The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 212 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about going out to take a look at this one. These pics were sent by the owner, so may not be ideal for judging conformation, but hoping some more knowledgeable people can tell me what they see. She's 18, been shown up to Training level 3 and extensively trail ridden. Was also ridden by a 7 yr old so advertised as super safe and completely sound. The asking price is fantastic and she's not too far that I can't drive to see her. I'm looking for something for lower level dressage and pleasure. Thoughts?







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,738 Posts
She's gorgeous!! I have a soft spot for "older" mares, so I love her!

I don't have any personal experience with Friesians, but, from being on this forum for a long time, I've always heard that they do not make ideal dressage mounts. I've always heard that they are popular for dressage due to their flashy movement, but that it's not easy to get them to do correct dressage.
They were originally bred to be light draft carriage horses, and that doesn't always translate well undersaddle.

My main concern is that you will end up running into many of the same problems you're having with Sydney.
With this mare's age, it's only going to get harder for her to move "correctly." Also, at her age, selling her on -if she ended up not working out- is going to get harder and harder every year.

My first horse that I owned was sold to me as being 21 - turned out she was 24. I owned her for 5 years before she passed away at the age of 29. She was the best thing. I had lots of extravagant plans of things the two of us were going to do...but she ended up not being up for most of them. It was ok though - she taught me a lot more about who I am, who I should be, how to enjoy life, etc, than I probably ever would have learned if all my competitive goals had worked out.
I'm definitely pro-older horses, but they have a shorter "let's do all these activities and then let's go to ten shows!" tolerance than a young horse might. You kind of have to go at their pace and understand that competition may or may not be in the cards.
Are you ok with having a big pet/trail ride horse in a couple years, for longer than you had a dressage horse?


I'm all for older/senior horses and I feel like everyone should own at least one of them. When you're new to the ownership gambit, it's sure nice to have an experienced horse that doesn't get overly worried about details!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
She's gorgeous!! I have a soft spot for "older" mares, so I love her!

I don't have any personal experience with Friesians, but, from being on this forum for a long time, I've always heard that they do not make ideal dressage mounts. I've always heard that they are popular for dressage due to their flashy movement, but that it's not easy to get them to do correct dressage.
They were originally bred to be light draft carriage horses, and that doesn't always translate well undersaddle.

My main concern is that you will end up running into many of the same problems you're having with Sydney.
With this mare's age, it's only going to get harder for her to move "correctly." Also, at her age, selling her on -if she ended up not working out- is going to get harder and harder every year.

My first horse that I owned was sold to me as being 21 - turned out she was 24. I owned her for 5 years before she passed away at the age of 29. She was the best thing. I had lots of extravagant plans of things the two of us were going to do...but she ended up not being up for most of them. It was ok though - she taught me a lot more about who I am, who I should be, how to enjoy life, etc, than I probably ever would have learned if all my competitive goals had worked out.
I'm definitely pro-older horses, but they have a shorter "let's do all these activities and then let's go to ten shows!" tolerance than a young horse might. You kind of have to go at their pace and understand that competition may or may not be in the cards.
Are you ok with having a big pet/trail ride horse in a couple years, for longer than you had a dressage horse?


I'm all for older/senior horses and I feel like everyone should own at least one of them. When you're new to the ownership gambit, it's sure nice to have an experienced horse that doesn't get overly worried about details!
Lol, I feel like you read my mind! All the same thoughts I've had. At the same time, I think about several horses at my barn who are in their mid to upper 20s, still riding several days a week with minimal maintenance. I would, of course, have a PPE done with my vet. I haven't even done my first show yet, and at my age and being brand spanking new to dressage, I can't see myself every being a serious competitor. I think if I could get a safe horse to take me up to 1st level, I would be happy.

I've heard the same thing about friesians as far as being competitive in dressage as well. I can't help it, I love the breed! Lol. If I was intending to go upper levels, then this would likely not be an option for me. I think my trainer would be better than me at assessing her ability so I forwarded the short video clip I got.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,786 Posts
Good thoughts by Wallaby. I think she's worth taking a look at. Honestly, though (and recognizing that the pics tell little), I would not consider her as a serious contender for competitive dressage but if you are indeed serious about pleasure riding and the occasional low level dressage show she could well be perfect for you. Let us know how it works out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Just heard back from my trainer. She thinks the mare is lovely, but is worried about her age and if I would be able to continue going up in the levels with her. She sees me competing at 2nd level in a couple years and the mare would be 20 by then. Her owner swears she's NEVER had a health issue in the 5 years she's had her and is in great health. Personally, I don't think I'll ever be a serious competitor and would be happy just continuing to learn and enjoy riding. I'm only learning Intro right now and still trying to maneuver a decent 20m circle, lol. Thoughts on competing on a horse this age?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
Another thing to keep in mind is that Friesians are a whole new ball game movement-wise. Whilst a good rider should be able to ride anything, Friesians really are in a world of their own, or so I've found. Of all the different horses I've ridden, Friesians are without a doubt the strangest and, dare I say, most uncomfortable. Their movement is so exaggerated (or is in the case of the one I rode) that it's very difficult to get used to.

She's a very pretty mare, though. I would consider her as a pleasure mount, but not sure about as a dressage mount :/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Another thing to keep in mind is that Friesians are a whole new ball game movement-wise. Whilst a good rider should be able to ride anything, Friesians really are in a world of their own, or so I've found. Of all the different horses I've ridden, Friesians are without a doubt the strangest and, dare I say, most uncomfortable. Their movement is so exaggerated (or is in the case of the one I rode) that it's very difficult to get used to.

She's a very pretty mare, though. I would consider her as a pleasure mount, but not sure about as a dressage mount :/
I've heard this as well, both arguments. People seem to either love em or hate em. Natasha Althoff is a Grand Prix rider I follow on Youtube and her main GP horse is a friesian, but doesn't seem to have the exaggerated movement either. I've never ridden one, but I can't wait to try it out! Because of scheduling conflicts, we are shooting for the weekend following Thanksgiving. She's a few hours from me and we both have the next couple weekends tied up. I am going to do my best and go into this with my head and not my heart. If she is not a fit, then I will move on.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tracer

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,978 Posts
Another thing to keep in mind is that Friesians are a whole new ball game movement-wise. Whilst a good rider should be able to ride anything, Friesians really are in a world of their own, or so I've found. Of all the different horses I've ridden, Friesians are without a doubt the strangest and, dare I say, most uncomfortable. Their movement is so exaggerated (or is in the case of the one I rode) that it's very difficult to get used to.

She's a very pretty mare, though. I would consider her as a pleasure mount, but not sure about as a dressage mount :/
I've heard this as well, both arguments. People seem to either love em or hate em. Natasha Althoff is a Grand Prix rider I follow on Youtube and her main GP horse is a friesian, but doesn't seem to have the exaggerated movement either. I've never ridden one, but I can't wait to try it out! Because of scheduling conflicts, we are shooting for the weekend following Thanksgiving. She's a few hours from me and we both have the next couple weekends tied up. I am going to do my best and go into this with my head and not my heart. If she is not a fit, then I will move on.
Unrelated but I love Natasha Altoff <3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,269 Posts
I will say I had an arabian mare that I got as a teenager. The mare was 19 when I got her and I rode her through high school. I free leased her to a family friend after I graduated, the family friend was looking for a kind old school master to teach young students on. She loved to jump, had a bit of arthritis but we managed with an oral cosequin. She slowed down at around 29 and passed away at 30. The day she died, she had been groomed by a young girl, ridden walk and trot, went over a few (small) cross rails, had been bathed and cooled out and brushed again. Than that evening she collapsed during feeding and died in the barn owners arms. Don't discount her for age. In addition, one of the feistiest horses I ever rode as a 27 year old wrangle horse who lived ( I mean LIVED) to chase other horses on the morning wrangle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I will say I had an arabian mare that I got as a teenager. The mare was 19 when I got her and I rode her through high school. I free leased her to a family friend after I graduated, the family friend was looking for a kind old school master to teach young students on. She loved to jump, had a bit of arthritis but we managed with an oral cosequin. She slowed down at around 29 and passed away at 30. The day she died, she had been groomed by a young girl, ridden walk and trot, went over a few (small) cross rails, had been bathed and cooled out and brushed again. Than that evening she collapsed during feeding and died in the barn owners arms. Don't discount her for age. In addition, one of the feistiest horses I ever rode as a 27 year old wrangle horse who lived ( I mean LIVED) to chase other horses on the morning wrangle.
Thank you. This made me smile. I've been weighing this and have had a lot of back of forth with the owner and here is what I've come to. I'm 39 and just began dressage in May. Most importantly, I need a horse that is both safe and sound. Ideally, I would LOVE to have a younger dressage schoolmaster trained to 2nd or 3rd level, but unfortunately, my budget says it ain't gonna happen. Not unless they have some health maintenance issues. I have A LOT to learn still, and if I can do that on a horse that I love and enjoy, then I will be a happy camper. I figure that if I am ever ready to move up in the levels, then she will have been a great teacher to help me build the confidence, skill, and experience needed to take on a younger horse that may need some work and not cost me an arm and a leg. If I get 10 good years on this mare, then the investment of $6k asking price would definitely be worth it for me.

Oh, and this may sound silly, but I almost feel like she is meant for me.. She will be turning 18 in February. My birthday is February 18th! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Since you've never ridden a friesian before, I'd recommend you do that first and see how you like it. I think she looks great, my only worry would be her age like you said. Be prepared for emergency vet funds!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
35,835 Posts
If she's close then go and see her
As a breed they aren't everyone's 'cup of tea' to ride but you might like her
I've had horses and ponies stay fit and healthy well beyond 20 but I've had as many others that haven't so I wouldn't pay a high price for her, insurance cover gets difficult once they get beyond 15/16 years
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,285 Posts
What are her test scores? For 6k those scores better be golden. And only training level? 6k for training level?

Seems to me they are selling the breed of the horse vs selling the horse's ability.

You seem to have caught the dressage bug! You will want to train and compete higher, believe me. Even if just local shows. Been there and wore out that shirt! Buy a horse that can climb with you. If you think this mare is that horse, great. But think long and hard about it.

I bought a crazy $600 Arab, and we are training third, testing lower second an doing pretty dang good.

He also does LD (want to do a 50 or two next year) and just started working cows. He loves to track a cow. Not pretty doing it, but he is game!

My point is, you can get a lot of horse, and do many things without the price tag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,324 Posts
I think that you really need to think about what you want. I personally think that this is a nice mare. 18 is not that bad and yes she can compete at 20. If you are looking to move up quite a bit than this mare probably isn't for you. Not saying that she can't learn new stuff but if you surpass her, you will probably be giving her away in a couple of years. If you are happy to learn how to ride and just enjoy your horse then maybe she's the one. I personally think that there is a little bit of prejudice that goes on over this breed and I also think people will say things about this breed just because that is what they heard. I have a half friesian and she just floats and I love riding this horse. Friesians were originally bred for riding horses and then went on to be bred for carriage horses and are now being bred to be riding horses again. If I were you and I thought that I would like this horse I would go try her out and see for myself. The only thing I would hesitate with would be 6 grand for an 18 yr. old horse. I was given an 18 yr.old retired show horse. Not that it mattered because I don't ride saddle seat but she is still highly trained. If were me I would probably go into it knowing that I am going to keep her for as long as she lives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
What are her test scores? For 6k those scores better be golden. And only training level? 6k for training level?

Seems to me they are selling the breed of the horse vs selling the horse's ability.

You seem to have caught the dressage bug! You will want to train and compete higher, believe me. Even if just local shows. Been there and wore out that shirt! Buy a horse that can climb with you. If you think this mare is that horse, great. But think long and hard about it.

I bought a crazy $600 Arab, and we are training third, testing lower second an doing pretty dang good.

He also does LD (want to do a 50 or two next year) and just started working cows. He loves to track a cow. Not pretty doing it, but he is game!

My point is, you can get a lot of horse, and do many things without the price tag.
There's a woman 15 min from me selling another friesian mare for $12K and she's 14 and still green as can be. Her friend and I got into an argument about the asking price and I said what you are saying, that she's selling on breed alone. It's been listed for almost a year with no takers. But yes, Friesians are a higher priced breed.

You bought a "crazy" Arab for $600. That's a good price. I don't want a crazy horse, and am not a fan of arabs, though I've seen some nice crosses. As a green rider, I don't have the skill to take a young, crazy horse and make it great. Yes, I love dressage, but not for the ribbons or showing. I love the technique and communication between horse and rider. It fascinates me, but the show scene is not a big deal for me. I also prefer a larger bodied horse - Friesian, Warmblood, Andalusian. I'm 5'8 and don't like feeling like an amazon woman on my horse. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I think that you really need to think about what you want. I personally think that this is a nice mare. 18 is not that bad and yes she can compete at 20. If you are looking to move up quite a bit than this mare probably isn't for you. Not saying that she can't learn new stuff but if you surpass her, you will probably be giving her away in a couple of years. If you are happy to learn how to ride and just enjoy your horse then maybe she's the one. I personally think that there is a little bit of prejudice that goes on over this breed and I also think people will say things about this breed just because that is what they heard. I have a half friesian and she just floats and I love riding this horse. Friesians were originally bred for riding horses and then went on to be bred for carriage horses and are now being bred to be riding horses again. If I were you and I thought that I would like this horse I would go try her out and see for myself. The only thing I would hesitate with would be 6 grand for an 18 yr. old horse. I was given an 18 yr.old retired show horse. Not that it mattered because I don't ride saddle seat but she is still highly trained. If were me I would probably go into it knowing that I am going to keep her for as long as she lives.
That is my idea. I'm not a competitor and feel like I've gotten started way too late in the game at my age to be one. I just want something I can enjoy and learn on. We haven't really discussed the price yet, because I'd like to see and ride her first, but the vibes I get is that the owner is more concerned about finding her the perfect home. When/if the time comes, I will see how negotiable she is on price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,285 Posts
I didn't think he was all that crazy. His previous owner did hence his price. He was halter broke and had a lot of forward.

The point is that there some good horses you can grow with. And I never thought of showing, I started taking dressage lessons after I realized the old body of mine, after being out of horses for 16 years, needed some limbering up while training the Arab.

Then the bug bit. I'm not a dressage diva, but seeing our scores getting higher, his movements crisper, our communication cleaner, well, the showing was nice. I only competed with my previous scores.

I'm your height and if you look at my avatar I don't think I look like an Amazon.

The point of my earlier post was she is a lot of money. And a different horse may give you the ability to dabble in different disciplines as you grow as a rider.

I also said earlier, if she is exactly what you want then great!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
Personally I would pass. I think she is quite green for being 18. Not that you can really tell that much from the video but enough. If it were me I'd save my money and wait for something younger and better to come along.

To me I'd focus on finding just a good horse. I wouldn't be focused on flashy movement or super fancy but on something with good ridability/training and decent athleticism/capability. If you're a greener rider, you don't want the big-flashy movement. It takes a lot more to organize/ride than a smaller, less dramatic mover. I'm not saying don't find a nice mover but focus on the training/ridability first. Find a horse you can learn on and enjoy riding each and everyday. You can find a well trained, ridable and athletic horse who may not be super fancy but be perfect for you.
 
1 - 20 of 212 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top