The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So my Percheron mare Delta has some mounting issues. She knows exactly what is expected of her, but she has taken to moving away from the mounting block as well as moving away when I get a leg up. She also starts walking as soon as I am on her, and WILL NOT stop when I ask her to. Today I was asking her to stop for a good couple minutes, and she was just doing circles and backing up, but wouldn't stand still.

I know she's not confused because at first she stood well, especially for leg ups, but she has started walking away. I'm not slamming her back. Today she was the worst for a leg-up that she's ever been, it took a little while just to get her to stop backing up and swinging her butt away from me. When she finally stood and I got a leg up, she started walking off when I was still getting on.

I cannot corner her because there is electric wire on 3 sides of the arena.

Any suggestions?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,901 Posts
Actually, that electric wire would be the fastest way to teach her. Let her swing her butt into that once, and I'm pretty sure she'd never swing her butt away again.

But lately there have been a lot of threads on this and the consensus seems to be if she wants to move away, she can move away how you want her to. Get her circling you at a good lively trot. Let her do a few circles of that, and then ask her to stand still again. Repeat as neccessary.

My gelding also has the problem of not wanting to stand still after I mount. Its easy for us because the mounting block is under an awning, with a fence around it--we end up doing a dance where he takes two steps forward, I ask him to whoa, he won't so we turn into the corner of the fence and thats that. But as soon as she starts walking, back her up--I'm not sure if the backing up she does is while you're trying to mount or after, sorry--but either way, get her to back up until she wants to stop, and then back her up some more.

If the backing up is her idea (when you're on her) when she stops, make the movement your idea. My gelding used to be very gate sour, and that was the only way he would go, so thats what we did; I'd back him up for ten steps until he realized he couldn't get what he wanted, and then he'd move on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Tell her whos boss. lunge her. use a crop or spurs. NOT in a mean way... of course. have some one hold her back and maybe a have another person ride by u. a really good horse that will set a great example
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the quick reply! I have also heard other suggestions of backing her up a lot, which I'll probably end up trying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,722 Posts
when a horse is being bad for mounting i usually just get on & off them about 10 times. i just get on & get/keep them stopped. stand for 3-5 seconds then walk a few steps, halt & get off.

usually they get the idea after that =] i used to ride a horse that would literally canter off when you started to swing your leg over, not fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I retrain alot of x-racehorses. They walk as the rider or jockey is thrown up on them. The first thing I teach them is the word STAND. I use positive reinforcment, treats and pats. I also use this when I break babies, because I do them by myself most of the time. It really works, but you have to use the word, and mean it. All mine learn to stand untill I have my feet in the stirrups and I am set. Then I ask them to walk off. Have a friend help with holding the horse while you give the command and mount. Be patient and don't forget to reward good behavior.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,113 Posts
I'm not saying she is not being bad, but are you sure her saddle is not hurting her?
Before you rule it out you might want to call your vet or chiro just to be sure, especially if it has just begun to happen and she won't stop when you back her...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
the last thing you want to do with a horse that walks out from under you while mounting is make it go forward, especially not at a trot. gypsygirl has the right idea repetition is the key to learning for horses. get on and make her stop and stand, if she moves forward back her up let her stand for a few mins then start again. also, when you do want to walk forward take a step back and go the other direction. if your horse doesnt stand still you may want to try a patience lesson, tie the horse and let it stand for a while, as long as it takes for it to stand quietly, do this for a couple days and when the horse is good with that take the idea to riding. this will require a lot of patience on your part but take time to just stop and stand a while when your riding. these things will help your horse understand that it cannot just walk off when it pleases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'm not saying she is not being bad, but are you sure her saddle is not hurting her?
Before you rule it out you might want to call your vet or chiro just to be sure, especially if it has just begun to happen and she won't stop when you back her...
LOL, Honeysuga, I don't even HAVE a saddle. I've been riding bareback since August, but my ordered saddle is coming in about a week. Which has been fitted by a saddle fitter. The seat was the wrong size for me, so I had to exchange it, but when it comes will fit my girl fine.
We had a chiropractor out just last weekend, she was tense on her right side but there's nothing wrong with her. It was massaged out, we were given some exercises, and that's that.

Thank you everybody for the suggestions so far! I am going to dedicate tomorrow to trying to sort this issue out, today was her worst day by far. I don't want it escalating any further than it has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,266 Posts
I hope that electric tape was meant as a joke. If not, why not just get a cattle prod?

I bet you have a lot of other respect problems than this mounting one. For this issue to have started, it means there are other things she must have been doing for this mounting issue to finally have come to the surface.
I have both re-trained a "seasoned" horse as well as trained from scratch a baby I raised, to mount and it was essentially by boring them to death.

I am assuming that with this issue, you have already ruled out tack fitting or other health problems.To start this off, you will need someone on the ground with you to help you.

Get her near the mounting block and do what you would normally do to mount. The second she starts even moving a hair, use a firm "STAND". Don't yell just be very firm. She is a large horse, she needs to respect that. If she won't listen to you then have this person on the ground to poke her in the side and get her to actually stand so you can mount.

REPEAT-Focus on just that for a couple days until she gets the point. When she does do it, overwhelm her with "good girl!" and a one big sumo pat on the neck.

It took me 3 days to re-teach my old gelding to stand for mounting. I think I must have done it, no word of a lie probably 30 or so times. That's all I did. I would tack him up, bring him in the arena and mount, dismount, mount, dismount.

He got so bored with it, he ended up standing there and was begging me to stay on and go ride. He was sooooo bored.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,455 Posts
The mounting issue is just the tip of the iceberg. i agree with previous posters that you have more problems than just mounting rather you recognize them or not. It's hard to say just what they are having never seen your horse but I'll bet you can think of a few. You sound like a fairly inexperienced rider so I would suggest you get help from a qualified professional.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,061 Posts
the last thing you want to do with a horse that walks out from under you while mounting is make it go forward, especially not at a trot. gypsygirl has the right idea repetition is the key to learning for horses.
Actually when you work a horse like this, you have taken jittering and fidgiting and turned it into your idea; horses are lazy by nature, and when they decide to move away from you at the mount, and you in turn put their butts to work (much harder than they had planned..after all, he just wanted to sidle away to keep you from getting on), they are much quicker to catch on that standing still is the much easier option.

Yes, I do agree that repitition IS the best thing for this horse, but depending on how stubborn she is, putting her butt to work a couple of times may get much more accomplished than having a partner 'force' her to stand there. When you put the horse to work, you don't need a partner; and not many people are going to be able to have a partner there everytime they want to get on. Better to teach the horse that 'shuffling away' means much harder work than she anticipated, and have her catch on for her self that standing is the best situation. I've never had a horse not catch on after being worked a couple of times; usually the next day they don't even need to be worked on it...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,901 Posts
I hope that electric tape was meant as a joke. If not, why not just get a cattle prod?
Partially yes, and partially no....but how else do you teach a horse about the tape in the first place....you zap them with it. There was one girl somewhere on here who had a disrespectful horse (charging her in a round pen, rearing, bucking, etc) and DID use a cattle prod....once was all it took and the horse learned its lesson and never did any of it again.

Its no different than using a crop to "correct" a horse by smacking them with it...it just happens to be a low level of electricity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,266 Posts
Partially yes, and partially no....but how else do you teach a horse about the tape in the first place....you zap them with it. There was one girl somewhere on here who had a disrespectful horse (charging her in a round pen, rearing, bucking, etc) and DID use a cattle prod....once was all it took and the horse learned its lesson and never did any of it again.

Its no different than using a crop to "correct" a horse by smacking them with it...it just happens to be a low level of electricity.
You do realize my initial response was not serious right. I would never, ever consider any "painful" method to re-traine or teach a horse anything. That should be left for another discussion.

To get back on topic-anyone has more advice? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks everyone!
Yep, My2Geldings and kevinshorses, you're right. She has zero respect for me in most areas - yesterday it took 10 minutes to catch her, just because she didn't' feel like getting caught. She's also difficult to get a bridle on, because she'll poke her nose into the air.
My mom is calling my old trainer/instructor today, because yesterday Delta threatened to kick me when she wouldn't let me catch her. This has obviously gotten beyond my control, since we let her in with the rest of the herd last week she'd still figuring out her place, and she has decided to try getting above me as well.
I'll keep everyone posted, thanks for your suggestions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,266 Posts
Oh good for you for bringing a trainer into the situation! It's great news. Hopefully everything turns out safely and positively for you guys.

Good luck :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Thanks. Unfortunately it was -38 celcius today with windchill. We're going to wait until it warms up a bit before doing anything. This cold weather is ridiculous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
I have gotten a few horses through mounting naughties, but each horse is different. You have gotten great advice, it is up to you. Here is what I have done: I have a mean, big sounding, "knock-it-off" voice that I use when I need their attention "now." I save that voice for special occasions when they need to quit it NOW. When they decide to squirrel away from the mounting block, that is when I use it. Sometimes getting after them in this way is enough, but there is plan B.

Now, it depends on your set up, but if you can chase her in a circle around you if she acts up, that could work. I would attach the lunge line, have it with me as I attempt to mount. If she moved off - immediately I would chase her off in a lunging fashion - and I mean make her move. Keep her moving until she starts to submit and then allow her to come back to the block. If she does it again, repeat. It may take 3-4 times, but she will get tired and start to think standing for mounting is a better option. Let her know she is doing well when she is standing - my horses all know my "good, girl/boy" tone. That means they are doing something right.

This has worked for me in the past with mounting block issues - but like I say every horse is different. Otherwise, I would seek the advice of an assistant. Good luck and let us know what you try!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks, aynelson.

Today I'm going out and going to work on only haltering (she has an issue with getting caught, too) and mounting. I'll let you guys know how it goes!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top