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Flagging tape, hot pink or orange every so often so horse sees where fence is at is a good idea.

And if horse is TB? I would not do it as they do not do well with it, tend to get shocked, panic and run through it.
Yes, I was going to pick up some of that tape just to make sure she sees it well. No it is not a TB, she is approx. 8-9 months old but she has been in a pasture with electric fencing before and she was fine with it and she is respectful of the fence(not going to say something wouldn't happen as it seems that horses are always gettting into some freak accidents).
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thanks for the diagram that makes since now that you explained it. I will most definantly be reading some more before I set it up.


My 2 cents:
Grounding rod: Use stainless steel for best effect, at least 2 feet long. The deeper it is the better the circuit created. If it is really dry where you are, put a water bucket near the ground rod and when you top up the bucket, let it overflow and soak the ground where the rod is. Ensure the rod is away from where a horse could reach it.

Sagging tape: tape is not supposed to be tight; it should be slack enough that you can see it move in a bit more than a light breeze.

Alumunimum wire: I agree. That stuff is a waste of money and my valuable time. Go with tape or rope.

# of strands: depends on the horse, training of the horse (they have to learn about it first), number of horses and size variety. I use only one strand like PHM - a mix of two different kinds of tape and rope. I can't always get the same stuff where I live, so I just mix it up as I need it.

Posts: t-posts for corners and rods for support in between. I can't find long enough rods where I live, so I go to the steel supplier and ask them to cut up some 3/8" hotroll into approx. 5 foot lengths. The ones at the farm store only came up to my horse's chest after I put them in the ground. Sink your t-posts nice and deep with a postsetter (MDH made me one) or a sledgehammer. The rods you can put in with a framing hammer.

Charger: I agree, don't cheap out. I have a battery powered one so I can take it with me when I go camping or to a friends. I bought a trickle charger for it that I connect to the battery when it's running low. I used to use truck batteries because we had lots of them around, but now I use a marine battery. A regular car battery doesn't stand up well to frequent charging/discharging.

A fence tester is about $10 and worth it if you're not willing to test the fence with your hands. I check with my hands when I can, but I have some kind of resistance and I'm not always sure that there is a charge so I had to buy a tester once my kids got to be too old to bribe to check the fence for me! :)

And yes, some horses can tell if it's off or on. I think they hear the clicking. I had one horse that would graze under the fence once she realized the fence was off, but I swear if I had a mechanical clock nearby, she wouldn't have known. My other horse could care less if it's off or on. She just never has any inkling to go anywhere but where she is. What a good horse.

I guess that was more than 2 cents. Hope it helps.
Your 2 cents was very informative though! :D

I still need to get a grounding rod. So far I have the the insulators I need, and I am going to go with polywire for the fence. I do have a fence tester also. The charger I am still trying to figure out which one to get. The fenced in area will be about 125ft by 150ft.

I am going to remeasure tonight when I go to feed.
 

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We used 1 inch tape and those step in posts so we could move our horses are for grazing.. We did the two strands..Once they hit that tape and zap themselves the likely hood of the horse having the courage to "crawl under" is pretty low. the will just stay the heck away from it once they know it bites ( our was even grounded unknowingly for a week and the horses never tested it).. as for brand of tape I don't think that matters. BUT you will want to put your money into a good fencer. We bought one with a 15 mile range, that is made to fence off corn fields..and grass and sticks wont ground its zapping ability. I can not for the life of me think of the brand we bought, but your farm store people should be able to point you in the right direction. Ours was $100.
 

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The Blitzer is going to cover more miles of fence... but, I have never heard of that brand before so I won't say whether it's a good or bad fencer.
Gallagher is usually a pretty good brand. We had a Gallagher fencer that powered two quarter sections (320 acres) fenced and cross fenced. It would go up to 15 jewels of voltage. And boy did it ever hurt when I was soaking wet crawling under the fence (it was shorted somewhere so it was at 15 J), and touched my back on it! Threw me flat on my face! I've also so seen it drop a cow to her knees. It worked very well for the 6 years that we had it, then we moved and left it there. So I would recommend the Gallagher.
Looking forward to hearing the others comments!
 

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Originally Posted by Palomine
Flagging tape, hot pink or orange every so often so horse sees where fence is at is a good idea.

And if horse is TB? I would not do it as they do not do well with it, tend to get shocked, panic and run through it.
I've met loads of horse like this, not all TBs by a long shot (although I've met plenty TBs who jump it...). However pretty much all horses have more respect for the fence if you keep the strands taught, and don't let them get saggy. I think all the rest of the electric fencing basics has been covered...

I use electric fencing primarily as an inner ring of fencing inside my main post and wire fencing, and for strip grazing. It's also good as you can change gateways so that your gates don't end up knee deep in mud all the time...

One thing I will say is, you will at some point be electrocuted. Your horse might push you into it, or you'll try and climb under it, or you'll change a rug too close to the fence so that the surcingles hit it and you'll both get electrocuted, or you'll hold your gate latch in the same hand as your lead rope so it zaps both you and your horse, and gives your horse a fear of the gate for a few days... or maybe it's just me that things like this happen to -_-
 

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We use the Blitzer brand. No issues so far after we got a good grounding rod and the shorts to ground in the wire fixed. Nothing wrong with the charger.
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It is my opinion that tape is an over rated product. There are so many negatives to using it;-
  • Very prone to flapping in the wind and the metal filaments breaking because of that.
  • The electric filaments are arranged parallel so when one is broken it is not reconnected so is out of the equation from there on.
  • The surface area open to the sun is much greater than any other product (it is the UV rays in sunlight that breaks down plastic) so has to have a greater component of stabilising compound - the price goes up.
  • Tape is always more expensive.
  • The tape insulators are more expensive.
  • The tape tends to become knotted so looks ugly.
Rope is by far a better option as it negates all those objections.

The only advantage tape has is its perceived visibility and I feel at 6mm rope is just as visible as tape. Are horses really unable to see a fence? - There are plenty of authoritive trials to show that is not the case.
 

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I've done them all. You don't need to worry about visibility of you tag it with survey tape. Cut off a piece about a ft long and tie a simple knot and pull it tight. Not ever section between posts needs to be done, alternate is fine. The horse will memorize where the wire is so if the tape blows off it doesn't have to be replaced unless the wire is moved. Wire is cheaper and won't break in high winds whereas the ribbon may. If ribbon breaks just tie a knot in it, it will still work. You will have to buy insulators to suit the posts: and get the better ones as they are uv treated and last much longer. I have some that are 5 yrs old. You can get away with a single strand if she won't be on any snow. Then two strands are needed, a live and one to the ground post on the charger. This also has to go to a ground rod, a min. 3' length of steel rod driven into the ground. If the ground is very dry dribble a water against the rod so it seeps deeper into the dirt. If the pipe is hollow, fill it up a few times. A horse foolishly touches the wire with his nose, gets zapped then stays away from it. I have a single wire that hasn't been plugged in for two years but the horses don't go near it. It is their day only pasture when I am home.
 

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We use wooden posts in corners and at intervals where we are having to use electric tape as a more permanent thing - you can tighten it up much better so looks tidier and doesnt all blow away in a gale force wind!!!
 

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But, jaydee, I have read on the install instructions for tape that it is supposed to be a bit loose. It is not supposed to be tight. I think that tightening it up would be damaging to the tiny strands of wire.

Mine fences never "blow away," but they do definitely move in the wind. The movement is a nice "flag" for the horses to see as well.
 

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If you give the tape a couple of loose twists in between each post the wind can't catch it and it will help it last longer.
 

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We use wooden posts in corners and at intervals where we are having to use electric tape as a more permanent thing - you can tighten it up much better so looks tidier and doesnt all blow away in a gale force wind!!!
By doing that the fine metal filaments tend to break as the strength of the tape is dictated by the woven plastic strands. whether you twist the tape or not it will swing in the wind and does nothing to prevent the suns UV rays attacking the plastic.
 

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I didn't read everything, I just skimmed. It's my experience that the solar fencing doesn't work as well as the hard wired fencing. I know they sell based on distance, I believe my fencing was always within the guidelines. However one zap and the next zap is lesser, there just isn't the amount of charge stored in the box or something.

This wasn't my best subject at school, so I can't be scientific about it, maybe someone else can help me out.
 
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