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My (dog/cat) rescue has been networking this little guy for a home/rescue, but we ended up taking him in ourselves!


Here are some pictures and part of his story:

"Meet Cody, a 9 week old Andalusian colt who was born completely blind, due to his eyes not being fully developed. Cody was very thankful to have been born to an owner who, rather then ending his life prematurely and unnecessarily, chose to give him a chance at a full and happy life. Cody's owners reached out to the rescue community for help in finding a suitable home/rescue for him, as they knew it would take a special person to commit the next 30+ years to him and his special needs. Being the plea originator for Cody's plight in finding a home/rescue, LEASH Animal Rescue grew deeply committed to making sure this little guy found the knowledgeable and permanent home that he needed in order to be brought up properly and be able to grow up to live a happy, normal life. LEASH Animal Rescue agreed to take Cody into their rescue on a "sanctuary basis", meaning that the rescue will be a forever home for Cody, and he will never be at risk of ending up in the wrong hands, at an auction, or sent off to slaughter."

"While Cody was handled from time of birth to 2 weeks of age, for the following 5 weeks, Cody did not have much human contact at all. By the time Cody was 7 weeks old, he had become frightened of human contact and due to his lack of vision grew into the habit of walking, trotting, and cantering in small circles in his stall. When Cody was 7 weeks old, I had the pleasure of meeting him for the first time and being the first person to work with him since 2 weeks of age. In just a little over an hour, Cody went from cantering in circles in fear to standing next to me with a rope around his neck, letting me pet him."

"I have been visiting and working with Cody at least once a week since I first met him, and he has improved a lot! His circling has gone down quite a bit, now that his fear of humans has been eliminated and he is now more sure of where he can go in his stall. It took a few visits to get him used to being touched all over his body (face, ears, tummy, hind end, legs, etc.), and now he is getting used... to his legs being picked up. Cody is now halter broke (with assistance from his prior owners), he is used to being brushed, and he has been introduced to the noise a scary plastic bag makes (a nightmare for most horses!). Getting used to a spray water bottle (and then eventually fly spray) is on his agenda. We have also been working more on his leading, and he is starting to get a hang of the concept."



2 weeks old:





Newer pictures-

First time being touched by a human in 5 weeks-


With his mom the same day-


About 2 weeks later-
 

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I saw him on FB a few days ago and was praying he'd end up somewhere safe. I would have loved to offer a home, as I have experience with blind horses and they are the most amazing, resilient creatures, but unfortunately I was on the wrong side of the country. Looking forward to updates!
 

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Are you guys keeping him at Tanzanite?? I might have to come out and see this little guy!
 

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You do know you could turn him into a full riding horse right? I have met a few completely blind horses who have become fantastic trail horses. I recently saw a documentary called -wild horse wild ride, where a young fellow broke his mustang to trust him undersaddle to the point where he started riding the horse up and down HUGE hills and uneven terrain, completely blindfolded.
It can be done, if you`re dedicated to keep and working with the horse long term, and you build a good bond with him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You do know you could turn him into a full riding horse right? I have met a few completely blind horses who have become fantastic trail horses. I recently saw a documentary called -wild horse wild ride, where a young fellow broke his mustang to trust him undersaddle to the point where he started riding the horse up and down HUGE hills and uneven terrain, completely blindfolded.
It can be done, if you`re dedicated to keep and working with the horse long term, and you build a good bond with him.
That is what I am kind of hoping for! If his legs check out to be okay (due to his circling when he was younger), when he is older I would like to try to work with him under saddle and see how he does. He would make a cool dressage horse!! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you everybody for your comments! I will definitely try to keep this thread updated, but will also be using his FB page heavily, so please go "like" it if you are on FB!! :)

I look forward to keep working with him and watching him continue to improve.
 

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What is the facebook page?
 

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In a different lifetime, I would applaud this rescue for taking on this colt, and he certainly is cute.

But I assume you have limited spaces. Why do rescues take on the very sick or disabled horses when so many good ridable horses are being shipped every week? I'd really rather the spot be taken up by horses that can be adopted and don't need to ship to slaughter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
In a different lifetime, I would applaud this rescue for taking on this colt, and he certainly is cute.

But I assume you have limited spaces. Why do rescues take on the very sick or disabled horses when so many good ridable horses are being shipped every week? I'd really rather the spot be taken up by horses that can be adopted and don't need to ship to slaughter.
Our rescue is actually a dog/cat rescue that runs 100% on foster homes (we don't actively board dogs/cats at our vet, etc., or have a rescue facility yet), but since we have 3 horses in our family (not rescue horses), we were able to rescue Cody. The rescue has never taken in a horse before (only dogs/cats), but having a rescue and having experience with horses (blind horses too) made it easier for us to rescue him. Cody will not be at a boarding facility, but will actually end up at the horse property my family is purchasing.

Since Cody came into our rescue on a "sanctuary basis", he won't be up for adoption, so even if he can never be ridden, nobody will ever have to worry about that, as he is now guaranteed a happy and safe lifetime where he will be kept and accepted regardless of "what he can do".-- So in other words, for this very special case, our rescue would not have rescued a healthy horse simply because our rescue isn't a horse rescue per-say. So in a sense, it is actually better that we rescued him, versus a full-blown horse rescue, as now he won't be taking up the space/resources that full-blown horse rescue could be spending on other horses.

In a more general response to your concern, rescues do rescue both healthy and ill/injured animals because regardless of their situation, they need to be given a chance. It is not their fault they were allowed to get ill, injured, or were discarded like garbage from the human race.
 
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