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Discussion Starter #1
My German shepherd is 2 and a half and she likes to kill animals. She has brought many many deer legs and parts home, a few jack rabbits, chickens, birds, mice and two of our barn cats. Never have gone after our horses though. We got her from a human society and she was around 5 months when we got her and her and my lab male get along pretty well they will 'fight' and play but nether have made each other bleed or anything. My dad (kinda my mom) wants to put her down but she is my dog that I got after I lost my dog of 16 years.

Is there anything to do with her? Or is the only option to put her down?

They are outside dogs and we are in the country ten acres and no one for miles around us. They have the garage and a dog house and get food twice a day. We play with them daily. They wanna put her down because they want chickens and other birds and let them out and not have to worry. I've told them to get a wireless collar thing to keep her near the house.
 

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Wireless collars aren't 100% effective and that won't stop the other animals - chickens etc - from coming up TO the house. Chickens aren't the brightest animals. Honestly if she's been killing things this long she's probably not going to stop. You might look into rehoming her rather than putting her down though, just to a home that doesn't have any other small animals or access to them.
 

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Does she show any aggression towards humans? If no, then consider rehoming her (with a fee, of course) to someone who doesn't have any pets, and with no plans to get any.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
She is fine to us but we don't have many people at the house so she doesn't meet many people. Maybe ten to twenty people come out every year but usually the same people. I don't know how well she would do with other people..

It's hard to think about putting her down as she's healthy and young. I put down my first puppy a year after I got him because he was being paralyzed in the back end. And that was hard enough.
 

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There is little to no reason to kill a dog that is going after small prey (unless there are other aggression or health issues of course). If she gets along well with dogs and humans, see about getting in touch with a breed rescue- they may be able to hook her up with a new home and family. A dog like yours will do well in most non-farm homes! Not a good match as a farm dog, obviously, but it's easy enough to find a no-cats-no-chickens house-dog home in most towns and cities for a nice purebred, especially if she is healthy and friendly otherwise.
 

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Does she show any aggression towards humans? If no, then consider rehoming her (with a fee, of course) to someone who doesn't have any pets, and with no plans to get any.
And if the neighbors have pets or chickens?
 

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The dog is dangerous to smaller animals. Unless she can be completely confined, such as behind a secure fence, she will continue to kill.

I don't let my dogs roam even though I'm out in the country. The animal has proven to you that she will kill if given the opportunity, so your only options are euthing or lifetime confinement.

I'd never give an animal away who had such a high prey drive. All it takes is a neighbor's smaller pet to wander over and get mauled, for the new owners to be slapped with a lawsuit for knowingly harboring a dog that kills.
 

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Confine or muzzle. Regardless of where you live dogs shouldn't be roaming.
Don't you feel bad for the cats?
I have no ides but would removing the fangs keep it from killing small animals?
 

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I doubt she's killing the deer, just picking up pieces left by hunters, or packs of coyotes. You need to worm her for tapeworms, the deer and wild animals will infect her every time.
You said you don't have neighbors for miles, yet she has brought home chickens? That is some serious roaming and will get her shot by whatever "neighbor" she is taking those chickens from! Letting her do that is extremely rude and getting shot either kills her right off or has her wounded and suffering. If she's wandering that far, she could end up suffering for quite a while, not being able to make it home.
And really, her killing your cats doesn't bother you??:-(
With all that in mind, if you actually care about this dog you will either confine her in a kennel or in the house and have her on a leash when out; or you will rehome her. I like the idea of going through a rescue, they would have the best chance of finding her the right home.
If you did end up euthanizing her, it would be better than getting shot.
 

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I don't know if I would be comfortable rehoming. With this type of dog all it would take is one time and they will have killed another animal. I wouldn't put it past this dog to kill a small fluffy dog either. I couldn't with a good conscience rehome this dog, because if it killed someone's pet or other dog I know I could have prevented it. You can't keep a dog isolated for the rest of it's life, it's just not physically possibly. It is going to come into contact with a small animal or another dog at some point.
 

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squirrelfood--That sounds irrelevant...? It is an owner's responsibility to keep their animals on their own property, and away from the animals of others.
I've owned a dog that was aggressive towards other dogs... Which was fine, because she was always in the yard, in the house, or on a leash.

Sullys--I know this comment wasn't directed at me, but I figured I'd reply none the less :) She should definitely rehome to someone who doesn't have any other animals, with no plans to get any. There are lots of people/families who are happy with just one animal.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm not a cat person at all. They weren't my cats, they were the cants that would pick on mine. I felt bad but I dislike cat there is only one cat in the world I like and she lives in my barn in our hay.there is a farm that is a mile down the rode and they both went over to it. The guy pretty much thanked us because he got too many chickens. And that's the only thing on the he property.
 

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I don't know if I would be comfortable rehoming. With this type of dog all it would take is one time and they will have killed another animal. I wouldn't put it past this dog to kill a small fluffy dog either. I couldn't with a good conscience rehome this dog, because if it killed someone's pet or other dog I know I could have prevented it. You can't keep a dog isolated for the rest of it's life, it's just not physically possibly. It is going to come into contact with a small animal or another dog at some point.
Working in rescue as I have for years, I can tell you that dogs that are dangerous to small animals and occasionally even other dogs are not considered a liability for rehoming. ANY human aggression (provoked or not) is, but inter-animal issues are a very common thing and regularly dealt with by most reputable breed rescues, especially those for large, strong-willed breeds. They know the issues, they know the solutions, and they have a huge network of people who know how to manage dogs that don't 'get along with everything.' In fact, getting a dog that did get along with everything into rescue was a bit unusual.

Both of my dogs would happily catch and kill cats and squirrels outside, and one is also dog-aggressive, yet they live peaceably with my housecats and all dogs that I choose to introduce them to from pugs to huskies. Obviously these dogs can NEVER be allowed to roam loose, but you don't need to socially isolate them at all. You just need to keep them on a leash when out and in the house or in a well fenced yard when unsupervised. Most importantly you need to train them to behave politely in company. There is a rare dog that is irredeemably aggressive, but over 90% of the confirmed cat/chicken/squirrel/rabbit/guinea pig/bird killers I worked with and placed went on to live happy lives with happy owners. One of them actually became a police dog, which was really cool.

That is not to say you're wrong- it is a very personal decision on what you would be able to feel okay with and sleep at night after. Everyone has to do what they feel is best, and there is a risk they might go back to their old ways, especially if the new owner is not competent. Just like a bucker or kicking horse- they need strong, smart people who will maintain the right environment and discipline.
 

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Working in rescue as I have for years, I can tell you that dogs that are dangerous to small animals and occasionally even other dogs are not considered a liability for rehoming. ANY human aggression (provoked or not) is, but inter-animal issues are a very common thing and regularly dealt with by most reputable breed rescues, especially those for large, strong-willed breeds. They know the issues, they know the solutions, and they have a huge network of people who know how to manage dogs that don't 'get along with everything.' In fact, getting a dog that did get along with everything into rescue was a bit unusual.

Both of my dogs would happily catch and kill cats and squirrels outside, and one is also dog-aggressive, yet they live peaceably with my housecats and all dogs that I choose to introduce them to from pugs to huskies. Obviously these dogs can NEVER be allowed to roam loose, but you don't need to socially isolate them at all. You just need to keep them on a leash when out and in the house or in a well fenced yard when unsupervised. Most importantly you need to train them to behave politely in company. There is a rare dog that is irredeemably aggressive, but over 90% of the confirmed cat/chicken/squirrel/rabbit/guinea pig/bird killers I worked with and placed went on to live happy lives with happy owners. One of them actually became a police dog, which was really cool.

That is not to say you're wrong- it is a very personal decision on what you would be able to feel okay with and sleep at night after. Everyone has to do what they feel is best, and there is a risk they might go back to their old ways, especially if the new owner is not competent. Just like a bucker or kicking horse- they need strong, smart people who will maintain the right environment and discipline.
I have worked in rescue for 12+ years, and I rehab problem dogs for the rescues I do deal with, but thank you for taking a demeaning tone. I have worked with and helped rehome dogs like this. And I did it. No dogs that I've worked with have had any future problems. But I've seen several instances with other dogs where they went on to kill again. One even killed a long haired Chihuahua and a Yorkie. It takes a lot of work and a special home to rehome these dogs, and the amount of dogs that need it much outnumber the homes available to them.
 

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... thank you for taking a demeaning tone. I have worked with and helped rehome dogs like this...
My apologies- I really did not intend to be demeaning at all. Tone vs the internet and all that. I really do agree that euthanasia is a valid consideration and I would not blame anyone for going down that route, just like with any potentially dangerous habit (bucking, kicking, rearing, etc in a horse would rank equal in my mind) But for MY OWN part, I would not euthanize this dog without attempting to retrain and rehome first, nor would I, personally, recommend anyone else do so. Neither would I condemn them for it either. To my mind, it's just a bit of a big jump for something that might not need so final a solution. Now, if the dog had other issues the OP had shared, I might be quicker to go there.
 

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And when she decides the cat you like is next? She doesn't know or care.

Euthanasia is valid.. She's also a young active dog. Make sure she gets plenty of positive exercise. Are you home with her a lot? My GSD follows me like a shadow and wouldn't know what to do without his people around.

Until you figure out what to do you need to keep her near the house muzzled and contained.

I would NOT "rehome" a dog like this. Wayy too much risk. I would recommend contacting a breed rescue, they will be able to find a suitable home and will also be able to do regular house checks etc. Someone going to a breed rescue is not only going to need to be approved, but it's also quite likely they are experienced with the breed and with potential issues.

I know it's hard but you need to be practical. And do you really want a dog that kills things? I would be horrified if a dog of mine came home with dead animals regularly, especially cats! If she's going over to the neighbors and killing animals that puts both her and you in hot water. The neighor could easily file a complaint and the dog could be seized and then euthanized. Is that really what you want?

Either way you cannot keep this dog, unless you are willing to keep her confined/supervised and muzzled for the rest of her life and have no small animals. And I'm sorry but to be blunt, that is no life for a young healthy dog, let alone a GSD.

If you live with your parents they have every right to say she can't stay there, and it sounds like they are at that point and just being nice for your sake.
 

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You got very lucky that the neighbor your dog was killing chickens was alright with it. That is highly unusual, in my experience, and I'm 56 been in the country for 35 of those years. I have yet to meet a person that would allow that!:shock:
As a matter of fact you'd better check the laws in your area. Here, if a dog kills or maims someone's animals(s) you are liable for up to three times the value of that animal. Chickens, goats, pigs, calves.....
I repeat, if you care about that dog you will start looking for rescues. It would be incredibly selfish to put her at the risk she's in.
Not to forget about things like Rabies and other diseases. I don't care if she is vaccinated. That helps but is NOT 100%.
 

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squirrelfood--That sounds irrelevant...? It is an owner's responsibility to keep their animals on their own property, and away from the animals of others.
I've owned a dog that was aggressive towards other dogs... Which was fine, because she was always in the yard, in the house, or on a leash.

Sullys--I know this comment wasn't directed at me, but I figured I'd reply none the less :) She should definitely rehome to someone who doesn't have any other animals, with no plans to get any. There are lots of people/families who are happy with just one animal.
Yes. It is. And I do. A great many people DON'T, so it IS quite relevant. I have shot some of those dogs that weren't kept home.
 
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