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Wondering if anyone has any advice on what to do, if anything, about this little guy's eye. I've already committed to the worst possible scenario that he will be permanently blind and potentially even have to have it removed, but the lot argued with me and told me it was just a scratch and that he would recover (searches for eyeroll emoji). Someone I know also told me that their colt had the exact same injury and they cleared it right up using a topical medication called Amoxi-Mast, which is used for mastitis in cows...????

Thoughts? Pics attached of my pity purchase. His name is Cobalt and he's a good boy.
 

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I would not put anything in a horse's eye unless it was specifically for an equine eye. Even then the type of medication is dependent on the cause. For instance a horse with uveitis will get an antibiotic ointment that contains a steroid to help with inflammation. If you put that same ointment in an eye that has an abrasion it will cause blindness. So your best bet is to call a vet out, have the eye stained to see what is going on and have the proper medication prescribed. And yes if the damage isn't too great they can heal from an eye abrasion.
 

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Can't offer advice on eye injury - thankfully we've not had any yet.


He is a cute boy though and I hope its not the worst case scenario.


However, if it is, I'm reasonably sure he can and will learn to have a normal life with only one eye.



Hoping for the best! Keep us updated on him!
 

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Any eye injury = immediate vet call for me. I have had a mare who had a really bad corneal abrasion and we treated it successfully. They installed a line that ran through her eye lid along the mane and had a port for injecting the medications into the line. Much easier and safer for everyone than trying to put the ointment in via drops or from the medicine tube. It was time intensive, but the mare is worth the world to me, so we did it. Here's an article about it: https://www.vet.k-state.edu/vhc/services/equine/timely-topics/abscess.html
 

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Dreama - rescue from the local dog pound. Some type of gaited horse mix of unknown history.
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No additional advice other than what others have already mentioned, calling in a vet. Just wanted to offer a word of encouragement. My aunt has a mare who was blinded by an accident that happened before my aunt owned her. She already had a very calm demeanor though and after the eye healed and she adjusted to the loss of vision she was still very calm. She spooks a lot less than some of the other horses do. Sometimes she wants to turn or tilt her head to see what is happening, which gives her a "puppy dog" sort of look, but other than that she is fine. So, should it not clear up, with good handling he still has potential to grow into an excellent horse. Especially since he is young and could grow into being accustomed to the vision loss. Hopefully that doesn't happen, but he could still be a good match for you. :)
 

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That's a toughy. I would get a very trusted vet out to look at him (which i'm sure you have done). It almost looks like moon blindness, but dont take that to heart. Pictures are much different than seeing it in person. I hope you find the right solution for him. He's adorable, btw!! Wishing you the best of luck.
 

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That looks like an ulcer scar. If he is not blinking and squnting(signs of pain), then it is probably healed. I would get the vets opinion.
 

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That was an ulcer that is now healed. If it wasn't his eye would be tearing wouldn't be keeping eye open. That is just a scar.

Doesn't hurt to have it checked, doubt it it's moon blindness. Again it would be painful would be squinting it and it would be tearing.
 
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