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Colt saddling difficulty after ill-fitting saddle

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I'm sure most of you know about my colt. But if you don't, here's a little info. He's a two year old (2 1/2 to be technical), green broke Quarter Horse gelding.
Anyway, I'm having some problems with saddling (and even blanketing) him now after an ill-fitting saddle was used on him. The very first time I saddled him (and blanketed him) after getting him, he was totally chill with both. Now, if I approach him with even just the saddle blanket, he backs up, hits the end of the rope (not hard), and freaks out. Not big, just a little fit. His two fronts leave the ground and he just trembles, snorts, and jerks his head. It's worse with the winter blanket.
If you manage to get him saddled, he's completely fine and well-behaved. It's just the problem of getting the saddle on him.
The other day, I did manage by bribing him with some treats.
I tied him very loose, so that if he jerked away it would just come undone but I could still grab him. Then I got my saddle pad and just gently brushed him with it. He trembled and backed away, so I tried again. As soon as he accepted it I gave him a treat. When he knew treats were involved, the situation definitely changed.
The saddle was harder, as it's an extremely heavy roping saddle, so I can't put it on very easily. He was definitely less freaked out now, but still backed away. So I put my bucket on the ground with the few remaining treats in it, and he let me saddle him. After I got it on he was completely fine and is not in the least bit cinchy or anything.
But I am not one that likes to bribe a horse to do something. I expect them to behave without a bribe. How do I fix this?
I will add it was completely my fault in the first place because I assumed my Billy Cook was fitting him fine, since it fit any horse. I know, stupid me and big mistake. After the second time with it on him he showed me he was uncomfortable and did so by bucking and being tense. As soon as I took it off him, those behaviors dissolved. I put it back on without the pad and sure enough, terrible fit. I feel so bad about it.
I found a saddle that does fit him very well, but now I have this problem. How do I fix it? Will he just find that this new saddle doesn't bother him and stop doing this?
Thanks ahead of time and sorry for the lengthy post.
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Huh, I was taught never to feed before or immediately after riding because it will cause colic. I didn't know about that!
Feeding during exercise is not a cause of colic. Horses are meant to have food in their system at all times, even when galloping around. In nature, they graze almost constantly while also are ready to gallop off at any sign of danger. The practice of not feeding racehorses prior to hard exercise is one reason why a huge percentage of them develop ulcers.

If we eat a lot and exercise, it can give us a stomachache. Horses are different.
A study by KER showed that horses that were fed before exercise had a higher blood flow to the digestive tract and also to the skeletal and respiratory muscles than horses that were fasted.
This link has a lot of details about feeding and ulcers:
How to Feed an Ulcer-Prone Horse [12-Step Guide] | Mad Barn
 

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Huh, I was taught never to feed before or immediately after riding because it will cause colic. I didn't know about that!
People who say that are talking about feed, not hay. At least that's my understanding. I always give mine hay before a ride, preferably alfalfa hay, for its slight ulcer-preventing function. Plus I feel like them having something in their stomach helps them focus better. When I ride a hungry Pony, for instance, I can always tell that his mind is on eating and not on me.
 

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The lowly dude horses are in most case, caught, put at the hitch rack or saddling room, fed, brushed and saddled at the same time they are eating. After saddling thousands of horses in this manner. never seen any problems cause by the feeding while brushing/grooming and saddling while be fed. Just saying.
 

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I have one hard rule, never saddle a horse that is tied hard, crossed tied hard. You just never know when a wreck is going to happen by a horse spooking at some thing. Cross ties should be tied with a break a way, lead ropes should be wraped when saddling, not tied hard. Could save many a horse and many a human from injury or death. Same for groom or shoeing/trimming. When vetting. A horse can learn to stand ground tied with out any problem. Just saying.
 
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