The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I always liked the way this looks on most horses, but I can't figure out the name of it, so I can't find any tutorials for how to do it. Roaching, hogging, shaving? What is it actually called?

Also, do you know the rules for a horse's hairdo (mane-do?) at low level jumping shows? I see it is usually braided, but you can't braid a mane with this cut. Since it's out of the way, do they not care?

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,270 Posts
I would call what you picture "A Mohawk"...hair standing straight on end.

Horses that you see in horse shows with braids in have a mane approximately 6" long at most. It is pulled to thin it and even it out not cut with a scissor normally.
This horse could probably be braided but the braids would be very short and a skilled braider would be best for a great ring appearance attained.
Manes that are "short" often stick up some along the neck or the hair is "trained" to lay over by putting in braids, leaving the braid long and kept like that for a few days, then remove it and see how it looks. Some horses have to wear a neck cover to keep their mane flat to the neck due to numerous hair swirls/cowlicks that make it extremely difficult training the hair down.
A schooling show you can usually get away with a neat and clean appearance without braids in hunter and equitation classes. Rated shows or local more competitive shows you would be expected to braid... the rules and expectations and allowed appearance and tack items are covered in show prize lists and the rules that the show will be run by and recognized by all riders showing in the show.
Jumpers don't do braids normally but the horses manes are kept short and neat as is the tail prepared and maintained in immaculate condition.
A roached mane {fully shaved off} growing back in will also have this appearance till it gets long enough to start to fall over...

You can achieve a "mohawk" look by pulling the mane very short, so short it really can't lie over. It then stands pretty much like this picture. It may not look as thick as this horses though if it is truly "pulled & thinned".
Certain breeds of horse are also more inclined to this "hair-do" with how their necks are shaped and due to breed parameters they follow certain "looks"....this particular horse strikes me as this is a breed "look" and normal to see with the thick crested neck and just the appearance of this horse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
I was under the impression that roaching was when a horse's mane was cut short so that it stuck up like this, and hogging was when it was shaved completely off. And I've always heard of people actually CUTTING it to achieve a roach, not just pulling it until it is ultra-short. I would think if it was pulled that much, it would be so thin that it would like flop over still but look awful because there would be barely any mane there at all.

I could be wrong though. We used scissors and trimmed it up with clippers when we did our mini gelding's mane (we hated to do it but he had a nasty wound on his neck and his mane was getting in the way) and it turned out fine.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,270 Posts
In my experience I have not heard of "hogging" but have seen polo ponies manes roached, shorn off by a electric clipper same as they do a tail head tapering down the sides of the tail bone. The polo grooms referred to it as roaching so this is the terminology I thought was proper...

Here is a link about manes... it says a roached mane and a hogged mane are one-in-the-same thing...

Mane (horse) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So, we are both correct just exposed to different names for the same thing.
:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,320 Posts
I always understood that roaching and hogging were the same things but used in different areas, much like sorrel and chestnut LOL.

If I were going to shave a mane completely off, I would just use clippers. However, when we trim our mules to give them a short cut very similar to what you posted, we use a pair of sheep shears like this.

and use them very similar to scissors and cut with the points toward the withers and the rounded end toward the ears.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top