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Hi!
Sometimes I haven't got a clue, why a rider bought precisely the horse, he or she bought. I know a lot of horse riders and horses, that are not a good team. To be true, I don't know a lot of riders and horses that I would consider a perfect match.


I think that there are different types of "not matching":
- The horse is "too much horse" for the owner (because the horse is difficult or just because it is young and inexperienced).
- The horse is not suitable for the category of horse riding (Dressage, Show jumping,..) the owner wants to do.
- The owner is to small/tall or heavy for his horse.

When do you think that horse and rider match?
Do you know a lot of horses and riders that match?
 

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The most noteable example I can think of a horse not matching was a woman at my old barn, she was petite, about 5', probably 60 years old. She was an extremely timid woman, and an extremely timid rider.

Her horse was a four year old 17+ hh oldenburg, very beautiful, very interesting color (gray, but with chestnut flicks in a fleabitten pattern, I have no idea what it'd be called) very hot, very spooky. He definitely needed an advanced/confident rider. Even us barn help were intimidated just bringing him in from the pasture. He regularly reared, tried to bolt and spooked at the same things everyday, the barn door, the horses in the stalls, children, rocks, dogs, insects, the person leading him, etc. He wasn't mean though, thank goodness. No bitting or striking out, just a very nervous animal. If you went to his field, he would come right up to you and enjoy some petting.

She fell from him almost every time she rode him. The BO ended up riding him much more than she did. Eventually she took the horse to a different barn (I got to be the lucky one that trailered him! BO didn't have a big enough trailer) and I actually think she ended up doing much better with him with her new trainer. She came back one time to do a show and the horse was surprisingly calm and she looked happy. So at least the story has a happy ending (maybe?). I have no idea what they are doing now though.

She spent a lot of money both on him and on training fee's and board fee's at my old barn, he was there for at least two years not making much progress, both on the ground and being ridden. Plus all those falls couldn't have been good for her. It was definitely a case of being over mounted. But she loved the horse I guess!

Thinking about it now, I guess I do know quite a few riders who for whatever reason were not happy with their horses. Interestingly enough, those who had horses that didn't fit what they wanted to do (jumping, dressage, w/e) were very quick to sell their horses, but people who were over mounted hung on to that horse.

Another memorable girl- my former best friend who boarded my horses on occasion. She started out with a big gray quarter horse, but she didn't want him because she didn't like his color. Sold him and bought a dun yearling. Sent her off to training and when she got back, decided she didn't want a dun, she wanted to show on the appaloosa circuit. Sold the dun, bought an appaloosa. Had the horse in training for a few months, and then decided she wanted the dun back. Sold the appaloosa and now doesn't ride at all. When I talked to her regularly, she would still complain that she would have been amazing if she'd kept her dun horse. I'm not sure what she was looking for in a horse, it's bizarre to me that someone wouldn't like a horse just because of it's color.

This turned out to be quite long, so I'll end it now.
 

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There are a few people at my barn who need to get different horses. Or shouldn't have a horse at all.

There's a woman there that has two geldings: one is a 28yo who's well behaved but can only be ridden lightly. He's a very good match for her, but her other horse is a 6yo Paint who rears and strikes out unpredictably. I won't even go into his stall to feed him because his temper can flare up out of the blue and he'll bite, kick, etc. She's even admitted that he's struck out at her when she was leading him up from the pasture. She's very timid and the horse needs a professional trainer. He hasn't even been mistreated to my knowledge, so I don't know where his temper comes from.

There's also a pony called Jack that belongs to a little girl. Everyone calls him Jack Attack. He was about 6 years old when they got him and only broke to drive. The first day they brought him home, he tried to jump over his stall wall. He also rushes the gate at feeding time and barges through it if you're not careful. He's reared and bolted with the girl on him and he also bites. He likes to team up with the psychotic Paint gelding I mentioned before and try to run people over. It's not all his fault because his owner is a buttwipe. I kinda feel bad for him because every time something happens, they always blame it on him. He would probably turn into a great pony with a decent trainer, but he has no guidance or structure and they don't take very good care of him. No wonder he's loony.
 

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One of the hardest things about being a trainer is finding a good match for one of your students. There is nothing worse then having a kid struggle with a horse that's not a good fit. I'm very picky and insist that the parents not invest money until we find the right one. It might take MONTHS, the kid might miss out on half the show season, but very rarely will I put something in the trailer unless I'm 100% sure it'll be ok. And even when I'm sure I still try and get a trial period. Keeping a horse is expensive, why pay money on something that's not a good match?
 

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I know several people who need to get differant horses, without a doubt. But there's also a few who couldn't change if they tried.

I truly believe me and my horses are all compatible, some more than others. There are a few quirks that make them sort of challenging but they put up with my mistakes and I put up with theirs and we all learn together. The only horse I'm not compatible with so far is Honey....dear god, she is just too intelligent for me to deal with. She's sneaky, deceiving, and incredibly stubborn in the arena. And that's a problem with me since I'm an arena rider most of the time.

It just depends. You'll know when you find the horse that's just right for you because the horse will know too, if that makes sense :)
 

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My one friend's horse is absolutely perfect for her, they are fantastic together and it is very heartwarming to see. I am currently looking for my perfect partner. :)
 

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Me and Rena always get comments of " being a harmionious pair" and comments from people at the barn that we work well together. I think we work well together because we understand eachother, i know she doesnt like me getting in her way, but that she does like to have guidence. to me finding a horse that you understand is what its about. I know a few people tha need different horses, not just because they dont look like a good team, but because the horse needs to be worked with and stuff because hes very spooky, and the rider doesnt think he needs it and just smacks him when he spooks.
 

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i knew of one girl who had a horse (gorgeous chestnut anglo-arab) that wasn't so good for her although when you looked at them they were so much alike she used to keep the horse at my dads and the first year she had him she done really well with him then after that she came down less and less and when she did she started to struggle with him.it eventually got to the stage where when she did come down it wouldnt be to ride it was just to say hi then leave anyways after about two years they send him away to get re-schooled then moved him to a field closer to where they lived which is probably a good thing because i think half the battle was getting a way out to see him i have no idea how they're getting on know though.
 

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The majority of the ladies I know all have horse's too big for them. Reading alot of these posts again I feel alot of ladies pick horses too big. A big horse can be very intimidating.
Plus I am tired of boosting them up on their big guys.:lol::lol::lol:
Ladies pick smaller horses, more in proportion to your size.
 

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one of the horses i ride is rocky he's about 16'1 / 16'2 and im five foot i can manage to get up on him alright, it gets easier after the first few times like
 

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i have two perfect partners, they arent too big for me at least i look ok on both of them and i trained both of them so theyre where i want them to b and have the perfect temperment for me and i show them in the disciplines they are good at. making perfect matches is something my last trainer taught be how to b very good at. my students pony/horse is perfect for her right now. hes a 15h Connemara/QH x that is very small built and shes not very big. he was taught as a ranch horse so he's super calm not fast at all and is a great packer for her even on the 2'6 fences as shes still learning so i think for now they are a perfect fit
 

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I think if you can't mount without a mounting block then your horse is too big. What happens if you're out on the trail and you need to get off?
 

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I know too many over mounted, poorly mounted people.

2 examples-
1. My mom, she has her "dream horse" one problem, she is too timid to ride the 16 hand ex broodmare, untrained,behemoth.

2. moms boyfriend- Knows SQUAT about horses, so what does mom buy him??? A 3 year old green as grass 15.2 hand TWH.

So many others...

I think people look at the vanity aspect when buying a horse nowadays, and do not really consider what they are getting themselves into. Tom is a munchkin of a horse at barely 15 hands, but I can mount him easily from the ground. We click in the saddle and on the ground. Would I like a horse that is bigger, yes, is bay my favorite coat pattern, far from it. But when it all comes down to it we fit and he is a great partner to me, no matter how he looks(which is darn cute!!)
 

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I think if you can't mount without a mounting block then your horse is too big. What happens if you're out on the trail and you need to get off?

How do you get on? Tree stumps, rock walls, stand uphill from the horse and jump big. My legs are very long. If I had a horse shorter than my 16.2 TB, I'd look ridiculous on it. Several people have told me my horse and I are perfect for each other. We both seem to be in the same mood in terms of what we want to do for a ride on any particular day. We both have the attention spans of gnats, and we're both skinny tall sticks. We both can be goofy for no particular reason and find it amusing. We were even both born in the same state and he raced at my favorite track in the country. I'd say we were made for each other.
 

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Exactly. Not all of us trail ride, either. Have you ever seen Debbie McDonald with Brentina, or Isabelle Werth with Warum Nicht? surely those riders - as fit and toned as they are - must use a mounting block on such large horses with their compared stature, yet they still put in great rides with these horses that they trained themselves.

I'm 5'2", I'm quite light-boned and weigh 90 pounds on a good day (I'm not underweight, just so you know. I'm quite healthy). Freddy is 17.2, and off the racetrack. Having the attitude of badger with a thorn in his butt and a different personality everyday, we often joke that people get to ride six different horses for the price of one when they lease Freddy. I leased him for almost two years. I wouldn't have made it that long if at any point I thought he was unsuitable/too much for me. Surely, even if I didn't say something, my trainers would have had the situation changed. And, quite frankly, I'm proud that I stuck with him through the good and the bad. I learned so much more with him than any of the other horses I had ridden previous.
I only wish it could have ended differently. But when my injury gets better and I'm fit again, I'm determined to get back on him - even just once.
 

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I knew a lady who should not have had any horses let alone the horses that she had. She had 4 horses. Two of them were a mare with her year old foal that wasn't weaned yet. Another one was a 4 year old stud (saddlebred cross I believe) who ran through every fence he saw. And the last was a gelding that couldn't be haltered or anything. She treated the horses like lap dogs and they treated her like something to be trampled.

I also know a few very well matched pairs... and all of those people are a lot more experianced, and in my opinion knew what to look for in a horse that would make a good horse for them.
 

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Hmm. Wow this got me thinking. Personally I'm not sure if I suit my horse? I love him to death and he's been one of my kids for 8 years but do we really match.

Concerning people I see ride. I'm lucky to ride at a stable where people actually know what they're doing and have amazing horses that fit them. Granted the owner/instructor/BM pretty much helped everyone find the horses they own and she was an olympic shirt-listed rider so she knows what she's talking about. My friend Kelsey has an OTTB that suits her perfectly. The mares a bit crazy at times but they work well together. Then Justine, has an OTTB too and I swear that girl could ride any horse. Her and Rosie are the most amazing pair I've been friends with.

My friend Helena has a Morgan that she works amazingly with, and they look good together. The only person I'm not sure about is Randi. Personally I don't think she should have a horse. Her gelding cut his leg and from what I understand it was something the vet should have seen. She didn't call the vet, put vet-wrap aroudn the wound{not bandage} and rode like 2 days later.
 

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What starts off as a not-so-good match can often turn out to be the perfect match.

I know of one girl who bought her first horse/pony, a QH pony cross guy who'd been gelded late in life and basically ran around like a wild horse in a pasture with a couple other stallions for the first half of his life. Anyways, Sage had the typical pony attitude. Spunky, mischievous, stubborn, and tried to get away with everything. He went througha a phase in which he'd run off with his owner at least once during every ride. She'd be in tears some days, swearing that she'd sell him. But you know what? She didn't and instead became a better rider. Sage never lost his fire but he greatly improved and they became one of my favorite pairs around the barn.

A bad match that we have is a green rider with way too much horse. She's in 6th grade and her mom bought her the horse from the BO. This is a formerly 2nd Level mare that got messed up in her training along the way. The mare is a dear and takes very good care of the girl, but I don't think either of them is benefitting. What the girl really neads is a steady senior horse who's done it all so she can actually learn how to find her balance and gain confidence.

As for myself and my horse, I don't know if we're a good match, but I can't imagine life without her. I have a feeling that some people think I'm under mounted and kinda hint that I should sell her and get a more advanced horse since it's obvious that she won't be able to successfully show above 2nd or 3rd Level, but she's my lifer. Sure, I may admire the imported warmbloods winning at the shows, but can their owners jump on them bareback in a halter and gallop around a racetrack? Can they go for trail rides alone through a cattle herd? Can they hop on their horse in a 100+ acre pasture and canter up hills tackless? Some of them are too hot to enjoy those sorts of things. I love my grade mare and I love that we can do dressage movements and just hang out as horse and rider.
Sorry for rambling! =P Long story short, I don't know how I knew that my horse and I "matched." It just happened.
 

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Thinking about it now, I guess I do know quite a few riders who for whatever reason were not happy with their horses. Interestingly enough, those who had horses that didn't fit what they wanted to do (jumping, dressage, w/e) were very quick to sell their horses, but people who were over mounted hung on to that horse.
The only conclusion I've ever come to is that people don't want a horse that is below their riding level, or outside their "sport" or other passion, because many times, a horse may not be able to compete/perform at the level the rider can; people will keep a horse that is above their riding level, hoping to rise to, and sometimes achieving the horse's level to better themselves... but some are not always so lucky to reach the horse's level. Others run out of money, LOL.
 

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How do you get on? Tree stumps, rock walls, stand uphill from the horse and jump big.

LOL. Isn't there some kind of extra stirrup thing you can use for that? I wouldn't try relying on the landscape myself! Unless you're jumping competitively a tall horse is a disadvantage IMHO.
 
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