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Discussion Starter #1
Yes yes this is an actual breed of horse not just a figure of speech because of where we live in Canada.

Unfortunately the Canadian Horse continues to be in CRITICAL status because of low numbers and is still declining. This means there are fewer than 200 annual registrations in the United States and estimated global population less than 2,000 Canadian Horses.

https://livestockconservancy.org/index.php/heritage/internal/conservation-priority-list#Horses

WHEREAS the Canadian horse was introduced into Canada in 1665, when the King of France sent horses from his own stables to the people of his North American colony;
WHEREAS the Canadian horse increased in number during the ensuing century to become an invaluable ally to the settlers in their efforts to survive and prosper in their new home;
WHEREAS all Canadians who have known the Canadian horse have made clear their high esteem for the qualities of great strength and endurance, resilience, intelligence and good temper that distinguish the breed;
WHEREAS the Canadian horse was at one time in danger of being lost through interbreeding or as a casualty of war, but has survived these perils but barely;

WHEREAS, since 1885 and all during the present century, widespread and increasingly successful efforts have been made to re-establish and preserve the Canadian horse;
AND WHEREAS the Government of Canada wishes to recognize the unique place of the Canadian horse in the history of Canada;
Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons of Canada, enacts as follows:
Short Title
1 This Act may be cited as the National Horse of Canada Act.
The National Horse
2 The horse known as the Canadian horse is hereby recognized and declared to be the national horse of Canada.

Breed Characteristics
Height 14 - 16 hh, with a breed average of 15 hh
Weight: 1000 - 1400 lb
Sturdy build with strong legs, substantial bone, and excellent feet
Shorter in stature than many common riding horses in use today, a Canadian Horse tends to look bigger, be stronger, and are able to carry a larger/taller rider than their height would suggest due to their substantial body and bone size
Usually black but may also be bay, brown or chestnut. Rare individuals may be Palomino or Cream. Gray no longer exists in the breed (despite it being listed on the breed poster below)
Long, abundant, often wavy tail and mane
Excellent dispositions and good work ethic
Sociable, intelligent, sensible, trainable, and calm
The Canadian Horse is truly versatile and may be found doing dressage, jumping, eventing, endurance, driving, trail, ranch work or just being the family or kid's horse.



 

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nice horses - knew a few when I lived in Ontario, haven't seen any since I moved to manitoba though. Glad to see someone being their cheerleader.

I think it will be tough for any of the heritage type breeds to stay viable lately - all around horses just don't have a great market value right now and when it costs more to produce than a horse sells for it makes it hard for breeders to continue. I do believe there was a strong contingent of them at the cross nation WE cup this year - hopefully will give the breed some new fans.
 

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I think as long as they keep to that sturdy build and can handle humans of greater weights and do it with the flair and style that M2G's possess then this should encourage the preservation. I'd love to see them in person. My son drools over them and would love to have one show up some Christmas morn..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's awesome that they have you as an ambassador to this breed, M2G! Your mares are lovely, and a fantastic representation of the versatility of Canadian horses!
thank you, and that's our main goal to really show people what the breed can do and to educate.

all around horses just don't have a great market value right now and when it costs more to produce than a horse sells for it makes it hard for breeders to continue.
You making that statement actually shows me that you're not very educated on the breed itself. The opposite is actually the case. In fact some of the highest priced horses on the market right now are competing Canadian Horses because they are rare and are so successful. That is in part why it is so difficult for breeders to stay in business(many more reasons of course), is because they can be quite expensive (just like any other rare or less common horse breeders)horses to purchase in the first place, but they not only hold their value but they very very quickly increase their value with training. We have been offered the high 5 figures on our horses on many occasions because it is so easy to make a "good buck" on them if you're in for a quick turn around.

I think as long as they keep to that sturdy build and can handle humans of greater weights and do it with the flair and style that M2G's possess then this should encourage the preservation. I'd love to see them in person. My son drools over them and would love to have one show up some Christmas morn..
The blood lines of our horses are a Baroque type, but you can get more sports types that look like warmbloods. It all comes down to the type you are looking for:gallop:
 
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Fantastic pictures everyone! the equine affair always sounds so fantastic! It's the second time we have gotten an invite to help with the demos etc with the Canadians but it's such a distance away from us that we have not yet been able to pull off managing balancing the house, the animals and work and hauling all the horses down yet to do it.

I am constantly on the Canadian Horse Link drooling over horses. When we were up in Quebec last month I saw some guys mixed in with the Haflingers who I thought might be Cheval Canadiens:

View attachment 997503
That baby definitely looks Canadian at first glimpse! that horse in the background also looks like it might be a Canadian at first glimpse! good eye!
 

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I fell in love with the breed when I saw them being represented at Spruce Meadows many, many, many years ago.

I finally bought my own 4 years ago - I could only afford an unbroke 2 year old as the horses with training were WAY outside my budget.

With the help of my trainer, we have brought my horse along very slowly. She is 6 now and I still consider her green - but I have found that this breed takes a long time to mature. With that said, my mare was extremely easy to train and very easy to get along with. With our winters, it was nearly impossible to be consistent with her, but we did not have to take very many backwards steps at all.

I absolutely love the breed and wouldn't hesitate getting another one. The only downside is my mare is a fatty-fat and I have to constantly micro-manage her eating - especially in the summer months.
 

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The only downside is my mare is a fatty-fat and I have to constantly micro-manage her eating - especially in the summer months.
My first thought, looking at @my2gelding;s pictures, the Canadian Horse website and your pics, was these gorgeous horses are IR waiting to happen, if they aren't closely monitored.

If I were younger, I would still give serious consideration to one in the pacing side of the gene pool. Like you @cbar, I would have to buy green, and I might not be able to afford green either:smile:
 

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The only downside is my mare is a fatty-fat and I have to constantly micro-manage her eating - especially in the summer months.
My first thought, looking at @my2gelding;s pictures, the Canadian Horse website and your pics, was these gorgeous horses are IR waiting to happen, if they aren't closely monitored.

If I were younger, I would still give serious consideration to one in the pacing side of the gene pool. Like you @cbar, I would have to buy green, and I might not be able to afford green either:smile:
 
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I fell in love with the breed when I saw them being represented at Spruce Meadows many, many, many years ago.

I finally bought my own 4 years ago - I could only afford an unbroke 2 year old as the horses with training were WAY outside my budget.

With the help of my trainer, we have brought my horse along very slowly. She is 6 now and I still consider her green - but I have found that this breed takes a long time to mature. With that said, my mare was extremely easy to train and very easy to get along with. With our winters, it was nearly impossible to be consistent with her, but we did not have to take very many backwards steps at all.

I absolutely love the breed and wouldn't hesitate getting another one. The only downside is my mare is a fatty-fat and I have to constantly micro-manage her eating - especially in the summer months.
What a stunning horse! just so gorgeous. The breed is very easy to fall in love with isn't it. Just so versatile and so much fun to ride and do things with. Absolutely love them and so glad you've had the chance to experience it.

My first thought, looking at @my2gelding; was these gorgeous horses are IR waiting to happen, if they aren't closely monitored.
@cbar, I would have to buy green, and I might not be able to afford green either:smile:
That's a pretty blanket statement though. Anyone with a drafts, ponies, any hardy breed of horse or any horse owner that disregards their horse's health and throws them out to pasture and lets them on feed that is way to rich will end up with a horse that has negative health consequences.
 

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What a stunning horse! just so gorgeous. The breed is very easy to fall in love with isn't it. Just so versatile and so much fun to ride and do things with. Absolutely love them and so glad you've had the chance to experience it.

That's a pretty blanket statement though. Anyone with a drafts, ponies, any hardy breed of horse or any horse owner that disregards their horse's health and throws them out to pasture and lets them on feed that is way to rich will end up with a horse that has negative health consequences.
Yes but there are some of the more thrifty breeds that are on the infamous "Predisposed" list. Arabs and Walking Horses are at the top:).

I've had two metabolic TWH's that weren't thrown out to pasture. When the first in was diagnosed in 2007, I really clamped down on pasture time. It was a shocker when the second one was diagnosed IR and foundered in 2012. While limited pasture helps, it's more complex than that for some horses:)

My point that I did not make clear is these Canadian Horses also need watched:).
 

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Yes but there are some of the more thrifty breeds that are on the infamous "Predisposed" list. Arabs and Walking Horses are at the top:).

I've had two metabolic TWH's that weren't thrown out to pasture. When the first in was diagnosed in 2007, I really clamped down on pasture time. It was a shocker when the second one was diagnosed IR and foundered in 2012. While limited pasture helps, it's more complex than that for some horses:)

My point that I did not make clear is these Canadian Horses also need watched:).
Interesting! I did not know that Arabs and Walkers were on that list. Why do you think that is?
 

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Interesting! I did not know that Arabs and Walkers were on that list. Why do you think that is?
Arabs are desert bred, their Gene pool is used to existing on nothing.

TWH's by and large are very easy keepers. All of mine have been air ferns.

Their Foundation Mare Of Record is a Morgan -- they are also easy keepers.

You're dedicated to the good health and well being of your horses, you might be interested in this article I posted a few days back, if you haven't seen it:)

It talks about changes in what we should look for in hay analysis.

https://drkhorsesense.wordpress.com...SdzCV0KEhlIkt2JOYeEqnV5y_h0vEz1RBvbzIPAsShWuw

Here's a link from Tiple Crown with a paragraph that briefly mentions certain breeds having a better ability to store fat than other breeds. It is all inclusive with gaited breeds.

It's a simply put great read:)
https://www.triplecrownfeed.com/insulin-resistant/
 

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Arabs are desert bred, their Gene pool is used to existing on nothing.

TWH's by and large are very easy keepers. All of mine have been air ferns.

Their Foundation Mare Of Record is a Morgan -- they are also easy keepers.

You're dedicated to the good health and well being of your horses, you might be interested in this article I posted a few days back, if you haven't seen it:)

It talks about changes in what we should look for in hay analysis.

https://drkhorsesense.wordpress.com...SdzCV0KEhlIkt2JOYeEqnV5y_h0vEz1RBvbzIPAsShWuw

Here's a link from Tiple Crown with a paragraph that briefly mentions certain breeds having a better ability to store fat than other breeds. It is all inclusive with gaited breeds.

It's a simply put great read:)
https://www.triplecrownfeed.com/insulin-resistant/
Very interesting. Learning even more things about other breeds! Love it!

I can only imagine what the article triple crown feed has. I'm sure it's a great read for the basic reader who's never heard of the condition. Hopefully there are a few people reading this post because it's something all horse owners should be familiar with.

I don't want to begin counting how many articles I've read on hyperinsulinaemia and vet run tests that lead to the diagnoses, EMS, laminitis, colic, metritis, pituitary dysfunction and many others. I've gone into researching which breeds are more predisposed to getting any forms of EMS like Nordic ponies, Walkers, Andalusians vs breeds like standarbreds being breeds that are not as likely to get it.

The environment for sure is a huge contributor. You should start a topic on it. Love that kind of subject.

Returning this about the Canadian breed:smile:



 
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