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Well, no professional development course (equine or otherwise) will ever guarantee you that you will actually be good at what you do afterwards. There are too many other factors that play into it - practice, character, talent, discipline, the ability to apply what you learned for example. So I don't think Pat Parelli is to blame entirely for people who take his courses and still don't know how to train a horse afterwards.

Who knows why he increased the requirements for being a Parelli certified trainer. It might be that he is just trying to make more money. It might be that he is seeing a problem with too many trainers that advertise with his name and aren't actually all that good.
I personally think it would be a lot fairer if he made the admission requirements more stringent rather than making people take his expensive courses and then telling them afterwards "sorry, changed my mind, you're not good enough after all".
What's important though is that he fulfills his end of the contract and that he delivers what he promises. If he promises that after x number of courses you'll be able to advertise yourself using his name, then that is what you should be able to do.
 

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Back in the day guys like Parelli were called "Snake-Oil Salesmen." Self-proclaimed horse-training gurus make a fortune from gullible horse owners. Most of the programs are gimmicks or just variations of centuries-old horse conditioning techniques wrapped up in new paper and given a jazzy name.

They want you to think they've invented something new...and trust me, we humans have been training horses to ride for going on six-thousand years and there ain't nothing new. They'd like you to think that everybody before them--the Parthians, the Greeks, the Arabs, the Mongols, the great European national studs didn't know a **** thing about conditioning horses until they--Mr Parelli, Monty the "Horse Whisperer" et al--came along to show everybody how it's supposed to be done.

I drove by a neighbor's pasture some years ago and saw him walking along in front of his horse, flapping his arms like a duck and bobbing his head up and down. I pulled over and said, "Jim, what the h*ll are you doing?" He said, "It's Parelli. I'm training the horse."
 

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Once upon a time, many years ago, PP was a decent horse hand. Had a nice little wife and a nice little life. Never went without work with horses of some kind.

Not sure how someone gets to thinking all their ideas are good ones, but that seems to have happened to him.

Bottom line, I'm glad he gets people off the sofa and out with the horses they are scared of. But I won't let a Parelli-ite on my place. Takes the rider, for those that actually ride, too long to get on. My horse and I have got a 1/4 of our day done and they are still getting themselves psyched up with some voodoo/superstitious routine the "snake oil salesman" sold them.
 

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I usually worry about anyone who trains with a "program". Every horse is different. If trainers listen to the horse, instead of consulting some card, or book in their pocket, or video, that is how a horse gets trained.

I admit, I lost about $400 to PP the first time I saw him.....I felt like I had been hypnotized, and walked into the arena and handed over my cc! I did get a good halter and lead rope out of the deal. I read the book, but got annoyed with the alliteration.

I am sorry you could not get out before they got so much of your money and time.
 

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The lady who trained our horses originally started out as an XXX trainer. I think it was John Lyons, but I'm not sure. I don't even know if John Lyons did that stuff. In any case, as she trained more horses and built up a reputation, she stopped calling herself an XXX certified trainer. She has continued to take lessons in training from other people, has now trained a lot more horses and seen a lot of problems and had to experiment with different approaches to find the one that worked on the individual horse. I think she now runs about a 3-4 month waiting period for accepting a horse - simply has more business coming her way than time and facilities to handle the demand.

If someone told me they started using Parelli's system and then branched out as they worked with more horses, to the point they no longer considered themselves a "Parelli Trainer" and were no longer licensed to claim it, that would increase my chance of hiring them. Around here, being an "ex-Parelli trainer" might bring in more customers. OTOH, if someone advertised themselves as a "Parelli 4 Level" (or whatever it is called), I'd avoid them like the plague.
 

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Maybe the OP's business will improve without the Parelli name, maybe it won't. Time will tell about that, but, in a way, that's not the point. True, the OP has whatever knowledge and experience s/he may have gained, and that can not be taken away, but s/he paid a pile of money for the certification, and I am astonished that it can be taken away.

I have an high school degree, a college degree, some post-graduate degrees and certifications, and put a lot of time, money and work into them. I would be outraged if my High School voided my diploma if I didn't go on to college, or if my old Alma Mater revoked my diploma because I failed to continue to take courses with them, or my art school canceled my certificate because I haven't produced any great art. I earned it, it's mine!

I can see them adding stuff on for additional courses, like First Level Parelli Instructor, BB (Black Belt) or LSX (Lead Snapper Excellent), but to yank it? No way.

This sounds like some kind of extortion to me.
 

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There are a number of areas where continuing education is required: nursing, preparing taxes, legal fields, etc. In a case like this, it would all depend on the contract - which none of us but the OP has seen. There is this statement on his website:

"Staying updated is an important part of being a Licensed Parelli Professional."

What is a Parelli Professional? | Parelli Professionals
 

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There are a number of areas where continuing education is required: nursing, preparing taxes, legal fields, etc. In a case like this, it would all depend on the contract - which none of us but the OP has seen. There is this statement on his website:

"Staying updated is an important part of being a Licensed Parelli Professional."

What is a Parelli Professional? | Parelli Professionals
The occupations mentioned have continuing education not only because the States require it but because things change, new things are added & the things you seldom use get forgotten. I'm not sure any of that applies to horse training. I mean if you're training a horse you're training a horse & any changes will be dictated by the horse, not a program.
 

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These type of trainers are in doing what they do for two things.. money and fame.

That is their priority.
I agree. They *may* actually be good horsemen, but they are certainly even better businessmen.
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There are a number of areas where continuing education is required: nursing, preparing taxes, legal fields, etc. In a case like this, it would all depend on the contract - which none of us but the OP has seen. There is this statement on his website:

"Staying updated is an important part of being a Licensed Parelli Professional."

What is a Parelli Professional? | Parelli Professionals
Yeah, that is true. But horse training? I have to get a physical every five years to maintain my Captain's license; but they only issue it for five years; it has an absolute expiration date.

But when I worked as a child psychologist, I could have hung out a shingle and practiced forever without any further education. Might not have been smart, but I could have done it. But because I worked with a medical institute, the hospital required us to attend periodic trainings, but they couldn't have yanked my degree. They might have fired me for non-participation, but I still could be self-employed with my degree. I might have starved ....
 

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These type of trainers are in doing what they do for two things.. money and fame.
Well, as my dear old philosophy professor used to ask, compared to what? I suppose none of the trainers on this forum train for money. Doing a lot of horses for free, are we? Donating half our time to working with rescues?

The real difference between "these type of trainers" and the rest of us is they are wildly successful. From what I know of the Parellis, Clinton Anderson, Julie Goodnight, Chris Cox, Monte Roberts, Dean Winters, Stacy Westfall, Charles Wilhelm, Mark Rashid, John Lyons, Josh Lyons, Craig Cameron, Buck Brannaman, Ken McNabb, and I have met and talked to several of them, they love horses just like the rest of us. Some of them are ambitious workaholics with motors that never stop, so of course they make more money than normal people with the same ability.

And when a horse owner makes enough progress with her own horse to go from being afraid to ride to enjoying her horse again, of course she will have loyalty to the person and program that made the difference.

All the people I know who have any wealth got there by being more gifted, harder working, and willing to take on more risk than me, whether they are business executives, horse trainers or construction contractors. I don't begrudge them the fruit of their efforts, and I find it irritating when others do.

The Parellis are a special case. Somewhere along the line, Pat Parelli, horse trainer became Pat Parelli incorporated, and decision making started being divided up between way too many people. I think Parelli, Inc. has helped create the polarization that Zexious mentions with some stupid decisions.

For example, back around 2008, shortly after Parelli, Inc. came up with the "horsenality chart" they entered an agreement with Myler bits to offer the right bit for every horsenality. They have since backed off. Whose idea was that, and how did it get approved? The goofy idea followed by the reversal gave the impression that decision making was out of control. I suspect the same thing led to the issue of the OP of this thread. It certainly isn't doing Parelli any good to have hundreds of angry former certified trainers out their bad mouthing him.

But just because Parelli didn't think through his certification program very well before he started it doesn't make any greedier than the rest of us.
 

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I do understand the frustration. I also think it is a good idea to follow bsms' advice and get a lawyer's opinion. However, I would NOT get myself into an expensive legal battle.
What I would ask myself is, regardless of whether you still call yourself a Parelli-certified instructor or not, do you have the feeling those courses were worth what you paid for them? Do you feel like you have learnt enough about horse training for your time and money to be worthwile? Or do you NEED to be a Parelli-certified instructor for business purposes?

In the end - at least to me - what it comes down to when I take a clinic or course is "have I improved the relatioship with my horse / my riding / my skills as a horse trainer / my knowledge about the specific topic?". I don't mind paying for a big name, as long as it reflects the quality of training. I do mind paying for a big name for the sake of the name though.

Of course, that's a little bit different for professional training, but you don't need a license for being a horse trainer. So really, the only thing at stake is whether you can use his name for advertising your own services.
I agree that what you describe sounds like a scheme to make more money for Mr. Parelli. But obviously you were quite happy with what you learned in those courses, so even if you can't call yourself a Parelli horse trainer anymore, move on and use the knowledge that you have gained to train horses. That's what it's all about, no?
Regula has a good point here. There are people other than myself that would cringe if the trainer I was considering told me that they were a strict follower of Parelli (or C.A. or anyone else) If you can train and get good results you can build your reputation on that. For those who like Parelli, you can say that you have studied under him. That would not be a breach of contract.
 

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Yeah, that is true. But horse training? I have to get a physical every five years to maintain my Captain's license; but they only issue it for five years; it has an absolute expiration date...
I'm not a Parelli fan, but he would have every right to insist that someone using his name needed to do XYZ to make sure that person was still training IAW what Parelli is currently doing. I've heard Parelli made some sense some years back, and has changed his approach to a more Linda-centric style. I don't think Parelli started out teaching 'The Game of Contact". He had to wait for Linda to discover riding with contact first...:shock:

If someone licenses you to use their name, they have every right to insist you must do XYZ to continue using their name. You become sort of like a franchise, and you can bet McDonald's requires their franchises to offer their current product line. I wish McDonalds had stuck to burgers and fries cooked in fat, but they didn't and a franchise that tried to offer their old menu would get in deep doo-doo.

Parelli also has a "menu". He has the right, if it is written into the contract, to insist his Mini-Parellis teach the same stuff he does now.
 

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I look at this way, Parrelli and the rest of them, made a name using concepts that have been used for years. Some business man decided, hey I can make some $$$ putting it on video and getting followeres etc etc, Name brand.. blah blah
If I went to a trainer and all they could say was they trained parelli et al.. and could not say I trained and competed and won this or that.. I would walk away with my money and find a
trainer that could stand on their own rep.
 

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Go back to when these trainers were first starting out and they had no gimmicks at all, no carrot stick or dually halters, nothing but their experience, tack and a rope.

I am not against anyone making money, working with animals is hard work and generally renumeration small. If there is a market for people buying their so called necessary products, DVDs et al then that is just business sense.

If these people offer 'qualifications' then the rules shouldn't be changed to bring in more money and disqualify those with the papers to say they are qualified just because the rules have altered.

Heck, I took my English horse exams some forty years ago for the last ones. I haven't been a member of the BHS for a good 35 years yet I still hold those qualifications even though the whole structure of the exams have changed a lot.
I will add that I have never had any use for them!
 

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If these people offer 'qualifications' then the rules shouldn't be changed to bring in more money and disqualify those with the papers to say they are qualified just because the rules have altered.
I'm still waiting for the OP to respond to my question about exactly what she needed to do to maintain her qualification. She didn't say they asked her for any more money.
 

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All the people I know who have any wealth got there by being more gifted, harder working, and willing to take on more risk than me, whether they are business executives, horse trainers or construction contractors. I don't begrudge them the fruit of their efforts, and I find it irritating when others do.
We have the same irritant. A corollary is those who complain about the advertisements in the TV shows (complainers, hit your fast forward button!) because without lots of ads, there would be no show.
 
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