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I was wondering about trailers without windows that close. I mean, open stock trailers, or any kind of open trailer. Given that the floor is wood and the material is often steel, wouldn't not having windows allow water into the inside of your trailer, which would rot the wood and cause rust in the metal?
 
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What will hurt your stock trailer and floor more than anything is not washing it out after use and removing every bit of urine and feces that you can. If you have mats remove them, wash them and let the floor dry out good then you can replace. The urine and feces are highly corrosive to the steel if it is not removed. My stock trailer has only needed the floor replace twice since it was new in 1987. When I replaced it I used pressure treated wood and it resists rot very well. Maintenance goes along way toward making things last. My LQ horse trailer has an aluminum floor with rubber mats over it. I still remove the mats periodically and thoroughly clean mats and floor and let them dry before replacing even though it has windows and vents that let it close up completely.
 

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My open stock trailer is a 1987 Ponderosa that I bought brand spanking new. I might have the only one left on that planet That is road worthy.

When I lived in PA, where road salt is king, I sent my truck & trailer to the oiler every fall, brought it home and let the oil drip off in my driveway (gasp!!)

The frame still does not have any rust, neither does the inside, the outside has a bit of surface rust.

Carpenter ants took out my first set of floor boards. I had no idea they enjoyed treated wood so much. When the tongue and groove had to be replaced, I had a second floor installed on top of the first floor because, by then, I was pretty sure I would be moving to SoCal which I did.

In total the floor has been replaced three times, two of those times since moving to Tennessee and being exposed to a lot of rain and high humidity.

So yes, rain constantly blowing in will affect the integrity of the wood floor.

Only the side of the trailer that the wind blows in (it sits against the workshop) gets wet and stays wet. Since we never got around to building an overhang off the side of the workshop, DH solved that by covering the trailer with a marine tarp. He has a pully system rigged in the workshop to remove the tarp and put it back on.

I cant ride anymore so the trailer sits. When we took the tarp off to go get Duncan last year, it was the first time the trailer had been on the road since 2015. The floor was great. The worst part about that was not the floor, it was having to spend money on four new tires because the other tires with plenty of tread were rain rotted.

As @ksbowman commented, keep the trailer washed out and keep the mats out of the trailer unless it is being used a few times weekly.
 

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We bought an open stock trailer in 1990 and used it to haul everything you can imagine: furniture, lawn mowers, cattle panels etc. We never replaced the floor and the floor was still solid when I sold it last year. The metal framing of the side walls was rusting out so I decided I needed a newer trailer.

We always washed our trailer out after using it. Normally we carried a shovel in the from dressing room/storage area and we always shovel all manure out as soon as we stopped somewhere. For two years we used this trailer for a commercial business visiting farms. On our way home we would stop at a car wash and sanitize the entire inside of the rig and power wash all the equipment that was loaded in the trailer.

My new trailer is 95% aluminum because I wanted a trailer with windows that closed for trailering during the cold weather. I find it much harder to load a horse into an enclosed trailer so I'm still working on that aspect of moving/loading. I can make my gelding get in but he doesn't like it. We are improving his acceptance and I'm able to get in to walk in three or four times so we're working on keeping him calm and just standing inside now.

I've pulled both gooseneck and bumper-pull trailers and I find that gooseneck rigs are more stable at higher speeds but bumper-pulls are easier to hook up and back up although less stable at freeway speeds. If I were traveling any great distance, I'd choose a gooseneck. However, all my hauling is very close distances so I bought a bumper-pull and I'm looking forward to getting off the farm more this year.
 

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. I might have the only one left on that planet That is road worthy.
Nope. I have one too! A 1987 Ponderosa. Lucky me, it was "given" to me in a lopsided trade (why I consider it a gift) when I traded my simple little two horse for a gooseneck with home made living quarters. I LOVE my trailer. I replaced the floor once and am going to replace it again very soon.

Oh, I lucked out on the lopsided trade because an elderly riding friend was no longer going camping, still wanted a trailer in case he had to evacuate, and wanted my kids and me to have fun camping with horses. He didn't need it anymore, and did not feel the need to make money by selling it. Wasn't that generous and kind of him!
 

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My trailer has no windows in the sides since it is a stock design that allows much cooling and breathing since we are located in hot & humid Florida...

Does rain get inside....sure if it is blowing the right direction, otherwise it runs off the top and either down the drip rail or over the drip rail edge if a deluge happens.
My trailer actually has less places where water accumulates like sliding window tracks and cuts into the walls where windows are located :eek:
My roof is solid, not have vents and venting receptacles that need yearly care done to them.
My trailer nose has a window {solid} non-movable glass but the window itself opens on a hinge....that opening has had new gasketing material put in several times now so when doing highway speeds it not rattle nor seep air or wet onto my horses faces.
I have butterfly vents which when traveling are closed as they are vents and allow forced air enough entry without a gale or hurricane force wind to the face and eyes of my horse{s} traveling.
Our trailer has a wood floor then thick heavy mats that fits very tightly together....when we use the trailer it is swept clean, then mats pulled or flipped to allow drying if needed.
Many times we trailer and our horses not make any mess in the trailer means a easier cleanup to follow.
We do strip, clean floor and mats as needed, allow thorough drying then replace the mats...

In actuality, I think open trailers although they may get wet inside, they also dry better because there is air flow constantly happening. Just sitting in my yard my trailer always is affected by a gentle breeze and air flow..
We use our trailer a lot so it is not sitting in a building but in bright sunlight much of the year.
The trailers that close up tight make condensation, have no airflow inside so condensation moisture just sits and corrodes, rots floors, floor and wall junctions and such... :unsure:
When you kill airflow you invite issues....

AC, your trailer is already old enough when you do that yearly maintenance it should be including resealing windows and vents, especially those on the roof. Your roof and roof vents should of already been checked for "leaking" caulking done where they remove old and replace with quality new..
Brutal sun in Texas and just environmental issues you must be proactive in staying ahead of destructive issues no matter what materials your trailer is made from, all trailers need preventative maintenance done no matter how much or little the vehicle is used.
🐴...
 

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I have an old 70 something stock trailer that I used until I bought my new one in 2003. The old one is sitting in the woods behind the house, I keep saying I'm going to turn it into a chicken coop. It actually held up really, really well. I did clean it out after every use. I had more issues with rust then wood rot.

My new one is all aluminum. Well (it's not new anymore, it's 20 years old now).
 

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It does definitely shorten the lifespan. I had an old 2 horse trailer and it rotted out the back doors. Having doors welded and replaced is expensive. I sold it and upgraded.

My new trailer has homemade windows that I installed myself. They are strictly for keeping rain out during storage. Not for driving down the street with.
 
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