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Discussion Starter #1
My soon to be horse is a great little QH except for 2 things...

1. When he canters I fly. He's not collected at all and I can actually hear myself flying back in to the seat. He's young too (91/2) so I think he thinks it means just go for it. Any tips? Or training ideas?

and

2. Whenever we go an trail rides and it's a narrow dip, not neccasarily deep but short and narrow instead of stepping into it he COMPLETELY pulls back his weight and not jumps but LAUNCHES over it. I can actually feel his body going back and lanching forward. I haven't fallen off, but I HATE jumping and that means I absolutely hate this. Plus, I worry he might slip one day and lose his footing. A horse behind me did that...so scary. All the other horses will step into it, but when it's my turn everyone has to clear out so he doesn't smack into them because he ends at his flying canter.

Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 

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Lots of transitions. walk trot walk trot canter walk stop back walk trot.
You need to get it were he listens to you with in a step. Then when you get to a dip say whoa. Make him take one step and stop. Let him put his head down and sniff. Take a step head down and sniff.
Canter him a few strides as he speeds up stop him or go to the walk. Don't let him canter half a lap and then ask.
If you take to long to ask him to slow down he will never learn that he can canter slower. As he starts to respond to your changing his gaits. Then you can start working on collecting them. First at the walk and then at the trot and finally at the canter.
 

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I agree. Get him thinking SLOW. The second you ask him to go faster, only do a couple strides and bring him right back down to you.
 

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Jumping over ditches... Get yourself a snaffle bit; curbs are ouchy for this sort of thing. Ride him up to the ditch. When you feel him leaning back on his haunches, pull his head to the side. Continue towards, toward the ditch, with his head to the side in a sort of pseudo shoulders in. He shouldn't be able to jump in that position.

And in the very least, he won't be able to jump it comfortably. It may take a bit of back and forth across the ditch and little jumps, but soon he'll find jumping exhausting and frustrating. The first time he walks across the ditch, pet him and keep going down the trail.


Also, don't approach the ditch in a straight line; come from an angle. That makes them less inclined to leap.
 

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I'm going to disagree with the previous posters on the cantering thing. Currently, cantering is super fun and exciting to him because you probably canter him, he gets too fast within a couple of strides, so you stop and maybe try again, right? What you want to do is making cantering not exciting and help him learn to rate himself.
So, you want to get him into a canter and every time he tries to go faster, you push him even harder until he's pretty much flying. Then, when you feel him starting to slow/trying to fall out, you HAVE to keep pushing him. Push him until he's super tired of cantering and isn't trying to go faster. Push him until he's literally begging to stop. You might have to do that a couple of times but he will get the message loud and clearly, pretty quickly.

Also, more horses feel rewarded by a break, so by stopping him/making him walk when he gets too fast at the canter may be inadvertently rewarding him and ensuring the behavior you do not want, aka cantering super fast.

I can tell you that my mare used to canter in a similar way. She'd always be cantering full speed and she couldn't seem to rate herself at all. This last year when I started riding her on the trail a bunch, I started cantering her for longer periods n the trail and really getting comfortable with her gait. I had noticed that she started getting more controllable and a little slower but I figured it was nothing. Then, this past summer when I started riding her in an arena again, I discovered that her canter was so much slower and more easily controllable than it was before, for real. Cantering had become much less exciting to her because she was used to it and it wasn't some big treat she got at an unknown point for an unknown period of time, you know?


Is there any way you can lunge him or lead him repeatedly over this ditch? If you can lunge/lead him over it a few times and help him figure out how maneuver it (and that it's not exciting at all) from the ground, I bet you'll get better results from the saddle. He's probably just not sure if he can walk through it/over it and so he's jumping it to avoid any "danger" that might be lurking there. haha

Good luck!
 

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I'm going to disagree with the previous posters on the cantering thing. Currently, cantering is super fun and exciting to him because you probably canter him, he gets too fast within a couple of strides, so you stop and maybe try again, right? What you want to do is making cantering not exciting and help him learn to rate himself.
So, you want to get him into a canter and every time he tries to go faster, you push him even harder until he's pretty much flying. Then, when you feel him starting to slow/trying to fall out, you HAVE to keep pushing him. Push him until he's super tired of cantering and isn't trying to go faster. Push him until he's literally begging to stop. You might have to do that a couple of times but he will get the message loud and clearly, pretty quickly.

Also, more horses feel rewarded by a break, so by stopping him/making him walk when he gets too fast at the canter may be inadvertently rewarding him and ensuring the behavior you do not want, aka cantering super fast.

I can tell you that my mare used to canter in a similar way. She'd always be cantering full speed and she couldn't seem to rate herself at all. This last year when I started riding her on the trail a bunch, I started cantering her for longer periods n the trail and really getting comfortable with her gait. I had noticed that she started getting more controllable and a little slower but I figured it was nothing. Then, this past summer when I started riding her in an arena again, I discovered that her canter was so much slower and more easily controllable than it was before, for real. Cantering had become much less exciting to her because she was used to it and it wasn't some big treat she got at an unknown point for an unknown period of time, you know?


Is there any way you can lunge him or lead him repeatedly over this ditch? If you can lunge/lead him over it a few times and help him figure out how maneuver it (and that it's not exciting at all) from the ground, I bet you'll get better results from the saddle. He's probably just not sure if he can walk through it/over it and so he's jumping it to avoid any "danger" that might be lurking there. haha

Good luck!
While running faster & longer may have slowed your mare down more times than not it won't. I've retrained a bunch of too fast or out of control horses by the walk/canter/walk method. You'd have to run a long time over varied terrain to tire a fit horse enough so it wants to go slow, too risky for my likes. I don't want to ride fast at the beginning of rides so I can ride slower at the ends.

I like your ditch advice.
 

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While running faster & longer may have slowed your mare down more times than not it won't. I've retrained a bunch of too fast or out of control horses by the walk/canter/walk method. You'd have to run a long time over varied terrain to tire a fit horse enough so it wants to go slow, too risky for my likes. I don't want to ride fast at the beginning of rides so I can ride slower at the ends.
I agree. Using W/T/C transitions has always worked for me in reinforcing the idea that you always own control over the 'gas' and 'brakes' whether it's when your horse is fresh on the way out or wanting to rush home on the way in.
 
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The problem with pushing them faster till there tired and them pushing them more to tell them you are the boss holds lots of risks. One you risk injuring your horse especially if they are unfit. Two if you are a not advanced rider you run the risk of loosing all control.
You can lunge for respect witch will also help you when riding also if you understand lunging and how to do it properly.
The ideal of the changing of transitions it to reward them for listening to you and changing when you want them to. Horses do not hold on to the thought process long enough to thing that hay I just got rewarded for going faster. They are focusing on the stop or the slow down. If they do not stop or slow down when you ask them then they get backed or turned in a circle depending on what you were asking them to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Is there any way you can lunge him or lead him repeatedly over this ditch? If you can lunge/lead him over it a few times and help him figure out how maneuver it (and that it's not exciting at all) from the ground, I bet you'll get better results from the saddle. He's probably just not sure if he can walk through it/over it and so he's jumping it to avoid any "danger" that might be lurking there. haha

Good luck!
I sat that launch about 2 times but by the third time I was sick of it and led him over it, same thing...pull back and fling. It's pretty much like a slingshot effect.
 

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The only problem is he even starts out fast. He doesn't know slow canters exist I guess. I've been on a thouroughbred whose canter is slower....that's pretty bad in my book. So unless he's going straight from a trot to a run, which I'm pretty sure he's not, he's just flying.
 

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Jumping over ditches... Get yourself a snaffle bit; curbs are ouchy for this sort of thing. Ride him up to the ditch. When you feel him leaning back on his haunches, pull his head to the side. Continue towards, toward the ditch, with his head to the side in a sort of pseudo shoulders in. He shouldn't be able to jump in that position.

And in the very least, he won't be able to jump it comfortably. It may take a bit of back and forth across the ditch and little jumps, but soon he'll find jumping exhausting and frustrating. The first time he walks across the ditch, pet him and keep going down the trail.


Also, don't approach the ditch in a straight line; come from an angle. That makes them less inclined to leap.

He is in a snaffle. And that might work, thanks!
 
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