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Hi everyone,

I'm not sure if I've put this in the right place and I've had a look around but I can't find the answer to a problem I have so I'm hoping for some advice.

I have 2 horses, I originally got a 2 y/o colt, he isn't like most colts and has the behaviour of a massive chilled out old gelding, he is always so willing to do things and teaching him is very easy. He is so well behaved compared to other horses around in same area. He was previous paddock with his sister and an older mare that both were bosses compared to him, and the other horses in the same assignment he instantly gets along with and he generally is passive. There is a old boss mare in assignment nearby that he even submits to that I sometimes join up to ride with.

I got a 6 month y/o filly in last few weeks and we took the colt when I picked up the filly as hes so calm and give her company on trip back and was good with her all way home. I've noticed though since when I'm around in the paddock he pins his ears most times when she gets very close to him and can sometimes lash out slightly at her. But if I try separate them, the filly goes crazy without him close and most of time he seems to enjoy/tolerate her following him around.

I thought maybe it was just settling in time, but he seems to get a little cranky if I spend time grooming her inside of him.
And more so when comes to feeding, although they have a very green paddock with heaps of grass to eat, I give him some chaff and muesli and little hay in slow feeders when I visit for little supplementing and nice extras. The only problem he gets very pushy and nipping at her during feeding, with me he will back up and wait for me to ask him forward to eat and wait for me to finish with hay before he moves in so he's got manners, but he will go and move the filly and eat her feed whenever I move off to do other things.

I've moved them far apart so to discourage this behaviour but if he finishes or likes her hay net better he will go move her off. How can I help stop this behaviour when I'm not standing nearby to keep him being a gentleman? Also is there anyway to stop his angry attitude to her if she gets a bit closer to him when its close to feeding time and hes closer to where it might be coming from or when he thinks shes getting more attention? I think sometimes I need to let them sort out the paddock dynamics, but I saw him kick back at her one day when he was in the closets corner to view me up at the top barn where I collect their feed which is about 100-200m away from where I was and I'm worried one day he might lash out and really hurt her.

Any ideas or comments appreciated.
 

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Horses don't worry or think about being gentlemen or ladies. With two horses, one will be more dominant about getting food. If it wasn't the colt, it would have been the filly pushing him around. The way many people manage this fact is by having several places to feed so the less dominant horse will be able to move to another station and continue eating every time she gets moved off a different feeder. If you need to give different types or amounts of food, you just need to separate or tie them individually until they are done eating.

Kicking and biting each other on occasion is normal horse behavior. When do you plan to geld your colt? You have about a year before the filly could possibly be bred, so otherwise they will need to be separated by then anyway. He will probably be more mellow after gelding. Two year old colts often have lots of energy.

That being said, don't be surprised if his personality or energy level changes between now and age 6 or so. Some quite spunky colts settle down at maturity and some mellow ones get feistier when they are done growing.
 

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Hi everyone,

I'm not sure if I've put this in the right place and I've had a look around but I can't find the answer to a problem I have so I'm hoping for some advice.

I have 2 horses, I originally got a 2 y/o colt, he isn't like most colts and has the behaviour of a massive chilled out old gelding, he is always so willing to do things and teaching him is very easy. He is so well behaved compared to other horses around in same area. He was previous paddock with his sister and an older mare that both were bosses compared to him, and the other horses in the same assignment he instantly gets along with and he generally is passive. There is a old boss mare in assignment nearby that he even submits to that I sometimes join up to ride with.

I got a 6 month y/o filly in last few weeks and we took the colt when I picked up the filly as hes so calm and give her company on trip back and was good with her all way home. I've noticed though since when I'm around in the paddock he pins his ears most times when she gets very close to him and can sometimes lash out slightly at her. But if I try separate them, the filly goes crazy without him close and most of time he seems to enjoy/tolerate her following him around.

I thought maybe it was just settling in time, but he seems to get a little cranky if I spend time grooming her inside of him.
And more so when comes to feeding, although they have a very green paddock with heaps of grass to eat, I give him some chaff and muesli and little hay in slow feeders when I visit for little supplementing and nice extras. The only problem he gets very pushy and nipping at her during feeding, with me he will back up and wait for me to ask him forward to eat and wait for me to finish with hay before he moves in so he's got manners, but he will go and move the filly and eat her feed whenever I move off to do other things.

I've moved them far apart so to discourage this behaviour but if he finishes or likes her hay net better he will go move her off. How can I help stop this behaviour when I'm not standing nearby to keep him being a gentleman? Also is there anyway to stop his angry attitude to her if she gets a bit closer to him when its close to feeding time and hes closer to where it might be coming from or when he thinks shes getting more attention? I think sometimes I need to let them sort out the paddock dynamics, but I saw him kick back at her one day when he was in the closets corner to view me up at the top barn where I collect their feed which is about 100-200m away from where I was and I'm worried one day he might lash out and really hurt her.

Any ideas or comments appreciated.
They're just being horses and he's letting her know he's the boss. As long as they are not kicking and biting with you in the middle of the brawl, I wouldn't worry about it, it will settle down once he's sure she's listening and respecting his place. The thing that concerns me more than anything else you said, is that you have a 2 year old COLT (implies an intact male) in with a 6 month old FILLY. If that's the case, be expecting a foal by the time she's 18 months old, or close. If he's been gelded, excellent. If not, then I would do so ASAP or I'd separate them now.
 

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Sounds like they are getting along just fine to me. The colt is just more dominant than the filly. I would separate them for feeding if they get different foods to eat (which they should be because of their age differences). If you don't have different enclosures to put them in for feeding, tie them to eat. That is of course if they tie well. As far as hay, I would put several piles for them to choose from so when the filly gets pushed off she has another pile to go to.

Also, as someone else said, if the colt is not gelded then he needs to be now or keep them separated at all times. If not, you will be having a very young horse having a baby before she is grown.
 
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Absolutely normal.

One thing I have noticed when it comes to pecking order is that the omega horse, the one at the bottom of the order will often be nastier to a new horse that is more submissive then them just because the new found position of being able to boss someone else!
This is so true. When I put my baby into the larger herd away from her mother, the two lowest horses on the totem pole chased her the most. That was until the alpha mare took her under her wing and then she was off limits again. lol
 

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My horses are the exact same way. My gelding is very dominant and the mare gets chased around. I just make sure there are enough places to eat. Eventually they will settle down. For my situation.. I find that the real problems only arise when I'm around. I've pulled up to the barn plenty of times and saw then standing very close together and eating from the same bale of hay. And then when they see me they act like they hate each other lol!!
But with any group of horses, one is going to be more dominant and it is gonna assert that dominance pretty much all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info & advice. Interesting and helpful info from foxhunter, thanks. I will either separate him/her after a month or so once she's settled in as without him in same paddock she really does crazy without him which is really weird as he has a crack at her quite frequently. (Or I will get him cut, but I wanted to just see how things progress)

I'm not too worried about feeding all the time as I've spread them really far apart and I'm there while they eat chaff/muesli, but when I leave I give them hay and he sometimes moves her off, which wouldn't be so bad if she went all way over to his but she just stands there. Not too much of a massive headache as heaps of grass to eat so not like they will be hungry, just prefer the nicer stuff of course.

I'm more concerned of his random attacks on her (I've even seen him kick out with his back legs on a few occasions for what seems very minor) and I'm not sure what to do about it as I'm worried he will seriously injury her. I contemplate separating but as above, has some detractors and prefer for them to least keep each other close, and obviously learn to get along. Be good if I can find away to work through this with training or something.
 

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I would not keep a 2year old colt with a 6 month filly. END OF STORY!!!

Too much hormones. You are BEGGING for trouble. He wants to practice fighting, bullying, herding and breeding. That is what young stallions do.
 

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I would not keep a 2year old colt with a 6 month filly. END OF STORY!!!

Too much hormones. You are BEGGING for trouble. He wants to practice fighting, bullying, herding and breeding. That is what young stallions do.
^^^^^^^
That!
Yes, horses find their own pecking order, but you DO NOT put fillies in with un gelded colts!
 
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