 16 hand horse that is young and energetic? Do you imagine riding a large and bouncy trot and lofty canter out there, and dealing with that energy level? I'd consider if you are looking for a trail horse, that bigger horses can be difficult to get on and off out on the trails, and going through and under narrow trees can be tricky too.

Along with that, before breeding you should think about your facility and if you have the appropriate fencing for a foal, and the ability to separate the mare and foal for weaning.
 

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Call the AQHA and get it straight from them. They are very helpful and will gladly take your money to register the mare if there is a way she meets the criteria.

There are DNA tests that cost about $110 where they mail you an envelope and you place some mane hair on the glue. Then you mail it off, last time I did this it went to UC Davis.

IF the mare鈥檚 parents were registered with the AQHA, congrats. You can then pay a fee for an aged horse to register her. I don鈥檛 know if there is a cutoff age. Last time I checked the price did go up with years though.

If not, you have a grade horse and any foal by her will also be grade as far as Quarter Horses are concerned.

Just my opinion as a buyer but I would not mind a Gelding being grade. Mares are a likely not, Stallions are a no way.

Know what being registered means. Again, in my opinion. A registered horse has a higher resale value, eligible for any show that requires it (many do), and gives people an idea what a horse was bred for.

Unless you are going to get super competitive I don鈥檛 think it matters as much as what people make it out to be. Yes breeding is a big deal, at the top level. At the top level it is all about breeding. So know where you want to be, what you do with horses and specifically what you will do with a foal. Good luck
 

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The photograph isn't great for a conformation critique but based on what's there, she looks like a really nice little mare.
Top that with the fact that she's sound, healthy and has a nice willing temperament and you have something worth more than a name on a registry.

I'm not going to lecture you on risks because you seem to be well aware that they exist.

Since you're looking at Hanoverians specifically, then I'm going to assume that you're wanting to breed a competition horse?

If you want to breed a horse for a specific discipline then look for a stallion that's got some proven record of producing offspring that excel in that discipline.

I personally don't have much interest in a horse being registered, I'm more interested in how it performs and its temperament and soundness.
Unless I was looking to show in some specific breed classes - like Arabians or in the UK where they have all of the native pony breed classes, the breed is irrelevant when set against suitability.

I personally prefer the Irish Draught Sport Horse stallions to the Warmbloods.

If you want a record in a registry you can always use the American Warmblood and Sport Horse
Eligibility 鈥 American Warmblood Society & Sporthorse Registry (awssr.org)
 

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She is certainly a very nice mare, congratulations on her! As with any breeding you have to look long term at what not only your goals and dreams are, but realistically what the downsides and risks are. With an unproven grade mare of unknown pedigree, your risks are somewhat different than with a registered mare with a performance record. Mainly about what would happen to the foal should you happen not be able to raise it, train it to usefulness, or just have to part with it.

Of course you think you'll keep the foal, but many many people have thought the same thing when they bred their mare, and life changed for them, and they had to let that dream go. It's good to have a practical plan B. The most probable answer to your original question is that your foal will not be as saleable as a foal out of two registered parents of the same breed. And that should figure into your decision.
 

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You might want to check which warmbloods sires owners will sell you semen. Many have to approve the mare first, most would not approve a grade mare I would imagine.
 
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Since it's been mentioned a couple of times--

If someone wishes to breed their mare using fresh, cooled semen, they would have to deal with a stallion owner/agent--which, yes, would have the right to approve what mares they would breed to.

However, if said person were to buy frozen semen (from Europe for example), you purchase from a broker--no approval from stallion owner needed. So, a grade mare could be bred to an approved warmblood stallion. It would cost more, typically there's no live foal guarantee, and some mares don't take with frozen--so it's a gamble--but doable if one's heart is set on a warmblood.
 
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