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I have a 12 year old pony who I rescued (with a past of founder) 2 years ago and now a few days ago he started limping. Then I noticed any time I go out there he would be laying down all alone. I had the vet out and they ran some tests on him and it's not limes disease or anoplasmosis the vet also said he doesn't think it's laminitis. I have been soaking his feet in cold water and the essential oil lavender and then wrapping his legs and making sure he only eats soaked hay and making sure he walks every hour or two bc if it were up to him he wouldn't ever get up :( any suggestions on what to do would be appreciated
 

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You don't say where you are, so here's just what I would do because I have several vets in my area.

#1, Bute or Banamine for pain, to see for sure if he's in pain.

#2, Find another vet.
 

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One idea immediately come to mind...
I'm not a vet but can tell you positively there is medication available that will help a horse/pony with those symptoms, IF if is IR related.
Don't know the name of that medication but have watched it perform "a miracle" on my neighbors horse.
The horse unknown to her was IR........

Your horse previously foundered, so you're soaking your hay {to reduce sugars?}....
What kind of feed are you feeding and how much?
What kind of pasture/grass is the horse out on? {if any?}
What time of day and was that pasture/grass recently fertilized???

My other idea is..........

You are soaking for a possible abscess???
Although you have good intentions, the idea about soaking the feet with "oils" may not be in the animals best interest.
There is a fine line between making a hoof soft from to much moisture....be cautious about how much soaking you do and what you put in the water.
I was also under the impression that the oil you are using is to be combined with warm water and with Epsom salts....
Why are you wrapping his legs? :-?

Obviously the animal has pain and wants to be off his feet because they hurt.
I don't know if I would be forcing the animal to walk on feet that cause so much distress he wants to be off them this much.
You've had the pony for 2 years and this is the first time you see him lame and sore?
What else possibly changed in his environment recently?
New feed? Did he get into extra feed?
New hay? Different kind of hay? Richer than past hays fed?
New stall bedding or turnout area?
Any weed/plant he could of ingested?
All things to investigate and take into consideration........

I agree with the others....
You need a second opinion
or at least your vet to come back and really look for what is causing the issue and what he as a medical practitioner can do to help the animal...
Have you reached out to speak to your farrier about this?
A good farrier can sometimes help you to find the issue....
Might be worth a phone call to inquire..

I offer you "Good Luck" in finding the cause and a solution for your pony....not easy watching.

If they could just talk to us....
:runninghorse2:
jmo..
 

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The vet gave him bute sorry forgot to mention that but still seems to be in pain and I'm in Isanti minnesota
just curious why you would check for anaplasmosis or lymes in this case. Was his blood work abnormal? Unusual to do blood work for lameness.
With out proper diagnostics you don't have a direction for treatment.
 

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Is there heat and swelling in the legs?
If not it is likely a hoof problem.
Get the farrier out, they know more about hooves than vets do :)
 

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Is there heat and swelling in the legs?
If not it is likely a hoof problem.
Get the farrier out, they know more about hooves than vets do :)
I doubt it's a leg. They don't usually lie down for that.

Second the farrier though if a second vet isn't an option (though I would try to make it one).

With the disclaimer I will say again it strongly sounds like a laminitis/founder attack. Regardless it needs someone knowledgeable in person, the first vet seems a little clueless.
 

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Of course, we're not there to see the horse, let alone vets to diagnose, haven't even got much info or pics(hoof pics will help us have more idea - see signature link) but this sounds like a serious founder. What made the vet think otherwise? In absence of answers/successful treatment from the first vet, I second getting a second vet's opinion & treating him as a founder case in the meantime at least.

Founder/acute laminitis first aid management;

Soaked hay is good, no grass or rich feed. Extra magnesium in the diet, along with whatever other nutritional supps for balance.

Keep him on soft, yielding footing and DON'T force him to exercise if he's too sore to do so. Bute may be necessary/helpful initially, when there's inflammation, but best short term only.

Get a good farrier *experienced in *successful* founder rehab to come advise/trim ASAP, to ensure feet are well balanced & trimmed in such a way as to alleviate further mechanical damage. **If unsure as to the state of the hooves, do not exercise the horse until this is done.

Padding his feet, with styrofoam, closed cell foam, soft rubber... even disposable baby nappies will be helpful. The aim is to get him comfortable to exercise, without further pain or damage, because exercise is helpful, but if unprotected/hurting, can make matters worse.
 
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