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I'm from Australia and I'd never heard of the Coggin's test before, and none of our horses have had it (the test I mean). Is the disease only in the US?
 

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I'm not sure what the formal name is what we call it swamp fever, and it's in Canada too. There is no cure for it, some horses don't develop the disease that are carriers and can pass on the fatal disease. Testing is the only way to eradicate it, positive testing horses are either isolated for the rest of their lives which is pretty impossible because it's passed on by biting insects so they have to be netted over or euthanized.
 

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The coggins is a test for Equine Infectious Anemia
 

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Yes to what the previous posters said.

In the U.S., if you do anything off your property with your horses, you need a current coggins document from your vet.

The vet will draw blood, plus take a digital picture of your horse that shows its markings (or no markings). That is because people are notorious for only spending money to get one coggins test done and use those papers on a couple of horses if they can get away with it.

That picture will appear on your coggins document when the vet gives it to you, so check your document right away to be sure the pic and written description matches the horse named on the document:)

When the blood results come back, hopefully negative, you then get your coggins document for each horse. Have an extra copy in a safe place because it's best to leave one copy in the glove box of the truck that pulls the horse trailer so you always have it with you:)

The U.S. States I have lived in require a new coggins document annually, which means a new blood test, new picture, and write another check:). I THINK there may be some states that require a new one every six months. This is a question for your local vet:)
 

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No idea why its called Coggins in US. In Europe we know it as a test for Equine Infectious Anemia (like LoriF said).
 

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Coggins was the name of the vet who developed the test for this disease.
 

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There has been an outbreak in Arizona. Some of the mustangs they bring in to train in Florence at the prison tested positive. Fortunately that is a few hours away from me but as we are buying two horses that's the first question I ask.
 

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There has been an outbreak in Arizona. Some of the mustangs they bring in to train in Florence at the prison tested positive. Fortunately that is a few hours away from me but as we are buying two horses that's the first question I ask.
If horses you are buying are near a place where there has been an outbreak, I would ask that a fresh coggins be pulled.
 

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If horses you are buying are near a place where there has been an outbreak, I would ask that a fresh coggins be pulled.
^^^This.

Reason being, a negative coggins done yesterday, can be no good tomorrow, if the right mosquito(s) bit the horse today.
 

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I'm from Australia and I'd never heard of the Coggin's test before, and none of our horses have had it (the test I mean). Is the disease only in the US?
Be glad if it has not arrived down under....yet.

Equine Infectious Anemia is basically the HIV of the equine world with no cure and most often fatal. It is passed on via body fluids. Everyone thinks of the blood transfer of which horse flies are the biggest culprits, but milk or other body fluids also pass it on.

It is present on pretty much everywhere else. Europe, Asia, (Eurasia), Africa, North and South America. The US has had relatively few outbreaks for the past decade, fewer than 100 a year for the last 10 years, which is a pretty small number for a nation with more horses than any other nation (between 9-10 million). in the US Texas might be the only state that ALWAYS seems to have positive test results every year and has had the most significant outbreaks of it in the past. Followed I believe by it's neighbor, Oklahoma (funny thing how those horseflies don't respect State borders)

Sadly it is a disease that could be totally eradicated with a few years of serious effort by all nations. Make testing mandatory for all equines (no exceptions...even feral Mustangs would have to be tested) and require any animals that test positive be destroyed. Unfortunately, many countries (even some States in the US) do not require testing unless you are going to transport the horse across State lines. So long as the horse never leaves a State it doesn't have to be tested. If all equines world wide were tested annually for 5 years and any infected where destroyed then at the very least the last two years of the 5 should yield no positive test results for any animal and that would be the end of the disease. Not requiring testing and keeping alive infected animals that don't die (some actually survive it and are carriers...in places where destroying them is not mandatory some owners insist on keeping them since they've survived it) insures it will never go away.
 
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We had an outbreak in my area in the late 90s. An organic farming commune from up north travelled to this area with their work horses, after the government ordered them off public land. Some of their draft horses and their draft stud had swamp fever. People's horses in a nearby field to where they moved were infected as well. We had to have Coggins pulled monthly to go to any shows, clinics, anything. The organic commune members had to disband because everybody had lawsuits against them, because they knew their horses were sick and they did nothing about it. In fact they kept breeding their sick stallion. When it was discovered it was their horses infecting the neighbouring horses, they refused to put their horses down. That's when the uproar started. Eventually all their horses were put down by court order. That was a nightmare here!
 

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There has been an outbreak in Arizona. Some of the mustangs they bring in to train in Florence at the prison tested positive. Fortunately that is a few hours away from me but as we are buying two horses that's the first question I ask.

Speaking of which... anyone else remember the person that was here early in the spring/late in the winter, trying to see if anyone could help them track several truck loads of mustang/feral foals that had been sold as 'Navajo round up' foals and a few mares, but most were orphaned and too young to be separated, and they'd lost track of the trucks somewhere in Oklahoma, Missouri and Arkansas and were thought to be headed to Texas? And none had their Coggins and were leaving a wake of Coggins behind them?


A local guy here turned up with EIGHTY unhandled mares and foals for sale not long after that... I have no idea where TH he got them or what he was doing with them - he's not a horseman and he doesn't handle livestock. No idea what he did with them - they looked pretty rough, bad build, unhealthy, sicklyish.


And then Kaufman Kill Pen in Texas has had an outbreak this summer and I can't help but wonder....
 

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Slightly off subject, but I just saw on the news certain states have an outbreak of EEE (eastern equine encephalitis) which is potentially fatal to humans? I have not researched it yet, but the states are providing free bug spray to prevent mosquito bites.

With mustangs being overpopulated and testing positive for EIA, it seems nature is taking care of the problem on its own. Now we have to worry about keeping our horses safe with the capture and transport of mustangs or any others within the vicinity of them.
 

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The kill pens are the worst spreaders of EIA outside the wild herds, especially now that so many have a side gig of selling horses out of the pens to who knows where and putting horses on trucks to go all over the country. And you can't tell me that every 'sorrel quarter horse gelding with a left rear sock' is getting tested-- most of the dealers have boxes of Coggins and paperwork from horses they sent to slaughter, so they just flip through and find a current one that looks pretty close, then sell the horse with a 'valid Coggins test and health papers.'

Several of the kill lots have had problems with EIA, and who knows how many horses have been on the premises then to other places, but since you aren't required to test if the horse isn't traveling, there are probably quite a few horses out there who are positive and spreading it, but have never been tested.

Ten horses in Iowa were euthanized and 30 others exposed in Polk county, Iowa. Two were confirmed last year in the same county-- it's unknown if it was the same farm. That's a little close to home considering how awful the flies were this year. The incubation period can be up to 2 months, so a horse can certainly do a lot of travel between his last test and when he exhibits enough signs to be seen by another vet.
 

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In pine county eastern central Minnesota had a EIA positive horse. Horse was recently purchased ,and was discovered it was positive EIA. Horse was quarantined then later euthanized. This was in August this summer.

So who knows where this horse had been prior to it being ,discovered it was positive coggins.
 

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The alarming thing is... your horse can be clear of it, have a negative Coggins test, be just fine, you travel with your papers... gets exposed/contracts it... it's 2 months LATER in some cases before it's showing symptoms... and you've traveled all over the place with them in the meantime, with the right papers.


That's one of those things that I can sit around and worry about if I just let my mind have free rein.
 

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Slightly off subject, but I just saw on the news certain states have an outbreak of EEE (eastern equine encephalitis) which is potentially fatal to humans? I have not researched it yet, but the states are providing free bug spray to prevent mosquito bites.

With mustangs being overpopulated and testing positive for EIA, it seems nature is taking care of the problem on its own. Now we have to worry about keeping our horses safe with the capture and transport of mustangs or any others within the vicinity of them.

I've seen the alarm on the EEE. I've not heard of anyone anywhere near us actually having it.


I HAVE seen that VS got a little out of hand this summer in Texas and parts of Oklahoma. Sheesh.


Speaking of the Mustangs - Nature is all about balance. Biology 101 in college taught me that Nature has her own methods of population control. Predators, starvation/limited resources, and disease = death and therefore population controls.



We've inadvertently taken out the predators. So they aren't there to cull the herds, keep the numbers down. It's no longer a case of the fittest survive as far as predator loses go. Starvation is trying to do it's job, but we're kinda interfering there. Disease... we're due a big plague we can't beat with science and medicine ourselves. I suspect with that many feral horses packed into holding pens and feed lots, it's just a matter of time before something spreads like wildfire and yes, takes care of the problem Man has helped create.
 
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It has been a bad year for EEE in New England, with horse deaths and human deaths in MA and CT: https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2...mosquito-borne-risk-new-england-massachusetts

Lots of discussion about why there is a horse vaccine but not a human one (and let’s not get started on why there is no human Lyme vaccine or effective treatment). If it’s not profitable for big pharma then we can forget it...
 

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It has been a bad year for EEE in New England, with horse deaths and human deaths in MA and CT: https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2...mosquito-borne-risk-new-england-massachusetts

Lots of discussion about why there is a horse vaccine but not a human one (and let’s not get started on why there is no human Lyme vaccine or effective treatment). If it’s not profitable for big pharma then we can forget it...
In this day and age, aspirin wouldn't even be approved. Not enough money in it, or if they did approve it, it would 50 bucks a tablet. And, if I did choose to chew on white willow bark instead, I'm sure there would be plenty out there stating that it's not FDA approved so no sure thing that it even works.
 
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