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Discussion Starter #22
I am finding that, because I have tried different farriers in the past that everyone has there own way of doing things. Nutty Saddler- you say its not the fault of the farrier, I dont trim my horses feet so I dont know what you mean by it not being the farriers fault on how he "got like this". I dont think anyone knows that there horses feet are not in good shape (unless there a farrier) until something drastic is done like my guys where its obvious and doesnt look right and your horse ends up lame, or you have a different farrier come out and point out whats going on. I dont know hoof angles or fancy tricks to trimming I just know that my horses feet are not as good as they were, good and strong. They have gone downhill quick. I know you woldnt be able to put shoes on his feet the way they are because of his heals looking so unbalanced and thats what made me think wow he didnt do a good job at all and of course the severe lameness afterwards. Like I said, he is much better yesterday when I went to see him, hardly lame at all and full of fire. Although very bruised on his sole from what I could see when I cleaned out the sore one, he seems ok just needs to be rebalanced to start rebuilding healthy feeties.
 

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a good half inch of toe off both his front feet and then just sort of left his heals from what it looks like.

For one thing, cutting the toe off short from the bottom will cause lameness due to the cutting of sole to accomodate the shorter toe. Also you said he pared the sole out. BAD, do not allow this for a barefoot horse from the frog forward. The callous protects the tender new sole undneath. The softness you notice is due to excessive sole being pared out. I would like to see a flat on view of the sole also.. Based on what I see from your pics I will say the hoof wall at the front is too short BECAUSE the farrier cut sole. If your horse had a nice callous built up and it was removed thar ya be.. I am sorry your horse has been in so much discomfort.. I will boot or bute for very sore feet if this happens, which it does not anymore since my trimmer rocks. Many farriers think that an underrun heel is a low heel, not true.. Underrun heels need to be pulled back to the widest part of the frog by rasping. This sounds like it shortens the heel but in fact it does not. Beveling or rolling the toe agressively will help to build the hoof to discourage underrun heels. But excessive trimming wall from the bottom is not good.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Appyt- When I took the pics I was looking at his feet and I think if he would have cut anymore off his toes, he would have bled. They are short! Can you explain to me about the callous in the hoof? I have seen this on barefoot horses, is this something that makes a healthy strong hoof? (sorry if I sound like an dumb dumb..haha) I am all about barefoot, not against shoes but I dont have a use for them being as I dont ride on really hard terrain like gravel or rocks. I want to get his feet nice and strong but want to know what I am looking at. Its soo hard like I said as every farrier does things different, and always has a reason, and I dont want to tell them what I want and have them look at me like im nutz!
 

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LOL You must be young.. I could care less if someone looks at me like I'm nuts. Ok, first you need to do some online research on barefoot hoof trimming. I always point people who want to learn about this to my trimmers site first. She has very good info and links to other reputable trim related sites. Study, learn, ask questions and print stuff out for your farrier(if s/he is willing to learn). Discuss and cuss if you must. I happened into barefoot trimming when I decided to not shoe any longer as the expense was rediculous as I wasn't riding often. I was simply looking for someone to trim my horses and fell into barefoot trim info.. I am very happy with it. You can learn to do your horses hooves yourself if you cannot find anyone willing or able to do it. Here is a really good page on trimming.
 

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Sorry I didn't really answer your question on the toe callous. You have seen this so I don't have to show it to you. TG cuz I can never find a good pic when I need it. ;) Yes it makes the hoof stronger as the coffin bone is somewhat supported by it. Think of a shoe you might wear on city streets but you wouldn't wear it on gravel as the sole is too think and you would feel the rocks. Think of a shoe that is thicker soled and you don't feel the gravel underfoot. The sole is to cover and protect the inner hoof. The wall is to cover and protect the same thing but from a different direction. Both are to built to support the weight of the horse. Wall, sole and frog all contribute to a healthy hoof. I hope that helped.
 

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Hi, I just thought I would jump in here since you were looking for a certified farrier.

I am not a certified farrier but I have taken a seminar that was hosted by a Strasser Hoofcare Professional and the clinician was the President of the Equine Soundness Association also known as the ESA (Strasser method training in North America).

From what I see from the picture, your horses heels are uneven and are starting to become underrun. Now, my horse went lame after 6 weeks of shoes and developed a crack that started at the coronary band and went all the way down to the ground. I was unable to get my regular farrier out so I called this lady that did barefoot. Found out later that she is SHP CERTIFIED and I haven't looked back.

One thing that I must stress is that correcting/healing your horse is going to take much more than just trimming. You must look at your horse's metabolism, living conditions and environment in order for the healing process to progress.

There are many people out there that are quick to slam Strasser but I also think that those people need to look at the whole picture as to what it takes to heal the horse. Also, yes, I am sorry, I am on a Strasser rant here, all SHPs must go for yearly recertification in order to hold onto the SHP status. Another note of interest, is that the President of the ESA is also a VETERINARIAN, therefore, all SHPs have vet advice at their convienience.

Plus, the Strasser trimming course is now a 2 year course! I am very sorry but I would rather have someone that went to school for 2 years work on my horse than someone who took a weekend trimming course and is out trimming for a living....

I am not saying that all other natural trimmers don't know what they are doing, kudos to them for promoting the barefoot movement!

I urge you to read Dr. Strasser's book - A Lifetime of Soundness and to visit the ESA North America website Natural Hoof Care, Strasser Hoof, Laminitis, Navicular, Coffin Bone
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Horse Hippie- I will look into reading that. I have my farrier coming out tonight so will write in an update when I get home tonight!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
UPDATE!!

I had my farrier come out and not just this guy, but both my geldings heels are underrun...not severely but he is going to fix them. Also was able to squish my geldings feet from the huge amount of moisture in his feet. Was kind of gross. Thanks to everyone for there input on this matter, you guys all opened my eyes to bad feet (shame on me)...but thanks to everyone, we are on the road to recovery!
 

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That is great news! Keep us posted on his recovery! From the pictures that you sent, it doesn't look that bad and shouldn't be to complicated to correct. As for the mushy hooves, all hooves do need access to water every day. I would make sure that you do soak the hooves every day. Submerse in water for about 10-15 minutes - make sure the water comes above the coronary band. A good idea is to make a mudhole in front of your water trough, that way your horses will have to stand in it when they drink.

Good Luck! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Horse Hippie- isnt too much moisture bad? he was concerned that he could move his whole hoof and squish it with his hands.. like he could almost squeeze his bulbs together (not literally) but not good he said. He was concerned. The biggest issue is that they are in a pen and when it rains its gross in there, I dont have pasture to put them in so I have to take them out daily to dry ground. It sucks! but I love my ponies so I do it for them :)
 

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No Paintgurl, Hooves do not need to be soaked daily. I would say in general it is healthier to be too dry for a bit than too wet. As you are experiencing a waterlogged hoof is not the best thing as it allows easier entry of greebles as well as a higher possibility of puncture wounds. However, hooves can and do manage to survive extreems. Do what you can and the weather will change.. It always does. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I had him out hand grazing yesterday to get on dry ground and wasnt so lame after I picked out his feet and such (they were packed full of mud and crap as you could imagine) but we were walking around and he was walking ok, just needs to get them feeties hardened!!
 

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Oh, I didn't realize he was in such soft ground - sorry! No, he doesn't need water then. My horses are on 24/7 365 days a year turnount, so I have to get my horses hooves access to water everyday, just imagine what your fingernails would be like if they received no moisture....

I don't know what diet your horse is on, but you might be able to supplement him to help him harden his hooves. I just finished an interesting book - "Healing Horses - Their Way" and have actually contacted the author on a few things. I am sure she would help you find something natural to help out. This is the website - www.rivasremedies.com - she is from British Columbia.

It is good to hear that you are taking your guys out onto hard ground everyday - movement will definately help the healing process. Keep that circulation going and help the blood stream take out any toxins that may be stored under those under run heels.

I am totally impressed with this thread, lots of info! Keep us posted!
 

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Not a problem! I went barefoot a year ago and am now in the process of revamping my feeding program. Same with my vaccination program, de-worming program - like the name says, I am turning into a HORSE HIPPIE - GET IN TUNE WITH THE EARTH AND YOUR HORSE'S SOUL! My husband thinks I am a freak...ha ha ha ha!
 
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