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Can you do Cutting without the "breeding"?

7215 Views 20 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  smrobs
I am really interested in the ranch horse classes, particularly cutting. I have a two year old app gelding that I am starting this summer (though very slowly I might add) and I think it might be fun for us to try him on cows this fall/winter and see if he takes to it.

He isn't cutting bred, more pleasure/all around/halter bred. (Here is a link to his pedigree - Mj The Right Secret Appaloosa )

Has anyone had success with horses doing cutting that aren't necessarily bred for it? Would love input and stories, I'm really hoping we can make things work.

Here are some pics of my boy!

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I would say yes and no. If he has the right mind, if he's alittle cowy and the right training is provided then sure. Any horse can go into just about any discipline with the right training and mind. My 16 hand speed bred gelding was trained to cut when the previous owners were trying to find out what he was good at. Obviously he wasn't the best.

That's where the big BUT kinda comes in. It's doubtful he'll be comparable to the expensive expensive horses competing at the top NCHA level. The ones that were bred to do just that, and excel at it. And if your fine with that then it doesn't matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just want to do low level shows, MnRHA shows. :) They seem very laid back and have a friendly atmosphere. I just want to ride and have a little fun, definitely not nationals level.
 

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The bottom picture scares me with that horse's head cranked in so tight. I've known of horses to break the lower jaw when trussed up like this. also your saddle is way too far forward and appears to be a poor fit.
 

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The bottom picture scares me with that horse's head cranked in so tight. I've known of horses to break the lower jaw when trussed up like this. also your saddle is way too far forward and appears to be a poor fit.
That is really common for pleasure horses. Heck, that's loose compared to a lot of horses I've seen being tied back.

OP, I don't see anything wrong with the photo you've posted. Yes the saddle is a little far forward but we all know it'll slide back and it probably is forward because the horse is tied back.
 

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That is really common for pleasure horses. Heck, that's loose compared to a lot of horses I've seen being tied back. .
We all know I'm not a pleasure fan but I've honestly never seen a head tied like this. It looks extremely uncomfortable for the horse. If I saw this in person I'd be asking what the heck? So OP (or Delete) please enlighten me to this purpose?

As for the original question? Go For It!! You'll never know unless you try :D he might not go pro but its a fun activity either way
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We all know I'm not a pleasure fan but I've honestly never seen a head tied like this. It looks extremely uncomfortable for the horse. If I saw this in person I'd be asking what the heck? So OP (or Delete) please enlighten me to this purpose?

As for the original question? Go For It!! You'll never know unless you try :D he might not go pro but its a fun activity either way
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Typically people tie horses back to teach them to give at the pole. Instead of them yanking against your hands, they can yank against themselves. I start all my horses off by tying them back, but not this tight.

The only thing I see wrong is how tight it is and especially that being a solid lead. OP, if you're going to tie your horse back that tight I would suggest using a bungee.
 

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Is it a temporary training aid? Or? I've taught my mare to bend and flex at the poll. She gives with pretty light pressure as well. We started on the ground with a halter and just transitioned up to the bridle and then from the saddle. I know tie downs can be useful for some horses I've just never used one so I'm not properly versed on how they work per say (I mean besides the fact it forces the head down, I'm referring to the more technical mechanics of its use). Hope that makes sense :D sorry for hijacking the thread OP, I'm an addict to learning
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Like for example I've been told barrel horses use them for support in getting around the tight turns but how is my question. Hopefully that example helps clarify my question a bit :D
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Is it a temporary training aid? Or? I've taught my mare to bend and flex at the poll. She gives with pretty light pressure as well. We started on the ground with a halter and just transitioned up to the bridle and then from the saddle. I know tie downs can be useful for some horses I've just never used one so I'm not properly versed on how they work per say (I mean besides the fact it forces the head down, I'm referring to the more technical mechanics of its use). Hope that makes sense :D sorry for hijacking the thread OP, I'm an addict to learning
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For me it is. An it all depends on how heavy in my hands the horse is. I'll put a week or two on them before I tie them back. I'll tie them back and lunge them around for a few days till I see them start to understand that the pressure = give your chin. I stop once they understand that and continue teaching from the saddle.

In other situations if I have an older horse who has been spoiled and knows better, I'll do this too. To remind them "Hey, you're supposed to do this". Or if I have a naughty one, I'll tie them back to get some extra sweating in there :lol:

Tightness always depends on the bit, the horse, and the situation. But I ALWAYS use bungees. I never use a solid line.

Many people see this as cheating. To me, it's something that I can quickly accomplish without getting my arms sore. If you have to ride 5+ horses a day, this helps a lot. But if you have the time to invest in teaching the horse to give it's chin, then by all means do it from the saddle. :D I am in the mentality "work smart, not hard".
 

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Like for example I've been told barrel horses use them for support in getting around the tight turns but how is my question. Hopefully that example helps clarify my question a bit :D
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Well example to counter that example :D

With my dangerous baby, he had never been taught to give his face. Once I got him going forward for a few days I would lunge him tied back before I got on. Instead of him fighting my hands, he was fighting himself. This process (with bungees) allows him to decide when he wants to give and when he does its instant release. The bungees always respond accordingly to the slightest give and don't make mistakes like my hands do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Uhhh...they are bungees. They are not tight, in fact my horse (if he wanted to) could stretch into the bit more if he wanted. He is in a rubber snaffle and those are rubber bungees, and I only have them this tight at the walk and trot. In fact, they aren't very tight at all. I have seen people do them WAY tighter in WAY harsher bits and with solid lines. I do not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Also for that picture I had JUST put the saddle on, and it was just to take a picture for a friend to see how I put the bungees on. After a few circles at the walk, we were finished.

I always start my saddle a little more forward, versus back. After a few circles (either bungeed or not) the saddle slips into the perfect place and the final tightening of the cinch is done.
 

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Also for that picture I had JUST put the saddle on, and it was just to take a picture for a friend to see how I put the bungees on. After a few circles at the walk, we were finished.

I always start my saddle a little more forward, versus back. After a few circles (either bungeed or not) the saddle slips into the perfect place and the final tightening of the cinch is done.
It looks like a solid lead line and as far as the saddle I don't think there is any wrong with it. I always set mine forward when I first saddle because I know it will slide back.

Thanks for clearing that up OP!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you delete. And yes, I suppose the rope halter lead rope is solid, but that has no connection to the bit or saddle, just straight from the halter to my hand. :)
 

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Thank you delete. And yes, I suppose the rope halter lead rope is solid, but that has no connection to the bit or saddle, just straight from the halter to my hand. :)
The grey bungee (I see it now) looks like a lead rope if you're not looking hard enough. Very misleading :lol:

Beautiful appy BTW. I generally don't like apps but I love the look of yours
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I can understand that, next time though I would appreciate an inquiry and wait for my answer than for people to immediately assume :?

And thank you very much! He was born looking completely different lol... I love him dearly and I can't wait for us to start competing under saddle next year. I can't wait to try him on cattle! Keeping my toes crossed we can make it work. :D
 
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