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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Have you tried a Billy Allen bit?
Independent sides, stabilized center not a nutcracker action...
Wonder if this might be more comfortable for the horse?
You know, I had never heard of a Billy allen bit until now. But upon looking at your pictures, my bit is 100% a billy allen bit! I got it used and had no idea the original make, but the mouthpiece was slightly too thick and there was way more copper inlay than the myler bits usually have, so I never gave it much thought other than a mystery knockoff myler. He loved it, so who was I to question it?

I'll have to get a picture of it tomorrow to confirm it's identity, since it is a full cheek. But the copper inlay and the shape of the mouthpiece looks identical.

And as much as people say I should ignore the barn gossips, they can be vicious... I'm sure you all know that! If I get my hands on a drop and he doesn't like it as much as his kineton, I probably will just stick with my kineton and put my flame suit on when I ride.
 

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I think a kineton is a great solution and not necessarily harsh at all. It can be helpful in distributing pressure, which can mean less pressure in a single area.
 

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A noseband is a way to force the mouth shut and does not address the real issue. Could it be that your horse has a very low palate? Your equine dentist could confirm this. Forcing your horses mouth on a bit that obviously has him worried seems cruel. I know this may not be a popular opinion but I think your horse would be happier if you found the root of its concern and did not just assume that it is being difficult.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
A noseband is a way to force the mouth shut and does not address the real issue. Could it be that your horse has a very low palate? Your equine dentist could confirm this. Forcing your horses mouth on a bit that obviously has him worried seems cruel. I know this may not be a popular opinion but I think your horse would be happier if you found the root of its concern and did not just assume that it is being difficult.
His teeth were done about a month ago, and the dentist mentioned that his mouth seemed ordinary is just about every way, except for a somewhat fleshy tongue which is apparently common in the quarter horses she sees.

Like I've said before, he's not obviously uncomfortable and fighting this bit. I've used bits where he was so miserable that all he would do was snake his neck around and gape (the only time he's ever bucked was due to not getting on with a bit) so his quiet acceptance of his current bit is a world of difference.

With this bit, he will accept contact and happily move forward without any gaping. He will quietly chew and suck on his bit if he's thinking, but will on the rare occasion get unsettled if I fumble the driving lines or reins.

I'm still working on my balance since my injury. I'm not back to where I was, but I'm a lot better. I absolutely do NOT want to bop my horse in the mouth if I screw up and lose my balance. Wouldn't a drop noseband at least help keep the bit from banging on the molars should that happen?

I know riding in a kineton sure helped, and it helped a ton during training when I was transitioning from riding in a flat halter to riding in a bit. But now that I've moved to a new place where kinetons are vilified, I need to get with the times apparently.

I just might be a horse abuser either way, but it seems like everyone is a horse abuser these days.
 

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How does a drop nose band keep the bit off the molars? I'm confused about that. the drop noseband goes in front of the bit, so it doesn't form any barrier between teh bit and the molars.
 

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How does a drop nose band keep the bit off the molars? I'm confused about that. the drop noseband goes in front of the bit, so it doesn't form any barrier between teh bit and the molars.
It's the side of the mouth. A regular french cavasson will run along the side of their face and if adjusted tighter or the cheeks are fleshier in addition to sharper edges, the noseband can cause discomfort there. With a drop noseband there is no pressure along the side of the face. Nothing to do with the bit. Figure 8s, Micklems, and other anatomical nosebands offer the same relief.
1113034
 

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@ApuetsoT
I can see that the drop noseband ( regardless of the bit itself), puts less pressure on the molars than a traditional noseband, but not less than NO noseband, and how would it keep the BIT from banging into the molars, as in the OP's concern if or when she lost her balance and accidently bumped the reins.?
 

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@ApuetsoT
I can see that the drop noseband ( regardless of the bit itself), puts less pressure on the molars than a traditional noseband, but not less than NO noseband, and how would it keep the BIT from banging into the molars, as in the OP's concern if or when she lost her balance and accidently bumped the reins.?
Oh, I missed in OPs last post where she mention that. Thought you were referring to the comment to made earlier about the drop and molars.

No, a drop isnt going to do much against a pop in the mouth. A kinton might.
 
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