The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,490 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've heard so much about gaited horses.....I've heard they can't trot, I've heard their back feet shuffle in the trot, I recently bought a book on gaited horses called Easy-Gaited Horses because I was so confused, and it said a gaited horse is any horse who can perform an Easy Gait. It listed the Flat-Footed or Flat Walk/Paso Llano, the Running Walk, the Pace, the Amble or Broken/Stepping Pace, the Saddle Rack/Singlefoot/Corto/Slow Tolt, and the Rack/Fast Tolt/Largo.

It also says about the Trot, "It is the only intermediate gait of non-gaited horses and may be used in addition to one of the easy gaits by some gaited horses."

I have a gaited Paso Fino, but I don't know why he's classified as gaited. he can walk, I'm pretty positive he can trot/jog, and it's really smooth--I ride it bareback and it's smoother than his walk--, and he can canter/lope. He also used to know the Fino; my mom used to cue him into it by separating the reins and holding them in two hands so he drops his head to his chest, clucking, and cueing his side with her boot just above her heel. Is this why he's classified as gaited?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,624 Posts
I always think of a gaited horse as being like a car with overdrive. All horses can do the normal 4 gaits ie walk, trot, canter, gallop. Gaited horses have an extra one that like overdrive on a car, smooths out the engine and saves on fuel (thinking your butt is the fuel :lol: )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,082 Posts
I've heard so much about gaited horses.....I've heard they can't trot, I've heard their back feet shuffle in the trot, I recently bought a book on gaited horses called Easy-Gaited Horses because I was so confused, and it said a gaited horse is any horse who can perform an Easy Gait. It listed the Flat-Footed or Flat Walk/Paso Llano, the Running Walk, the Pace, the Amble or Broken/Stepping Pace, the Saddle Rack/Singlefoot/Corto/Slow Tolt, and the Rack/Fast Tolt/Largo.

It also says about the Trot, "It is the only intermediate gait of non-gaited horses and may be used in addition to one of the easy gaits by some gaited horses."

I have a gaited Paso Fino, but I don't know why he's classified as gaited. he can walk, I'm pretty positive he can trot/jog, and it's really smooth--I ride it bareback and it's smoother than his walk--, and he can canter/lope. He also used to know the Fino; my mom used to cue him into it by separating the reins and holding them in two hands so he drops his head to his chest, clucking, and cueing his side with her boot just above her heel. Is this why he's classified as gaited?
If they are not collected properly they can trot. Alot of it depends on the individaul horse. I have 1 that gaits pretty much all the time. Sometimes when loose and he is running around like something scared him he trots. There are some gaited horses that just cannot gait although that is not the norm.
Gaiting is a four beat gait. I listen for the pucka pucka because some of mine have a smooth trot and it can be hard to tell, escpecially when I 1st rode gaited. Your paso is classified as gaited because that is a gaited breed and should gait. A qtr hs will never gait so they are not classified as gaited.
A gaited horses back bone is usually ends behind the hip bone while trottinh horses back bone uasually ends in front of hip bone. Too far back and they become pacey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,490 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I usually ask him for the trot and he'll do it. It's really smooth though. I can post to it, but I sit it because it's so comfortable. So in Trail and Pleasure classes where your horse is asked to trot/jog, would my Paso be marked down if he couldn't execute a "normal" trot? Can gaited horses trot normally, or is their hoof placement different?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,624 Posts
Next question...Why would you want a gaited horse to trot? You can trot a gait out of a gaited horse sort of. The trot is much easier for the horse so if its allowed to do it, eventually it will "lose" its gait or more simply, get out of the habit.
If you want to show in a non-gaited arena get a non-gaited horse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,490 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I've just never really thought much of owning a gaited horse versus a non-gaited horse. My mom says she basically ruined his Fino 15 years ago by never making him do it, and I'm trying to make him remember it. He's doing well :). I'll remember not to trot him....So I'd just go from the walk to the canter? That seems like a fairly big step unless you're supposed to go walk-lope-canter....Another question: He doesn't gallop. Is this just because he's 21 years old and feels he's too old to gallop (He's in great shape) or because there's something about gaited horses or Paso's not being able to gallop? That seems pretty unlikely....or was he just trained in a manner that prohibited him from galloping?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,577 Posts
Next question...Why would you want a gaited horse to trot? You can trot a gait out of a gaited horse sort of. The trot is much easier for the horse so if its allowed to do it, eventually it will "lose" its gait or more simply, get out of the habit.
If you want to show in a non-gaited arena get a non-gaited horse.
Thank you. Trotting a gaited horse is my pet peeve. If you want a trot, GET A HORSE THAT TROTS. You just don't go and trot a horse specifically BRED to NOT trot.

(and no, I'm not trying to sound snarky, did that sound snarky? Sorry! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,577 Posts
I'll remember not to trot him....So I'd just go from the walk to the canter? That seems like a fairly big step unless you're supposed to go walk-lope-canter....Another question: He doesn't gallop. Is this just because he's 21 years old and feels he's too old to gallop (He's in great shape) or because there's something about gaited horses or Paso's not being able to gallop? That seems pretty unlikely....or was he just trained in a manner that prohibited him from galloping?
No. You work on gaiting. You don't just completely ignore a gait, you WORK on it. It's not going to be cured overnight.

Some gaited horses refused to canter/gallop. I think it may be because they just don't know they can! Just use your "go" cues and work on it. It won't happen overnight :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,490 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
No. You work on gaiting. You don't just completely ignore a gait, you WORK on it. It's not going to be cured overnight.

Some gaited horses refused to canter/gallop. I think it may be because they just don't know they can! Just use your "go" cues and work on it. It won't happen overnight :wink:
thanks! I'm still trying to understand all the mechanics of gaited horses lol. I just learned they we're supposed to trot....so for all gaited horses, between the walk and the canter is the gait they're gaited in? (btw, you didn't sound snarky lol.) So gaited horses are bred to do a different gait in place of the trot....sometimes I can't tell if I'm doing the fino or if I'm trotting. I'll try to get some videos up here--I have some but haven't uploaded them to my computer yet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Yes, generally speaking a gaited horse's gait is what you would find between the walk and the canter. Mind you, gaited horses can have more than one intermediate gait, or "gears", so the tricky part is knowing what they are actually doing and how to ask them to do it. If possible, it would be a good idea to find an experienced gaited rider - preferably one familiar with your breed's preferred gaits - that would be willing to work with you every now and then until you get it all sorted out. I did a quick google search on Paso Finos in Ohio and there seemed to be plenty of farms and breeders in your state. Do a little asking around and you could probably find someone to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Thank you. Trotting a gaited horse is my pet peeve. If you want a trot, GET A HORSE THAT TROTS. You just don't go and trot a horse specifically BRED to NOT trot.

(and no, I'm not trying to sound snarky, did that sound snarky? Sorry! :)
sorry, I had to react :) I am not any camel-breeder, but I am sure there some "types" of camels-somtehing like breeds. (but not having stud books, of course :) ) What I wanted to say was that camels (with the one 'hill' surely, with two-I dunno) can walk, trot, gait and canter. If they can, why can'T some horses w/t/g/c also?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,577 Posts
Horses aren't camels... I'm not entirely sure what you're asking? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,577 Posts
I just learned they we're supposed to trot....so for all gaited horses, between the walk and the canter is the gait they're gaited in? (btw, you didn't sound snarky lol.) So gaited horses are bred to do a different gait in place of the trot....sometimes I can't tell if I'm doing the fino or if I'm trotting. I'll try to get some videos up here--I have some but haven't uploaded them to my computer yet
Like GaitedGuy said, they have many little speeds between the walk and canter. There's a flat walk, regular walk, and a gait (you will probably know when you feel it. It is consistent and smoothe.). Flat walk is just a fast walk that can outwalk any QH. Yet slower than a gait. Feels just like a walk - but faster.

Gaited horses (except 'Breds and Iceys) are bred to NOT trot. At all. But some have.. "Problems".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,490 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Like GaitedGuy said, they have many little speeds between the walk and canter. There's a flat walk, regular walk, and a gait (you will probably know when you feel it. It is consistent and smoothe.). Flat walk is just a fast walk that can outwalk any QH. Yet slower than a gait. Feels just like a walk - but faster.

Gaited horses (except 'Breds and Iceys) are bred to NOT trot. At all. But some have.. "Problems".
I read somewhere that you should make gaited horses trot to improve their coordination.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,577 Posts
Yes, but only on the GROUND. OMHO, It's simply too risky undersaddle..

You an do whatever you want, but I'm just going to warn you :) Can't say you weren't warned!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,624 Posts
I read somewhere that you should make gaited horses trot to improve their coordination.....
There are some schools of thought that a horse should be worked through its "thread" of gaits for conditioning and training. My husband is one of them :lol:
I prefer to keep my gaited horse in gait. I did do the "lets work through all the paces" for my first year with a gaited horse. Then it started to become harder and harder to draw her up into her gait. I went back to my old way of keeping her in gait. I do walk, canter and gallop her just not trot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,245 Posts
MOST gaited horses don't trot at all unless they're ridden by someone who doesn't know much about gaited horses. It's seen as nothing more than a bad habit within MOST gaited breeds.

Some gaited breeds, like Saddlebreds, are always taught how to trot and gait. Some people who only trail ride their gaited horses teach them to trot and gait. But most people wouldn't even consider it because it can cause the horse to lose their gait (since trotting is much easier for them to do).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,490 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Also, I was watching a video of me riding bareback at different gaits. What I'd thought to be a trot all this time was really a very comfortable lateral gait. It was too comfortable to be a pace, but maybe it was an amble/stepping pace? I'll try to post the video to make sure, but it seems my gelding can't trot after all :).

If I were to enter a trail class at the fair, at times when you're supposed to trot, could I do this lateral gait instead? Obviously not in a pleasure class, but in trail, showmanship, or halter could I?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,624 Posts
I'm not sure which one it is, the pace I think, but it can feel very "trotty" I can see how it can sorta kinda feel like a smoother trot.
I always say "shes getting pacey" when Vida does it
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top