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I never use a curry comb.. usually just the regular brush for the body, soft for the face and pick the feet. Now I read that rubber soft or med curry comb should be first thing to use in the grooming arsenal and done daily. what do others use and then what do you finish with after the curry comb?
 

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I don't always curry... Maybe every two or three days, depending heavily on whether my mare is shedding... or if she found the perfect dirt to roll around in. When I do curry, I use a rubber one and follow with a pretty stiff brush to knock all the loose dirt off, then my handy soft brush to smooth everything over and get the lingering dust. I only use my curry on fleshy areas, and I won't go near her face or sensitive areas with a hard brush. I'm lucky to have a horse that loves being groomed though, and I think she would like to be curried every day. :lol:
 
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a you tube video said to start at neck to tail.. I agree that fleshy parts are a better idea?
I do go neck to tail... Just my natural grooming process. But I stick to the neck, belly, bum, etc... I don't like to curry legs or to get too rough around the spine. If I had a ribby horse I'd be pretty gentle around that area as well. Horse to horse basis, I guess, especially since some are way more sensitive than others.
 
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I love my rubber curry, I use it everyday, even if I don't ride and just groom. I am convinced that the currying I do is what keeps my horse so shiny year round. It works up the loose dirt, dead skin and brings the natural oils up. Then I just use a soft brush to brush away all the dirt. I use it gently on his legs too, to work up the dead skin and dirt. I hardly ever wash him, just hose off after a ride and he is shiny.
 

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I curry more than anything, and I do it a lot - gets the deep dirt out, circulates the natural oils for shine, gets the blood flowing to muscles, good warmup massage prior to a workout. Depending on the day, I spend up to 20 minutes just currying. Quick flick of the body/stiff brush to remove the dirt I curried up, and a once over with the dandy/soft brush for the last bit of dust, if I'm feeling it. I have a super soft small curry for the face as needed, but usually only use the soft brush on the head. Sometimes a final rub down with a cloth for extra shine or a light coat of Healthy Haircare Moisturizer, and a comb through of my short manes (which I'm always pulling little bits here and there for upkeep so it's never one big job. Long manes stay braided.) Hooves get picked out last. After a workout, I rub out sweat marks with a towel and pick hooves out before putting the horses back. I've worked for show barns and just appreciate a horse who looks well tended.
 
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Personally, I always use my curry comb first most days. I have heard if you use it to much though it can irritate their skin. My Mare gets a lot of caked on mud though, so I reckon caked on mud rubbing on the saddle pad is more irritating to the skin than frequent use of the curry bomb. But thats just me. :)
 

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I curry every day, both my horses for up to 20 minutes at a time. My old mare LOVES the curry comb. She leans right into it, stretches her head out and wiggles her lips grinding her teeth in pleasure. Its a great massage and gets all those itches for them. I'm convinced this is part of the reason she looks so good at almost 22. I use a rubber curry and do neck to tail. I also use a wide tooth grip curry. It allows me to really lean in and get a deep massage. Easily my favorite brush in my grooming kit along with my horse hair body brush.

The grip curry I use

 

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I use a curry comb every time I groom my mare. It's great for loosening caked on dirt and dried sweat, and my horse love it. Ursula lets the cross ties hold her head up and her lower lip sags halfway to the floor when I curry her. She just completely relaxes and leans into it, especially on her neck.

It is true that you should restrict curry and stiff brush usage to the fleshier areas, especially if you have a sensitive horse. I will occasionally use the curry on my horse's face or lower legs but only very carefully, and gently, and only if there is a specific reason to, such as a bit of mud on her cheek or something.

I use the curry by rubbing in circular motions, and working from the front of the horse to the back. I then follow the curry with three brushes, a stiff-bristled brush, a medium brush, and then a soft, finishing brush.
 

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You can get a finer toothed softer version of the one I just posted and its great for faces and legs.

 

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Currying is such an important grooming step. Currying not only loosens up dirt and hair, but it brings out the natural oils in your horse's coat. That combined with a balanced diet is what makes a shiny horse. I have a thick rubber curry as well as one of those jelly scrubbers that has the finer bristles on one side...great for legs and faces.
 

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I use a Zoom Groom as my curry brush. They're supposed to be for cats, but it works great on my horse! The bristles/Nubbles/whatever-you-callems are long and rubbery, and great for shedding time or loosening up mud. But if the cats see me coming with this particular cat brush, they run away. I think the cats don't like how the rubber tugs their fur, whereas to the horse it feels like a massage with lots of fingertips.
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Not so much chiming in what we do, but asking...
For those of you that regularly curry, maybe a stupid question, but how does it not pull out too much hair? The rubber would seem to me to get too much?
I would like to curry more, as they really seem to enjoy the massage, like everyone says, but I always worry I will pull too much coat, esp going into winter, since we don't blanket at all.
 

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Not so much chiming in what we do, but asking...
For those of you that regularly curry, maybe a stupid question, but how does it not pull out too much hair? The rubber would seem to me to get too much?
I would like to curry more, as they really seem to enjoy the massage, like everyone says, but I always worry I will pull too much coat, esp going into winter, since we don't blanket at all.
There is no blade or anything in a normal curry comb, and the rubber is not sticky. It doesn't snag the hair. It will rough up the hair and loosen dirt, but will not pull hair out, unless your horse is already shedding. My horses aren't blanketed over the winter either. I use a curry every time I groom. They lose a lot of hair during grooming when they are shedding, particularly in the spring, but over the winter, the hair loss during grooming is minimal to nil. They stay nice and fluffy all winter long.
 

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I use a 30yo soft rubber, oval, gently toothed curry with concentric ovals inside. I've superglued the handle because I can't find a replacement made from the same type of lovely material - modern ones on offer here are plastic, not rubber, and even the soft plastic just doesn't have the same feel and performance. The soft rubber curry is bendy and gentle enough to use lightly on legs above the knees and hocks too. It's great for shedding, but the horses just love the action of it (use it in small moving circles and really give them a nice 10min solid scrub) and they lean into it and go "more here please, could you just do this spot please" etc :). The curry doesn't clog either, just tap lightly against the fence to clear. I follow it with a soft brush to finish.
 

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There is no blade or anything in a normal curry comb, and the rubber is not sticky. It doesn't snag the hair. It will rough up the hair and loosen dirt, but will not pull hair out, unless your horse is already shedding. My horses aren't blanketed over the winter either. I use a curry every time I groom. They lose a lot of hair during grooming when they are shedding, particularly in the spring, but over the winter, the hair loss during grooming is minimal to nil. They stay nice and fluffy all winter long.
I knew there was no blade, so that wasn't a worry. :)
But I wasn't sure if that rubber texture to it pulled too much hair. :) So all the hair I see coming out is hair they are supposed to lose?
It isn't like when I put up the car window then cock my head to the side only to squeal and have multiple strands of my own hair which was very much connected and growing seconds ago?! :p
I hardly brush at all in winter, for fear of messing up their coats. Just enough to confirm cleanliness for the saddle and pad.
Thanks for the confirmation that I am worrying too much :)
 

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You don't have to use a curry comb, but my horses get a LOT of turnout, in all kinds of weather, and usually I have to scrub mud off of them, so I prefer my small rubber curries for all around brushing. I use a pebbled glove to groom my horse's faces, and they like that, moving against it, unlike they do when I use any kind of brush.
I prefer this kind and in small, so it's fits in the palm of my hand.
'http://www.statelinetack.com/item/rubber-curry/BJI17/'
I don't like the rubber curries with big knobs, nor do I like the plastic curries.
Everybody finds their favorite brushes, and i think I've tried them all. =b
 

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You don't have to use a curry comb, but my horses get a LOT of turnout, in all kinds of weather, and usually I have to scrub mud off of them, so I prefer my small rubber curries for all around brushing. I use a pebbled glove to groom my horse's faces, and they like that, moving against it, unlike they do when I use any kind of brush.
I prefer this kind and in small, so it's fits in the palm of my hand.
'http://www.statelinetack.com/item/rubber-curry/BJI17/'
I don't like the rubber curries with big knobs, nor do I like the plastic curries.
Everybody finds their favorite brushes, and i think I've tried them all. =b
Yeah, ours are out 24/7, rain, shine or snow. No blankets either. :) I am sure they are MUCH dirtier than they look, as all we do is a good rinse after each ride. The dirt at skin level gets left I am sure, but it is smoothed out and any potential pokeys are removed.
I have that curry you have... I hated it! But I think it is because it is so stiff. I feel like since it doesn't contour to the animal, it can't be comfy. I have the softer dog version of it, which works great on dogs and horses.
We have these also:
Oster ECS Coarse Curry - Statelinetack.com
Along with one that is like yours, but softer rubber. I can't find a link to it.
I really like the one for the link I gave. It is my husband's horse's but, I tend to swipe it for Snoty. I use one of those stiff body brushes, I think they are called dandy brushes. It is the brand that is made in America, and looks like boar's hair (but probably isn't), and is fairly stiff. Our horses love that one. Then I have a softer body brush that I use on faces. She loves that as well.

We bought one of those metal curries for my daughter's horse, as he is solid white, and I figured would need some extra help with dirt removal. Don't know if we will ever use it, as we aren't show people, just trail riders, so as long as the saddle isn't on it, who cares if there is a not as clean as could be bum?! lol
 

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Yeah, ours are out 24/7, rain, shine or snow. No blankets either. :) I am sure they are MUCH dirtier than they look, as all we do is a good rinse after each ride. The dirt at skin level gets left I am sure, but it is smoothed out and any potential pokeys are removed.
I have that curry you have... I hated it! But I think it is because it is so stiff. I feel like since it doesn't contour to the animal, it can't be comfy. I have the softer dog version of it, which works great on dogs and horses.
We have these also:
Oster ECS Coarse Curry - Statelinetack.com
Along with one that is like yours, but softer rubber. I can't find a link to it.
I really like the one for the link I gave. It is my husband's horse's but, I tend to swipe it for Snoty. I use one of those stiff body brushes, I think they are called dandy brushes. It is the brand that is made in America, and looks like boar's hair (but probably isn't), and is fairly stiff. Our horses love that one. Then I have a softer body brush that I use on faces. She loves that as well.

We bought one of those metal curries for my daughter's horse, as he is solid white, and I figured would need some extra help with dirt removal. Don't know if we will ever use it, as we aren't show people, just trail riders, so as long as the saddle isn't on it, who cares if there is a not as clean as could be bum?! lol
I know about the stiff ones. I hate them, too. The ones I love are really bendable and flexible, so I can curve them around the legs pretty easily. They last a long time and usually break at the handle.
 

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Oh, boy, grooming, probably my favorite thing. I'll give a list of the curries and my 'routine' for grooming.

Let's see, I've got a oval rubber curry, small face curry, a coarse finger curry (like a Grooma curry), a Sarvis (AKA Plastic) curry, and a rubber 'curry' mitt.

1. I like to start with the coarse finger curry to loosen up big clumps of dirt/ dander etc.

2. I then use the face curry on the face and legs very gently.

3. I then use the rubber curry all over the body.

4. The rubber curry mitt comes into use on the ticklish and hard to reach areas.

5 A,B, C, D, E. After that I follow a routine of dandy brush, Medium brush, body brush or flicker brush, whichever I grab first honestly, then a finishing brush.

6. I'll then 'strap' (also called wisping or banging) the horse.

7. I finish off by rubbing the coat with a sheepskin mitt.

I also use a chamois leather on occasion. For the mane and tail I pick through by hand if it's needed.
I keep sponges for face and dock cleaning, which get cleaned and replaced regularly.
I will do massages before or after grooming on occasion.

I'm very old school in grooming, but it pays off in the long run. :)
 
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