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So I have been in the horse business for well over 15 years, working here and there with friends horses and getting the horse (and owner on occasion) where they need to be. I have worked mostly with trained horses that don't have manners, ground manner specifically. I've been out of the "training world" for a few years now, and am wondering what the going rate per hour is for training a 3 year old gelding. He will be ridden western and I will be working with him mostly on the weekends only. What is a good rate to start at? I'm not a professional trainer, but I've definitely worked with my fair share of horses. What's a good, mid range rate to start at?

Also, since I've worked mostly with horses that want to throw me off, bite me, and step on me, what's the best way to get a three year old to move? According to the owner, he's a mild tempered, sweet boy, but he doesn't want to go forward, as if he doesn't know what to do. I don't want to use unnecessary force through incessant kicking, so what's the best way to encourage him to move?

Any and all advice is INCREDIBLY appreciated!
 

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What is a good rate to start at?

what's the best way to get a three year old to move?
Can't help you with the first part but I bet it has everything to do with where you live.

Regarding the second part, I'd teach him from the ground so he knows what to do perfectly before you get on ... watch Stacey Wesfall's video diary where she's training Jac.
 

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I charge anywhere from $25/hr (great horse, owner needs to learn or owner rides while I instruct owner) to $50/hr if the horse is dangerous and puts my life/well-being at risk. If the horse is dangerous and will need more work than 2hrs/week, I'll offer them to move the horse to my boarding barn and pay board along with $150 for myself. I rip myself off more this way, but it'll get my name out there more so I don't mind spending the extra time at the barn since I'm already there almost daily for my own horse.

As for moving the horse..get a crop/dressage whip to back up your leg. If you can't just tap it behind your leg (well, in the general area your leg cue would be), move to their butt. I, personally, don't even bother if they buck and just continue with what I was doing. Some horses I'll hit again, and some I will ORS, then continue what I was doing, depending on if they give more than one buck.
But I'd say, make sure he knows how to move forward on the ground first, makes it much easier when you get up into the saddle. The majority of horses I work with are always excessively forward and I've only ridden one horse that didn't have the best GO button..So, I can't say I'm an expert on getting a horse to go, but I've done it before and it worked.
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The going rate around my area seems to be $40 a ride, now I have no idea what that means, if you get a set amount of time, if it is as much time as it takes. I have never explored it, that is just what I have heard.

As for getting the horse to go under saddle squeeze, cluck, spank, repeat. I have lazy horse that had no go button when I got him you just keep spanking and increasing the pressure while squeezing and clucking as soon as they move release the pressure and leave them alone don't nag to try and keep them moving. Let him stop, then squeeze, cluck, spank. Eventually they learn to move off the squeeze.
 

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Ok. Also, I would be driving to her place on the weekends to work with him for no less than 2 hours, so do you think $40 would be a fair price, since it would include training and gas? I don't want to rip her off, but I don't want to go too low and end up in the whole either. She also wanted me to give her son riding lessons (once the horse is further along in the training aspect) and I've always charged $25/hr for lessons. Is that still a good rate to go by?

Ok, I will have to try that with the dressage whip. I've never had a problem with a horse going, mostly had a problem with them stopping (bucking or rearing) so I appreciate your advice.
 

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Thanks gssw5. That's what a friend of mine said as week, to charge $40/hr.

And that's good advice as well to get him going. That's what I've used for my mare, but she isn't green, so I wasn't sire if the same rules would be good for him as well.
 

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I had a guy come out and work with my horse for 2 weeks before state fair on the ground only and I think if I remember right, he charged me $125 for about a half hour at a time for about 3 sessions a week.....
 
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Can't help you with the first part but I bet it has everything to do with where you live.

Regarding the second part, I'd teach him from the ground so he knows what to do perfectly before you get on ... watch Stacey Wesfall's video diary where she's training Jac.
Awesome, i'll definitely look up some of her videos.
 

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I'm getting $50/week/horse for now. It's not much, not even close to enough, but I'm just starting, and everyone starts somewhere! I do 3-6 sessions a week, depending on weather. New Hampshire has been unusually icy this winter, so its been harder to accomplish much. Once spring comes, I'll be working with more clients, as opposed to two clients and two private horses, I'll be doing $15/hour, 5 hours/week. Again, not as much as experienced trainers, but I'm just starting. The clients will be paying for training board through my 'boss' the BO, which is about $650/month, and I will be paid by the BO.
 

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I had a guy come out and work with my horse for 2 weeks before state fair on the ground only and I think if I remember right, he charged me $125 for about a half hour at a time for about 3 sessions a week.....

you mean $125 for the whole group of sessions (a week's worth?), or for one half-hour session?
 

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There's this idea in success philpsophy that life will pay the price that you ask of it. I understand that Pat Parelli used to charge 100 bucks an hour with a three-hour minimum - before he was famous. It was in the early 80s I believe.
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Please don't tKe this wrong just wondering since your the trainer shouldn't you know how to do something as basic as getting a horse to move as far as price goes it's up to you
 

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I don't know about charges for training but...
You don't give much information on this 3 year old - are you saying that he won't move when he's being ridden?
Has he just been backed?
Does he understand any verbal cues such as clucking or 'walk on' when he's being lunged?
 

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Please don't tKe this wrong just wondering since your the trainer shouldn't you know how to do something as basic as getting a horse to move as far as price goes it's up to you
My thought, too :(

My young horses learn verbal cues ("whoa", "walk on", cluck to trot, kiss to canter) well before they are ridden. The first ride or two, a gentle leg squeeze with "walk on", active driving with my seat, and gently pulling the head to the side should be enough to get at least a sideways step or two. After a few attempts, most will make the association that those cues mean move, and you can request more and more steps and gradually eliminate the sideways pull, although I like to keep the horse in a smallish circle until I know I have brakes. I'm confused why anyone would use a whip to get movement on a first ride - seems a good way to sour the horse to the idea of being ridden! I want that first ride to be as easy and pleasant an experience as I can make it, to make the next steps easier on both of us.

A few rides in, when I know the horse understands what I'm asking but he chooses not to respond, I may use the free end of my split reins (I've never felt compelled to carry a whip.) But, you have to give him a chance to figure out what you are asking before you punish him for not responding. Regardless, if you DO opt for a whip/rein swat, be prepared in case the youngster blows up in response.
 
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