The Horse Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been dealing with this problem with my gelding on and off for a while. He will just randomly decide not to finish his meals. He did this a few months ago and after a few adjustments he went back to normal. He also did this when he was boarded at other barns.
At first I thought it was his teeth, now I’m thinking maybe ulcers? (His teeth were just done in sept.) I have really never dealt with ulcers personally, but He was boarded for 7 years and I kind of believe that some of this care could be a cause of ulcers. They would get hay 3x daily (2 flakes am+pm and 1 flake afternoon) and would be fed about 6 qts of feed am and pm. Many barns only did a few hours of turnout as well and were pretty high commotion barns.
He has always been so irritable. One second he’s happy as a clam then the next he pins his ears and wants nothing to do with you, he’s also SUPER anxious. He’s an absolute angel under saddle but in the barn/turnout he’s always worried about the other horses and what they are doing and will spend most of his time hovering over them. He doesn’t really get mad when I touch his stomach but he is girthy.

He now gets all day turnout, free choice grass hay (as well as a flake of alfalfa per day) and he gets smaller, more frequent meals.
a lot of people kind of just shrug it off like “eh he’s probably just an angry horse” and while I know he’s not a bundle of sunshine it just seems strange to me how happy and loving he can be and then suddenly he hates everyone.
He is healthy otherwise. Is UTD on everything. He has struggled with Lyme in the past and was just retreated for it this summer. It messed with his mood A LOT but I just am not convinced this is Lyme again because he doesn’t have any other symptoms. Does this sound like it could be ulcers? I may just be being a crazy paranoid horse mom whose grasping at straws here.

I’ve also read sooo many different opinions on treating ulcers. A lot of people seem to treat them themselves. I am having a vet out soon and can ask about it then, but if this is something that isn’t going to harm him and I could start asap could I start treating him myself?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,597 Posts
1. How GREAT that you are not willing to accept that “he’s just an angry horse” BS(y)(y)

2. Your horse has been through quite a bit of change from barn-to-barn. Some horses seem to roll with that a lot better than others.

3. I have always half joked the horse on the right side of my avatar is A.D.D. He has always been an anxious and nervous horse. A Jekyll-Hyde to where I would catch fleeting glimpses of how sweet he could be, if only I could figure out what was wrong.

Rusty has been with me 24 of his 26 years. It took me until he was 13 yrs, and then by accident, to figure out some of his problem.

He is grain and soy intolerant for starters. I initially put him on a grain-free ration balancer that uses alfalfa as the protein source instead of soy. It made a huge difference in his personality to the good.

He is an easy keeper and has now been on a condensed vit/min supplement from HorseTech that has zero added iron and is soy-free:)

3.1. The second and very major breakthrough was putting him on MagRestore, which is magnesium malate.

Don’t bother with Remission or anything that uses magnesium oxide. MagRestore is all that worked on my Rusty.


I used this product for three years and then one day I just didn’t need it anymore. Somehow the magnesium shortage the tests showed Rusty did NOT have, righted themselves:):)

4. I would not be surprised at the ulcer issue but it may be more hind gut acidosi. “Succeed” worked great on one of my horses for hind gut acidosis but didn’t help another horse.

What works on that horse (the Horse on the left in my avatar) is Egusin.


This horse is insulin resistant, Cushings, has foundered and is 25 years old. Egusin is a 2-phase product that has worked better on him than any prescription product.

I have actually started to use it when I de-worm both horses. I only need to worm them twice yearly. I start the Egusin about ten days ahead of when I want to give them the meds and then give them each the balance if the 21 day treatment of either the SLH or the 250.

**
I hope these options help you in finding the peaceful path your horse is capable of walking:). Had the wrong person got hold of my Rusty all those years ago, his bad attitude and unwillingness would have either got the spirit beat out of him and/or a trip on the slaughter truck to Mexic.

i knew there was a great horse in there somewhere as it was never his nature to rear, buck or bite.

I hope you get things figure out:)
 
  • Like
Reactions: gottatrot

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,015 Posts
When my guy had ulcers, his major symptom was that he would suddenly stop eating his meal. It took me a while to realize that these moment where he would stop eating were actually little colic episodes.

I treated him with Nexium (human ulcer OTC meds) for a month. Symptoms immediately went away once I started, but I couldn't wean him off without them coming back. Did that for 2 months total, then had my vet prescribe GastroGuard. Did that for a month and no recurrence since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,717 Posts
It very well could be ulcers. I would consult with your vet. GastroGuard is the standard of care but it's very expensive (about $700 for a month of treatment ... and you need to do at least a month)

My vet offers a compounded omeprazole that is about half the cost of GastroGuard. Your vet may have something similar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,463 Posts
I would think any horse with a history of stress along with 6 quarts of hard feed at a time could be suspected of having ulcers.
It sounds like his current lifestyle is much better. If you are still feeding grain I would eliminate that and replace it with something roughage based such as beet pulp or hay pellets.

My experience has been that not every horse will heal their ulcers just with a lifestyle and feed change. Some still have low grade ulcers that flare up until being treated with medication. This is especially true if you are working the horse.

One guideline especially for an ulcer prone horse is to feed hay while tacking up to make sure they are never worked on an empty stomach.

My vet also offered compounded omeprazole for $60 full treatment. It has always worked in my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the replies! I will definitely be talking to my vet. I’m also going to try and find a nutritionist to talk to around here. He’s on tribute kalm n eazy right now as well as a hay extender. Recently I have been toying with the idea of switching him to solely hay pellets but I have been weary as he’s always been a hard keeper, but maybe it’s because the diets he’d been on just weren’t working for him. I’m always so paranoid about his weight as there have been times while boarding him that he has looked horrid. Right now I think he’s looking okay and he’a getting less hard feed than he used to. I know people have been very successful with switching to just forage based though so maybe that could be the key for him. If I can find a nutritionist I’ll speak to them about it. I’m just not quite sure how to make the switch.
the first picture is of him last summer still boarded, the 2nd is of him last week at home.
1105161
1105162
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,597 Posts
He looks a lot better since you got him home -- a LOT better!(y)(y)
 
  • Like
Reactions: ACinATX

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,312 Posts
It certainly wouldn't hurt to treat him for ulcers. Also, for ulcer prevention, marshmallow root or aloe juice added to their feed can help. :)
I do that with my mare, as she has had ulcers in the past (from lack of forage unfortunately at past barns). She hasn't had ulcers since! Prevention is key.

It also wouldn't hurt to do another Lyme test. Hay pellets are really good for them too though & can help boost weight - I feed my mare timothy hay pellets & Renew gold, along with her vitamins/supplements. :) He looks pretty good though!!

AND I second that - good for you for not putting up with people saying he's an 'angry horse'. Those types of people irk my soul. When my mare had ulcers, they said she was just being a mare, and when she had Lyme, they said it was 'just the weather' LOL.

There's ALWAYS a reason & you are a good horse parent to try to figure out that reason! :D
 

·
Registered
Just Dream Chasin (Andy) - 2014 sorrel AQHA gelding
Joined
·
18 Posts
It could definitely be ulcers. It sounds like he's had a lot of changes in his diet and routine, which can put a lot of stress on their sensitive lil stomachs :cry:. There are a few "home remedies" for ulcers, but truthfully, I have no idea how effective they are. I think the best bet is to talk to your vet. I hope your horse gets better soon!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top