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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You guys know I'm taking baby steps. Well, this evening to tomorrow morning a strong cold front is coming through, and it's supposed to be super windy, with winds averaging around 20 mph and gusts up to 40mph.

I was going to bring the trailer home from the barn today and work on driving it around tomorrow. Two questions:
  1. I've driven it in light winds; is 20-40 mph wins too big of a step up, for someone who likes small steps?
  2. Really, as long as you're driving slowly, the wind shouldn't be a problem, right? So, maybe I might decide to drive the trailer around streets where I could go 40 mph but not take it on the highway (65 mph) unless I was feeling pretty confident?
  3. Oops, I guess a third question -- any tips for driving the trailer in the wind, aside from taking it slowly?
What do you guys think?
 

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How comfortable were you in light winds? How did your trailer react? Stronger winds will multiply that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think we had gusts up to 15 mph and I was startled. The trailer got pushed a tiny bit, but in retrospect I think that it was probably even less than I thought. It was the first time it had moved on me and that was definitely different. I applied the trailer brakes and it was fine after that.

This was on the highway at about 65 mph.
 

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Why are you doing this to yourself......:unsure:
If you don't drive this in all weather conditions you will never learn how.
You're smart enough to know to pull over and gather yourself together if you get rattled behind the wheel...
Go drive and just drive, stop over-thinking every detail, cause you can't.
Drive it, experience it and learn how to handle it...
You're referring to low-speed on roads that are buffered by buildings, homes, trees and such as secondary roads are.
You will feel a few, some "butts" of wind force, but don't you driving your put-put car in windy conditions?
Do you go to over-thinking how do I get home cause of it?
If it rains do you fall apart behind the wheel?
I don't think so, you slide in the car, buckle up and drive with a bit more caution is very common for most...
Your truck and trailer are no different....get out and drive it, experience it and become comfortable in your skin as you deal & cope with what you face thrown at you.
And indeed, take it to the highway and drive at speed cause again, if you don't get some confidence in you & those abilities you will never conquer and be able to do this drive across country as you wish...you need to think on your feet not plan every breath you take...
Its time to have more faith in you and your capable abilities....
Everything you have faced you have mastered and conquered with no issue...
You've psyched yourself out several times over-thinking....don't do it this time.
Hook up, take it home and go drive it cause the more behind the wheel time you have the more confident you become in what you can do. Truth!
🐴... jmo...
 

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I think you would be better off waiting untill Sunday to work on your pulling the trailer, I would just bring it home and just see how Saturday go's, but with all the wind that's coming with this cold front on Saturday its sure is not going to be a fun day, I'm in South/Central Texas (Guadalupe county) and when a windy front comes in I just hate going out side with all the wind. With wind gusts over 40 mph to 50 mph its going to be a tough day, even Truckers hate that type of wind. Good Luck
 

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Ok - here is what you do... You squeeze your butt-cheeks and you drive it in the wind!

Seriously though -
I have driven mine in most weather but I do try to make my husband drive it whenever he is around. He has all the CDL qualifications and years of experience from driving concrete pumps and firetrucks to driving huge government responses vehicles. SO while I can tell you what you need to do, I will admit - I use my husband as much as possible.

I think you should bring your trailer home and do a little practicing with it. Remember - a loaded trailer does not haul the same as an empty one...I have a feeling where you are going to be like me and while you will be perfectly capable and do a fine job, you are always going to be just that little bit of nervous. There is nothing wrong with cautious driving though....

I think my post provided zero help... sorry...
 

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Also remember that a loaded trailer handles differently than an empty trailer. I am going to be brutally honest and say I think you are way over thinking this. It seems to be causing more anxiety for you than it should. If you are a cautious driver (and it sounds like you are) then you will be fine pulling the trailer. My thought is that you should only drive your trailer when going to ride - and then ride for an hour or more and then load and go home. Go out and ride as often as you can and in the next 2-3 years you will have gained the experience pulling your trailer you need. You have a couple of years before your move and cross country trip, in that couple of years there could be many many trail riding adventures that help you become more and more comfortable pulling your trailer. There is no need to fabricate driving experiences just for "practice"
 

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Agree with many things posted above, expecially @carshon.

When we got our horses my husband was familiar with driving trailers (boats/cargo/car dolly) and I had never towed anything in my life. He drove most of the time until I started endurance in 2018 and started wanting to go meet up with friends and go to rides without him so I hooked up, loaded up and went. The best learning trip for me was when I decided to load up my mare and a bunch of gear and drive 6 hours to a ride in upper Wisconsin all by myself. We made it just fine!

The only time I "practice" (no horses or not actually hauling the trailer for a purpose) is backing around the house because I still need work on that. Although most of my practice is making DH get me any time he needs to move the trailer and not to do it himself.

Last weekend I offered to drive home from the park and I watched the truck in front of me (no trailer) slide off the road into the ditch as they pulled out of the lot. I wanted to make DH switch with me and he told me no and that as long as I went slow I would be fine. So I held my breath and crawled out of the parking lot as slow as possible past the truck in the ditch and didn't even notice it being slippery.

Don't overthink it, just do! Bring the horses, explore new trails. Then it's not a chore (practice driving) but a fun experience (trail riding!)
 

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Your way over thinking it it's really not a big deal. Slow down an take your time you'll be fine.

I've hauled in windy snowy conditions slippery roads. I was by myself hauling ice home from a vet appointment. It was white knuckle driving but I did it. Took me 5 hours to get home fastest I went was 40 mph, there were time I only went 35 mph.. Normally it was a 2 hour drive on bare roads.

I had the radio on, truck in 4 wheel drive an just took a deep breath and told myself you'll be fine!! Had my cell phone so if I had trouble I could call for help.

Wasn't my plan to drive in that horrible weather had to deal with it. Came out of vet clinic an it was snowing like crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well I guess the front is coming through sooner than they thought, because the winds were 10-20 mph when I drove home from the barn, on the highway including the elevated parts, and the trailer didn't sway at all. It was a little wiggly here and there, but I realize now that that is different from sway.

It is also probably a little tongue heavy, as it's empty except for the full water tank and two bales of hay in the front.

I have ordered a trailer tongue weight scale!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It doesn't help that I have seen terrible videos of trailer sway and the resulting horrifying crashes.
 

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It doesn't help that I have seen terrible videos of trailer sway and the resulting horrifying crashes.
May I strongly suggest you stop watching those kinds of videos.
To be extra safe, extra protected... that is why you went for the added expenses of weight distribution hitch, anti-sway bars to start with and have added a few more "toys" since then.
There is a saying by me that you can be insurance poor....getting everything and then some more to cover your butt..
The bottom line though is you can over-do too.
At this point, you are teetering if not started on that slope downward trying "to be safe"...there is a point in time you become over-safe if you can believe that cause you freak your mind out....

So... I do have to ask...
A water tank in trailer front and 2 bales of hay... and you think you are "tongue-heavy"???
How many gallons does that tank hold? 30? 50? or 100? Water is 7 pounds per gallon = 700 pounds at most.
Hay bales unless you have extra large wire support bales.... 50 pounds is what most hope to have.
2x 50 = 100 pounds for hay...
I'm sorry but I think you enjoy making yourself sick with worry, over-thinking and dissecting stuff that isn't truly relevant to many scenarios of "it might...."
You bought a truck that is made to tow how many thousands of pounds? 10,000 + isn't it?
You are towing a empty trailer around town fretting about being to much weight on the tongue??? :cautious:

Here, some easily explained & written so you can understand...

Tongue load should be 10 to 15 percent of the trailer's total weight—if you're towing 5,000 pounds, the tongue weight would be 500 to 750 pounds. Typically, if your truck is rated high enough to handle the trailer you're towing, it should also be rated high enough to handle the weight the trailer puts on the hitch.

Let me remind you you are not a "conventional hitch but are a weight distribution hitch and equalizer bars.
No matter what brand, Ford, Chevy or Ram....you are not over-weight on the tongue.
You have all the specifications of your truck and your trailer....
250/2500 series HD truck...
Tongue weight is please see the above in red .....
I didn't make this stuff up.

I googled it so it was from reputable, reliable resources since you fret so much...
Consumer Reports, gmc.com, news.pickuptrucks.com, chevrolet.com, kbb.com, readingtruck.com and there are a ton more...

I promise you your 800 pounds or so tongue weight on your 250/2500 series HD truck with weight distribution hitch and equalizer bars on a empty trailer but instead a water tank and 2 bales of hay is not a problem and it will not be a problem when you put your 2 horses who each weigh less than a 1,000 pounds aboard with that extra either..
You need to remember you up-sized everything on this trailer by buying a warmblood trailer then upping the amounts it could handle with customizing. Your trailer is made to carry more so your tongue weight capacity just went up in amount it is designed to have...
Your trailer is balance designed not some homemade horror of junk...
You have a brand new trailer with the best of the best and safest built into it.
Unless I miss my guess, think you could place about 1,500 where you have it now and your truck will laugh at you if it could talk....this is all you got???

Please stop making yourself such a wreck....honest, you do not need to do this to yourself, you don't.

🐴....
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You are towing a empty trailer around town fretting about being to much weight on the tongue???
Oh, no, I didn't mean like I was WORRIED about it. I can't imagine that this trailer could ever put too much tongue weight on the truck. I just meant that having more tongue weight can reduce sway, so maybe that's why it went so well today, even with the wind.
 

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Oh, no, I didn't mean like I was WORRIED about it. I can't imagine that this trailer could ever put too much tongue weight on the truck. I just meant that having more tongue weight can reduce sway, so maybe that's why it went so well today, even with the wind.
How big of a trailer and size of your truck? Just curious, I'm been hauling horses and cattle for most of my life so I have lots of experience with hauling under all kinds of conditions of weather. I"m just thinking since you are not experience taking it slow would be a good ideal and I think you are on the right track, slow and easy untill you get some more driving time. Hauling in high wind with a empty trailer can be tricky if you have a light trailer, and especially a two horse tad along. I always had Goosenecks as they are no problem empty are loaded. Just be carefull tomorrow, its going to be a hum-dinger for sure. And it sounds like you got this (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Trailer is a 2h BP walk-through style with side ramp and front tack area, weighs 4k empty, maxes out at 7500 pounds. It's 20 feet long total length. Truck is a 2017 F-250 with towing package; gas engine, 160" wheelbase. I'm using a WD hitch.
 

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Trailer is a 2h BP walk-through style with side ramp and front tack area, weighs 4k empty, maxes out at 7500 pounds. It's 20 feet long total length. Truck is a 2017 F-250 with towing package; gas engine, 160" wheelbase. I'm using a WD hitch.
Sounds like you got all the bases covered. You just do what is comfortable for you in hauling your trailer. LOL,Just stay away from the videos, those would make anybody sweat, lol..:eek:
 

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You guys know I'm taking baby steps. Well, this evening to tomorrow morning a strong cold front is coming through, and it's supposed to be super windy, with winds averaging around 20 mph and gusts up to 40mph.

I was going to bring the trailer home from the barn today and work on driving it around tomorrow. Two questions:
  1. I've driven it in light winds; is 20-40 mph wins too big of a step up, for someone who likes small steps?
  2. Really, as long as you're driving slowly, the wind shouldn't be a problem, right? So, maybe I might decide to drive the trailer around streets where I could go 40 mph but not take it on the highway (65 mph) unless I was feeling pretty confident?
  3. Oops, I guess a third question -- any tips for driving the trailer in the wind, aside from taking it slowly?
What do you guys think?
Go find yourself an open parking lot and practice driving against the wind first, then with the wind 2nd. If the winds aren't too big (40 mph is too big for this next one) drive across the wind. 40 mph and up could flip an empty trailer. I'd think twice about hauling my gooseneck in 40 mph winds, if it was empty. Put 4 horses, tack and stuff for a weekend show in it and it would probably be ok.

Remember that it isn't just the wind strength, it's the high profile of the vehicle and trailer that can make things get out of hand. In a big, empty parking lot, you shouldn't have a bunch of trouble. And you won't get people aggravated if you decide to chicken out (which is no bad thing) and just quit until the wind dies down.
 

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It doesn't help that I have seen terrible videos of trailer sway and the resulting horrifying crashes.
I agree with not watching this stuff and try to get out the habit of thinking about it. Easier said than done of course. I found that thinking about optimistic outcomes just as bad and it was better to not think about it at all or just about something else. Honestly I wouldn't like the thought of driving an empty trailer and really how often are you genuinely gonna be driving an empty trailer? This is one of those times I'd stick to practicing what you're actually gonna do which is hauling horses. By the time you have to drive an empty trailer in windy conditions you'd have a good feel of what's normal. I would MUCH RATHER drive a loaded box and get in good habits of braking and gear shifts than be used to an empty one and not adjust accordingly in time for that roundabout or hill. Seriously, what a difference. If I were you, and I think you're braver than me, I'd have been taking two horses out with your daughter, taking tack just in case you feel good but with the aim of unloading, letting them graze a bit, then going home. You don't have to ride, maybe you just tack up and let them graze. You could do that in less than an hour. Make things as easy for you and forget about fancy manoeuvres and parking perfect if you can. You've got enough practice by now that I reckon in a bind you can do what's needed even if it takes you 30mins and getting out to check repeatedly and for others to judge :rolleyes: I've been there - parking a van in central London is a nightmare. Getting out can be just as bad. Next time you're at the yard load a horse and go around the block.

C'mon ACinATX you got this. You're so close you just need that push :p I don't have anyone beyond this forum to give me that push which is why I pay my instructor and told her to do just that :ROFLMAO: The bonus of my hiring a box that first time was that I only had it for the morning so I had to get my money's worth. I am envisioning future posts of your trail rides! :giggle:
 
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