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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all! Looking for opinions on this mare's conformation and if she could hold up to some mid-level jumping. Or, if not jumping, what other jobs she could do decently well at without falling apart. She's been 'retired' for a few years but I have a young, adventurous rider looking for something to have fun on.
 

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My thought looking at her would not be jumping. Of course horses can surprise you by being mentally athletic and overcoming their physical challenges. But she is very steep, both shoulder and hindquarters, and has a long back and weak loin. I'd suspect she'd have a lot of difficulty getting her hind end underneath herself and even lower jumps would probably be a rough ride. I'm sure a young rider could walk, trot and canter around on her if she is sound, and do trails. A well fitting saddle might be tricky since she has low withers, a forward girth groove, and an upward slope to her back. From the photo a person can't tell if her barrel is flat sided or round; if it is flatter that would make things easier.
 

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she can DO jumping, but she won't be all that good at it. Her hind end; hip, basically, is short and upright. Her gaskins are a bit thin/weak. Her shoulder and elbow angle look fine to me, but notice how she is standing OVER her front legs I think she may be heavy on the forehand. But, if she has that heart of gold, none of that would matter. But I see no real weaknesses that say "don't jump me"
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
A well fitting saddle might be tricky since she has low withers, a forward girth groove, and an upward slope to her back. From the photo a person can't tell if her barrel is flat sided or round; if it is flatter that would make things easier.
Ohh thank you for that flashback. She's almost as round as a barrel and went in a treeless saddle for months before the fitter found a no-name GP saddle that fit(/s her when she's in shape).
She's sound as a rock and a very sweet, solid trail horse, but you're echoing my thoughts on her athletic potential. I was hoping I'd missed something. Unfortunately said kid is looking to get to some local shows or something and will probably lose interest with just trail riding pretty quick.

But I see no real weaknesses that say "don't jump me"
That's at least a little encouraging. If it wouldn't hurt I guess I can throw some x-rails at her and just see how she does. :ROFLMAO:

Edit: The other option with a local scene would be barrel racing, I guess. Anyone with thoughts on that?
 

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Her will can compensate for her build or restrictions her build may enhance..
Train-wrecks of built animals have proved many wrong...
But....
If she is "retired" why would you put her back to being made to do such strenuous now I don't understand.
She would benefit from some activity and the extra attention she would be given by a youth who loves to ride...
But I see no point in taxing her physically if she has been pasture happy and sound, give her a job to do where she can remain pasture happy and stay sound not come up sore or worse.
Just my thought on it.
🐴...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Her will can compensate for her build or restrictions her build may enhance..
Train-wrecks of built animals have proved many wrong...
But....
If she is "retired" why would you put her back to being made to do such strenuous now I don't understand.
She would benefit from some activity and the extra attention she would be given by a youth who loves to ride...
But I see no point in taxing her physically if she has been pasture happy and sound, give her a job to do where she can remain pasture happy and stay sound not come up sore or worse.
Just my thought on it.
🐴...
Probably should have clarified, she's barely 10! She may not look like much but she's been completely functionally sound. She was a horse in her early years. But she hasn't ridden in 4+ years. Unfortunately the one thing she doesn't do is trail out alone, and I have two other horses to deal with. She's just been kinda sitting there for years now.

So really, I was hoping she would be able to hold up to the stuff this kid wants to do so she could have a job (and attention) - for at least a few years before the family can afford a horse of their own. I've definitely seen some horses that folks look at and immediately say 'no jumping ever', and I know next to nothing about it so I wanted to get some opinions. That said, I'm pretty sure said kid could be convinced into any dicipiline as long as long as they can show (low level local stuff). So while I know they're taking jumping lessons, things like barrel racing are kinda also on the table.
 

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I am assuming her future rider has an interest in showing. Any horse can jump small obstacles. If showing is the goal, maybe researching what the local shows offer for classes to compete in will help. I have seen rails on the ground set in a "jump" course that is taken at a canter (not jumping, just rating the rails and smoothly executing the pattern) to several levels of "green hunter/jumper fences going from 18" and up. So it depends on the ambition of the rider if they will be satisfied if she can't jump very high. Myself, I have great fun jumping no higher than 24". I work toward form and rhythm rather than height, for my own pleasure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would add that there is a lot more to jumping training than running a horse at some cross rails:)
I'm sure there is! I've got a few weeks of conditioning ahead so lots of time to research. And thanks, I didn't realize how many options there are for show classes, hopefully some exist locally and will be "enough" for the little show off. (kid, not horse) 😁
 

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I have to agree with Tinyliny, I am personally not fond of a horse that leans over their front legs as it does tend to mean heavy on the fore.

With everything else said and with her slightly mix-matched proportions, I feel she'd have a hard time getting over higher jumps and lifting and balancing herself. From the picture, her croup is a little higher than her wither, which sometimes indicates downhill riding.
But if the buyer loves her- that's what really matters~
 
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