The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! Ever since I started riding I have always wanted to Jump. But the closest lesson barn is over 2 hours away.
Is there a way to learn how without going to a lesson barn? I have a horse who have jumped some before. In my area everyone mostly rides Western and Barrel Races...
What should I do??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,439 Posts
You can learn to jump from reading books and practicing with your friends . . . but you won't be a show jumper. You will just be able to jump. To be a show jumper, you are going to need lessons. Perhaps you can video yourself and send it to an instructor. I can see that working . . . for a little while. I think to be a serious jumper, you will need real lessons with real instructors.

I learned to jump from reading books, and I got along fine. I didn't do all that well at horse shows . . . and I knew why. I knew I needed real instruction to compete against the kids who were getting weekly or twice weekly lessons. I knew I was just lucky to have a horse at all. I wanted to horse show, and I did, but I was never going to be top notch. I was lucky to have what I had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
All horses can jump but it's a matter of should they and is the rider prepared. This is why, as posted above you shouldn't jump alone. Jumping makes riding much more dangerous. That aside, I don't think the OP was saying she wanted to be a show jumper. Perhaps just the freedom of being able to jump on a horse. You can build your own little cross rails if you want to start and you have your own horses to gradually get them accustomed--if that's what you want to do. But not alone. Have a spotter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
There really isn't a good way to properly learn jumping without an experienced person to watch you and give you pointers. For now, you can read books, watch YouTube, trot without stirrups on a lunge a LOT, practice your 2-point position, and learn as much as you can. BUT the problem with all of that is...you might be doing something incorrectly and not even know it. And by that time, you've developed a 'bad habit' that will be harder to break because you've practiced it instead of having it corrected immediately.

For now, the best thing you can do is practice dressage and flatwork - learn how to collect, control speed and tune into your balance. It's good (if not essential) preparation for both you and the horse.

Consider having the instructor come to you?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top