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Brewers. Yeast makes sense but I can’t attest to the success or failure of it for sweet itch. Hopefully someone who has used it for sweet itch will come in:)

The overall diet is critical. Absolutely no sweet feed and no molasses in the ingredients list, if possible.

10 CC’s of injectable cow vitamin A fed orally once a month during the height of midge fly season helps some horses.

After that the horse could be fed 3,000 - 5,000 IU of pure Vitamin E (no added selenium) to boost the immune system.

If the horse is fighting Neck Threadworms, aka, Onchocerca worms, administering a double dose of pure Ivermectin will help kill them:)
 
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Here is a good write up about sweet itch, what it is, what works, what doesn't work, and why.

It is an allergic reaction to midge bites, but it can trigger a cascade of other allergic reactions. Nutrition does not play a big role.
 

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It’s supposed to help suppress the overactive immune system response to the saliva the midges produce but I’ve never tried it. It’s also supposed to make the blood taste unpleasant to midges.
It isn’t going to hurt the horse but I would buy a product that’s been developed specifically for horses, try something like Bye Bye Itch

I’ve had best results simply by using a thick barrier cream that keeps the midge saliva away from the skin. Try Killitch
 
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