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The BO called me this morning at 6:30, said that he had choked and she was calling the vet. I rushed right there, well, carefully in the snow we were getting this morning.

choke is scary. he was handling it better than i thought. runny snots and all.

the vet got there, sedated him and started tubing. having never seen it done before it was interesting and a little scary. i'm having a hard time getting through work as all i keep thinking about is checking on him.

the vet told us to give him only water till he's off the sedative, and then he can have mushy mushy stuff.

not the way I wanted this new year to start. He's 30 this year.

i've read that horses are more prone to choke if they've done it before. Is this really true? if precautions are taken, isn't it easy enough to prevent?
 

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Yes it can be prevented can't ever feed dry pellets again,i have a gelding who's choked 3 diffrent times now. So i have to make his pellets soupy and spread them out in a old water trough. Slows him down he tends to gulp his food.

Once they'v choked they are prone to choke again,if your careful he should be ok. Make sure you keep up on his dental checks,very important. My 29 year old mare gets checked 2 times a year. Sometime needs teeth done twice a year. Yes she still has all her teeth kind of amazing.

Hope the old man is feeling better soon.:wink:
 

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i guess his grain is what caused it. the BO wasn't soaking that. (she will now, Vets orders. ) he doesn't have many teeth left. He does get checked once a year, as there's only a few teeth on one side.
 

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Not the same case as yours, but we had a gelding that would eat his grain too quickly if he wasn't fed hay first. Thus he would choke, every single time. However, if we gave him hay first and fed everyone else before graining him, he would eat at a normal pace and not choke.
 

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It is so scary...I had an old TB mare who choked. I did not realize the feed I got was beet pulp based, in substitution for mine that they were out of!

Thankfully, I was describing this incident to my friend on Monday, as on Tuesday, a horse I was selling to her boyfriend choked. They would not have known what it was.....
 

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Not the same case as yours, but we had a gelding that would eat his grain too quickly if he wasn't fed hay first. Thus he would choke, every single time. However, if we gave him hay first and fed everyone else before graining him, he would eat at a normal pace and not choke.
when he had enough teeth to eat hay this is what she would do at the barn. its what i would do to when he was at home.

he takes big mouthfuls of his grain..
 

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It is so scary...I had an old TB mare who choked. I did not realize the feed I got was beet pulp based, in substitution for mine that they were out of!

Thankfully, I was describing this incident to my friend on Monday, as on Tuesday, a horse I was selling to her boyfriend choked. They would not have known what it was.....

now that you say that. i believe the senior she put him on has beet pulp in it..... ooohhh..just started a few days ago with it. crap. i'm reading the bag when i stop.
 

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My Appy bolts his food. Where I had him boarded before they let the horses eat next to each other in the field and their one horse kept running him off his food so he started eating it faster which led to, you guessed it, him choking. He choked the first time and then after they (unbeknownst to me) never soaked his grain so he just kept choking. I found out the day I moved them that he had been choking at least once a week. Well thank you for telling me this!
Now that he's home with me he's on the mushiest of the mush and I haven't had an issue.

Choke can be scary. My old man doesn't have any teeth left so he gets a mush of hay pellets and his senior feed. He also gets one flake of hay twice a day because he just wastes it. When I find a bale of hay that's really, really soft and has smaller pieces I set that aside for him when he's in his stall. He's never choked ~knock on wood~ and I plan to keep it that way =)
 

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now that you say that. i believe the senior she put him on has beet pulp in it..... ooohhh..just started a few days ago with it. crap. i'm reading the bag when i stop.

Is there any way you could spread out his food? so he can't take big mouthfuls. I use a big water trough that is no longer used for water. My gelding choked on soaked pellets taking huge mouthfuls.

Have found by spreading it out he can't take big mouthfuls so doesn't choke himself. If you can't spread it out i'd be sure its soupy enough so it doesn't choke him up again.

Choke is very scary so i do all i can to prevent it,my gelding kinda gets freaked out when he chokes so not fun at all.:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My Appy bolts his food. Where I had him boarded before they let the horses eat next to each other in the field and their one horse kept running him off his food so he started eating it faster which led to, you guessed it, him choking. He choked the first time and then after they (unbeknownst to me) never soaked his grain so he just kept choking. I found out the day I moved them that he had been choking at least once a week. Well thank you for telling me this!
Now that he's home with me he's on the mushiest of the mush and I haven't had an issue.

Choke can be scary. My old man doesn't have any teeth left so he gets a mush of hay pellets and his senior feed. He also gets one flake of hay twice a day because he just wastes it. When I find a bale of hay that's really, really soft and has smaller pieces I set that aside for him when he's in his stall. He's never choked ~knock on wood~ and I plan to keep it that way =)
Is there any way you could spread out his food? so he can't take big mouthfuls. I use a big water trough that is no longer used for water. My gelding choked on soaked pellets taking huge mouthfuls.

Have found by spreading it out he can't take big mouthfuls so doesn't choke himself. If you can't spread it out i'd be sure its soupy enough so it doesn't choke him up again.

Choke is very scary so i do all i can to prevent it,my gelding kinda gets freaked out when he chokes so not fun at all.:wink:
i'm planning on bringin my guy home soon (house hunting in the spring), he will be getting mush everything in a large table top type feeder, so he doesn't bolt it down.
 

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My friends 6 year old mare chocked maybe a month ago. In the evening my friend called and said that her mare stopped eating and is coughing, what to do? like big, deep, cleaning cough. I went there (live close by) and saw the mare who was a bit upset about something. When I touched her throat, she started coughing. She didn't want water, but was breathing fine. Logic hit in, I checked if she can breathe faster - asked her to trot a little, then massaged her neck again - again some cough. A while later she returned to eating, as we let her be. She chocked on eating a beat root - ones they grow for animals to eat - not cut up, she was biting chunks herself.

The vet came the next day, because she was coughing bad in the morning again. Tubed her - food pipe clean. She said she cannot check the air pipe, but she is breathing fine.
They started some anti cough meds - something helped for a while, started again. Then different meds - didn't help.
Mycotoxin catcher worked while it was given, but at some point she still coughed. So that is not it either.
Owner is now looking for money, and better weather, to call the vet out to check her teeth (6, almost 7 yr old mare). Keeps good weight, no real suspicion on teeth just this choke and cough.
If the teeth don't show the problem, then a bronchoscopy will be in order.. but going by cheapest options first..
Also, there is suspicion that she has 'roaring'? As in the flap closes the airways and she becomes distressed. Which could be, as she sometimes starts having gurgling breathing, cough, and heavy breathing even though she hasn't been worked much.. on other days she is fine. She is our dilemma.


I am glad to hear your horse is fine now, soaked feed should prevent it.. and slowing eating process down. Hope it doesn't happen again :) best wishes :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
how long till he's back to himself? i checked on him on my way home, he nickered to me but otherwise was blah. the vet gave him buscopan, banamine, and excede.
 

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It could be any where from 3 days to a week,he's old so they don't always bounce back as fast. Last choke my gelding had it took him a week to finally feel better.
 

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its heartbreaking to see him blah, he's always been full of spunk. crossing my fingers he bounces back in a few days.
 

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Do soak everything. I would even consider not feeding him ANY hay if his teeth are so bad.

Give him buckets of mush, 3x/day. Little to no hay. The hay is to make him feel special. If you do this make sure it's soft. Make sure he gets lots of forage in his mush (not just senior grain- hay pellets/alfalfa/beet pulp)

No there isn't anything wrong with beet pulp..

If he bolts put rocks in the bottom of his pan.

I like beet pulp, hay pellets, senior feed plus extras if need be all mashed together, 3x/day is the minimum if he can't eat hay.

Glad he's OK and the BO has instructions, soaking is very important and can't be skipped.
 
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