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Discussion Starter #21
I used to use dry cornstarch for grass stains. I never tried it on urine/manure stains.

If it doesn't work, cornstarch makes great gravy:) :)
I tried cornstarch and was brushing it out of his coat for days after. The stuff is just too fine and Harley's coat is so thick. Might work on a summer coat, but it was a mess when I tried it on him. Too bad, that would have been a cheaper solution!
 

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Just went out to check on the horses. Harley must have been reading my mind and rolled in the mud just to spite me. Mud from head to tail - both sides! all the way up his neck and on his cheeks!

Honestly though, mud comes off with enough grooming. Manure and urine, on the other hand, do not.
I'm liking this because my mare is the only one of 12 in the herd that will roll completely in the mud and look like she went swimming in it. In her mane, on her halter, all over her face. All the horses will be clean but her. She can find the one and only mudhole in the pasture.

At least I am not the only one!
 

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Oh no Whinnie, definitely not alone. Isabel will make sure to rub her face all in the mud so it's caked in her eyelids.

She's bay, so I don't have to deal with coat stains. I think if she was a lighter color I'd just curry them out as best I could, and otherwise they'd be with her until the summer. No baths here in New Hampshire over the winter. We had our first inch of snow here last night!
 

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I wonder if dry baking soda would help with the stains? Rub it in, brush it out, use a damp rag to get the rest out. Mild on skin. Works on dogs.
 

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I used to use dry cornstarch for grass stains. I never tried it on urine/manure stains.

If it doesn't work, cornstarch makes great gravy:) :)

Now that's frugal! I never thought of re-using cornstarch like that. Thank goodness you've never used it on urine/manure stains: that gravy might not be quite as tasty. :rofl:

Sorry. Just the image of carefully brushing the cornstarch out of the coat and carrying it into the kitchen.... cracked me up!
 

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^^^Well ----- I didn't take it that far ---- I meant what was left in the box, lollolllol

It probably is a good thing I didn't think about re-using what was on the horse------:shock:
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Hey maybe this picture will make you feel better about your dirty horse. :lol: I just let him romp in the indoor one day after a ride...
Hahaha... that reminds me I need to brush Kodak! Harley looks worse but Kodak's beautiful bay coat is starting to look pretty dusty!

Last winter our BO let the horses use the indoor as a turnout shelter. Sounds like a good idea in theory, but far too dusty for Harley, full of pigeons, and man, that sand could make a mess on his coat! I always knew where he rolled during shedding season because there'd be a mess of white hairs left behind!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Well it's not as bad as it looks...just sand/lime(whatever the indoor footing is) and it brushed right off. Pee stains are way worse! I just thought it was funny that he rolled while all sweaty and then didn't shake when he stood up!
Yes, that dust usually comes right off... Unless of course you just gave them a bath and made the newbie mistake of turning them out wet. THAT will lead to immediate and semi-permanent stains, guaranteed! I once bathed Harley before a show and after a few minutes in turnout, I actually had to hose him down again. Harley: 1, me: 0. Lesson learned.
 

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White horses might show spots here and there, but OMG! Just got my first BLACK horse this year and he's IMPOSSIBLE to keep clean. Of course, he also has to wallow in any mud he can find. I wash him, let him dry, rub my hand across his coat and.... dust. GAH!

I have decided my favorite color on a horse, at least here in red-clay-Alabama, is buckskin/grulla. My mare is the same color, clean or dirty! LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
White horses might show spots here and there, but OMG! Just got my first BLACK horse this year and he's IMPOSSIBLE to keep clean. Of course, he also has to wallow in any mud he can find. I wash him, let him dry, rub my hand across his coat and.... dust. GAH!

I have decided my favorite color on a horse, at least here in red-clay-Alabama, is buckskin/grulla. My mare is the same color, clean or dirty! LOL.
LOL, well, if they're anything like cars, that totally makes sense. I used to have a black car and it was IMPOSSIBLE to keep clean. Mind you, I live in a cold climate where salt is sprayed on the roads all winter long, so my black car was almost never black. I now drive a white car, and while I hesitated to buy it, it's WAY easier to keep clean than my black car was!
 

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I have a loud patterned paint horse and he invariably gets grass, pee, and poo stains. A very inexpensive solution is green rubbing alcohol. I don't know why it works or why it has to be the green... but it does! It is one of those handy little horse tricks I have picked up a long the way.
I 2nd alcohol. I pour it into it in a spray bottle and use a towel to rub the spot off. It is much less expensive than any of the commercial products.
 
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