The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering if my little one is wormy or just getting a hay belly? You can see her ribs on occasion, and feel them pretty easily. I de-wormed her on April 1st because I noticed she had rubbed her tail. The time before that was March 1st, and the time before that was December 1st. I can't for the life of me remember what I used, but it was a different one each time.

I took these pictures on the 19th.






Here is the picture of her when I first got her, a year ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,763 Posts
Not at all. Babies look pretty awkward when growing up. It is probably just a grass/hay belly. Shes cute!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
You can't just look at a horse and know that it has a significant parasite load.

You also need to KNOW what you are deworming with and the details about that specific product. Dewormings a month apart may do you absolutely no good depending on what two products you used in what order just because of how long they suppress egg shedding and what types and life-stages of worms they affect.

In WA, unless you didn't do a fall deworming with ivermectin or moxidectin there is no reason to deworm in Dec. At that time of the year the weather inhibits parasite reinfection rates.

How old is this horse? Do you have any idea of the names/types of products you used? How is she normally kept? Are paddocks/pastures picked regularly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
You can't just look at a horse and know that it has a significant parasite load.

You also need to KNOW what you are deworming with and the details about that specific product. Dewormings a month apart may do you absolutely no good depending on what two products you used in what order just because of how long they suppress egg shedding and what types and life-stages of worms they affect.

In WA, unless you didn't do a fall deworming with ivermectin or moxidectin there is no reason to deworm in Dec. At that time of the year the weather inhibits parasite reinfection rates.

How old is this horse? Do you have any idea of the names/types of products you used? How is she normally kept? Are paddocks/pastures picked regularly?
No, you can't. You need fecal egg counts and floats and whatnot, which, honestly, seem like a waste of time in my situation. BUT you can look at a horse and guess. There are lots of times that I've posted in critiques saying they looked wormy, and I wasn't the only one. I was just wondering if she looked wormy, because maybe someone is seeing something I'm not.

Yes, I should know what I used, but I don't, and threw away the carton. I usually do, but I've never had a worm-related problem so it's not at the top of my "must remember" list. Maybe it should, and I'll try to keep better track, but at this point, there is no reason to dwell on the fact that I don't remember.

I de-worm every three months. December, March, June, and September. The one in April was impromptu because of the tail rubbing. BUT, if I can skip December by using something in particular, I'll definitely look into. Saved money is saved money. =]

Gracie is 20 months. She is kept outside 24/7 and pastures are not picked at all. Hopefully this summer when it dries up, I'll get a tractor out and clean everything, at least that's the plan. But as of now, most everything is a big soupy mess. They do have specific bathroom spots though, and never graze anywhere near it.

As far as guesses, I really don't have any... Quest maybe? Pyrantel? No idea. I could just be thinking of those because of the posts I've read today. =|

EDIT: I just re-read what I wrote and I realize I might be coming across a little snippy, but that is not at all the intention. I don't want to take the time to re-write and make it sound less snippy, but rest assured, everything was said with the utmost respect and no eye rolling in sight! =D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
965 Posts
Nope, she doesn't look wormy to me at all either. Just a little grass/hay belly that I want to go up and cuddle with haha.

I know a lot of people say that horses don't really need wormed in the winter, but honestly, they do. Of course they may not get worms as easily in the winter as in the warmer months, but that doesn't mean that they can't get them. We worm ours every 3 months as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pechos, she'd love that! Gracie is a total cuddle bug! =D

I was leaning closer to the "not wormy" side, but seeing as my mare doesn't ever get a hay belly or anything, I'm just not used to it, lol. And to top it off, Gracie's coat is shiny, soft, and healthy looking, not to mention she is shedding very well. Last year, her coat was dull and lackluster, and it took her until the middle of July to really start shedding.

Phew! Well that's good. She'll get de-wormed again in June, and I think I'll stick with dosing every 3 months. It can't hurt. =]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
In the southern US, yes you do need to deworm in the winter. But in the northern US where it's cold you simply DO NOT. Sorry, not just my opinion but the opinion of the parasitologists as well and they have done the studies to back up their opinions. There is absolutely no reason to deworm an adult horse in the northern US in the dead of winter because they are highly unlikely to have a heavy parasite load unless you didn't deworm during the summer or fall. It's a waste of money and only serves to increase the speed at which resistance to drugs develops.

Spring and fall deworm with ivermectin/praziquantel or moxidectin/praziquantel and then this summer get a fecal egg count the middle of the summer---3 monhts after you last dewormed if you used ivermectin or 4 months after if you used moxidectin. That will help you to see what kind of parasite load your horse picks up during the time of heaviest reinfection.

Getting an accurate assessment of your horse's parasite egg shedding is one of the best ways to save money and do a good job on deworming. About 50% of adult horses in a herd need no more than 2 dewormings a year. Horses that are kept stalled all the time also generally need no more than 2 dewormings a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
868 Posts
I don't think she does.

It's only like $15-$20 to have the fecal test done, all new horses coming into my barn have to have it to clear quarantine. My filly did not look wormy when I got her but the test came back loaded with worms! When we got rid of the worms she got a hay belly the rest of the summer. Now she is kinda filling out in other places and working the belly off playing and looks much more "normal" now ;) She's 14 months old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,284 Posts
In the southern US, yes you do need to deworm in the winter. But in the northern US where it's cold you simply DO NOT. Sorry, not just my opinion but the opinion of the parasitologists as well and they have done the studies to back up their opinions.
Ryle, I totally get what your saying and YES I have listened to the entire Web presentation on The Horse. The thing is that when it comes to the weather in this part of the world you can't make general statements. I'm in BC Canada, just spitting distance from where Ricci lives. This past winter was very mild, in fact I think we had one short cold snap in Nov and that was it. This year, like many other years the temps were NOT cold enough for a complete kill.

There's a big difference between Washington State and say North Dakota both of which are the northern USA.

No she doesn't look wormy or thrifty at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
Ryle, I totally get what your saying and YES I have listened to the entire Web presentation on The Horse. The thing is that when it comes to the weather in this part of the world you can't make general statements. I'm in BC Canada, just spitting distance from where Ricci lives. This past winter was very mild, in fact I think we had one short cold snap in Nov and that was it. This year, like many other years the temps were NOT cold enough for a complete kill.
It's not that cold kills the parasites. It doesn't. But when temps are below 45 degrees the strongyle eggs don't mature into infective larva. And when temps are above 45 but below the 70's then they are still going to mature much much more slowly because they are very sensitive to the tempature. So eggs on the pasture or shed during winter months in the northern continental US aren't going to be maturing into infective stages during the winter months. So even if temperatures weren't as bitterly cold as normal, they are still cold enough to minimize reinfection rates in the northern US. And add in the fact that during the winter months there is generally very little grazing in the north and horses are living on hay also decreases the likelihood of reinfection.

So unless the temps remained up near the 60-70's all winter the risk of reinfection isn't high enough to require deworming.


(All of this including the -no such thing as a killing frost was in the webinar.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,284 Posts
And when temps are above 45 but below the 70's then they are still going to mature much much more slowly because they are very sensitive to the temperature.
And that's the range we pretty much stayed in all winter. So while they may mature much more slowly there is still a possibility of re-infestation especially if you have the horse's on shared pasture.

Have you ever visited this part of the world? Winter is rain and more rain, little to no snow. That in itself should give you an indication of the temps we have.

Like I said go east a couple of states and the weather changes drastically from the "Wet Coast".

Climate of Vancouver - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Climate in Fargo, North Dakota
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
To get an egg count, would I just bring in some manure to the vet's office? Would I need both Ricci's and Gracie's, or is one sample enough? OR would I need to have the vet out? I know, I could call and ask, but that's an awful lot of effort when you folks know so much. =]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I would do both, it's cheap so why not.

You get a fresh sample from both and put in 2 Ziplock bags with their name on it. I just drop mine off at the vets office. I have answers by the next day.
Okay, so one more silly question. How "fresh" does it have to be? Because Ricci almost always poops in the crossties when I bring her into the barn after she's started eating, but I rarely catch Gracie in the act. If push comes to shove, I'm sure one sample would do, seeing as they are both together 24/7 and it would give me a general idea of Gracie's count as well. But like you said, it's cheap, so why not both?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
Ricci- if you can get something from the last 12 hours or so, that would be best. You should do separate samples though because horses do develop immunity to some parasites as they get older and since your girls are such different ages their immunity is likely to be different.

Ryle, though she is in the northern US, western Washington has a very mild winter climate and most vets in her area do recommend the winter deworming, and I know this year was particularly mild. I used to live in that neck of the woods and it has a very strange, anomalous climate! Jump over the mountains to where I am (nearly same latitude) and it is very different so we use ivermectin in november and call it good until spring time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
Ok, well you can tell I've never been to Washington. I prefer warmer winters and hot summers ;)
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top