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Hi, We are looking at a property of 10 acres and all the pastures have if I remember right, 3 strands of the 2" electric tape. The corners are wood posts and metel post in between, It looks very nice and is in very good shape. Just wondering what all of you think of this type of fencing? Is it exspensive to run, it is surely very visable to the horses. Thank you!
 

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We run electric fence, but we also have regular fence up. The electric keeps the horses from chewing up the wood posts.
My Dad used electric on our farm when I was a kid because we had a lot of land. He was always checking the lines to make sure nothing was touching them. Also, everytime it rain part of the fence would go out.
 

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Electric fences are very high maintenance and very difficult if you do not have experience with them. They are terribly unsafe perimeter fences; they are acceptable cross fences if they are very well maintained; and they are great to put on top of regular fences to keep horses from playing or fighting across the fences. It is imperative that you have a very good fence charger, keep it properly grounded and know how to keep it from 'shorting out'.

Electric fences have some very big enemies. Our biggest ones are deer and power outages. Others are wind storms that blow limbs down across them, rainy wet weather, tall grass or weeds near them, new horses that are not used to them, and many others.
 

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We use all electric at our current facility. It's 2" tape with 3 strands of aluminum covered wire below it. It works very well. The horses respect it and it doesn't look bad either. It's very affordable to run. If you find the electric bill high, you can buy solar powered chargers. They can be pricey to buy, but you don't have to worry about power outages or a higher electric bill. We're moving to a new location and will have solar chargers for our fencing. They have an internal battery that stores 2 weeks worth of juice should we go through a cloudy period. You can buy spare batteries to keep charged should you have more days of clouds than that, but I have never had that problem when I used solar charges in the past.

We have had very good luck using it at our current facility. We keep the ground under the fence sprayed with weed killer. As long as you keep the fence line clear, you use good insulators, and your corner posts are solid with good corner insulators, then electric fences are easy to maintain are very secure. Electric fences in wooded areas, areas with dense or fast growing vegitation, or on larger properties can be a real pain in the rear and hard to deal with. But electric on small to medium sized horse properties in good pasture areas are relatively easy to maintain.

You will want to inspect the tape to check for cracking or splitting. Ask the property owners how long it has been up and which brand it is. Most will have a UV rating for 2 to 5 years. After that, the tape will start to break down and may need to be replaced. Some products last longer. You will need to research it to see.
 

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We have split rail in the back pastures, split rail with electric wire in the main dirt pasture, and non-hooked up electric tape for the round pen and riding ring. The tape holds up really well, but obviously in our rings they aren't electrified for obvious reasons. The connectors always break, though, which I hate.
 

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Electric fences are very high maintenance and very difficult if you do not have experience with them. They are terribly unsafe perimeter fences; they are acceptable cross fences if they are very well maintained; and they are great to put on top of regular fences to keep horses from playing or fighting across the fences. It is imperative that you have a very good fence charger, keep it properly grounded and know how to keep it from 'shorting out'.

Electric fences have some very big enemies. Our biggest ones are deer and power outages. Others are wind storms that blow limbs down across them, rainy wet weather, tall grass or weeds near them, new horses that are not used to them, and many others.

Sorry but I do not agree.......we moved to our place 10 years ago and I had no experience with electrical fencing........I had the electrician hook up the charger and the first ground rod. We have 4.5 acres fenced off in Electrobraid with tons of interior fencing done with electric tape......I installed 95% of it myself including digging and installing all the posts.

Maintenance is minimal...once year make sure the Electrobraid is tight, replace broken clips as needed, we either weed wack or do round up under the fence line.

Our new horses are introduced to electric in a small gravel paddock attached to their stall.....we walk new horses around the perimeter and then just let them go......one touch and they firgure it out.

There are a few simple principles that you need to know about electric fencing but it is not rocket science.






Super Nova
 

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Sorry but I do not agree.......we moved to our place 10 years ago and I had no experience with electrical fencing........I had the electrician hook up the charger and the first ground rod. We have 4.5 acres fenced off in Electrobraid with tons of interior fencing done with electric tape......I installed 95% of it myself including digging and installing all the posts.

Maintenance is minimal...once year make sure the Electrobraid is tight, replace broken clips as needed, we either weed wack or do round up under the fence line.

Our new horses are introduced to electric in a small gravel paddock attached to their stall.....we walk new horses around the perimeter and then just let them go......one touch and they firgure it out.

There are a few simple principles that you need to know about electric fencing but it is not rocket science.






Super Nova
I agree with this. In the summer we put up a temporary electric fence so the horses can be grazed on the lawn. The hardest part is teaching guests not to touch it.
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Ha! You're nicer than me. I let people touch it. I'm so tired of people hanging on my fences (and stretching them out) that I stopped telling them if it was on or off. They have no reason to touch them anyways or to be in the pasture without my permission or supervision.

I LOVE your set up Super Nova. I'd like to buy a property in the next 1 1/2 years or so and I've been daydreaming (a little premature I know) about how I'll set up my barn/stalls/paddocks/pastures. That gives me some good ideas about the barn/paddock areas.
 

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Ha! You're nicer than me. I let people touch it. I'm so tired of people hanging on my fences (and stretching them out) that I stopped telling them if it was on or off. They have no reason to touch them anyways or to be in the pasture without my permission or supervision.

I LOVE your set up Super Nova. I'd like to buy a property in the next 1 1/2 years or so and I've been daydreaming (a little premature I know) about how I'll set up my barn/stalls/paddocks/pastures. That gives me some good ideas about the barn/paddock areas.
Thank you ........its been a labor of love.....here are some more pics for you to drool over and give you some ideas.

Some of my pastures and a corner of my ring.


My round pen


Another pasture pic

 

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Properly installed electric fencing is very safe and very functional.
 

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Wow Super Nova, love your set up! I hope you don't mind, I saved your pictures for future reference. We're moving to a new place and I need ideas on parceling up the pasture for the rotation etc. Any more pictures of it? How to you avoid mud around your barn areas? It looks like you have some gravel in the shot of the horse eating under the fence.
 

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Wow Super Nova, love your set up! I hope you don't mind, I saved your pictures for future reference. We're moving to a new place and I need ideas on parceling up the pasture for the rotation etc. Any more pictures of it? How to you avoid mud around your barn areas? It looks like you have some gravel in the shot of the horse eating under the fence.

All my paddocks are all weather gravel.......the only mushy area is just out side their stalls but that is only while it is raining within 12 hours of the rain stopping all puddles have dried up.

I did post a picture of the entire gravel paddocks that are attached to the barn.....maybe you missed that one?

I will see if I can find and over all picture........or see if I can post a google map so you can see our place from the air.

Super Nova
 

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I couldn't quite tell what was on the ground of your paddocks on my computer. My monitor must be fuzzy. That's a very good use of space. We have so many trees on our place, the grass isn't going to grow as nice as yours... And they make it a bit hard to split things up. The trees are nice for shade though! We get some nasty hot summers here.
 

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I suppose they are fine if you have a small place. We have 80 acres on the home-place and 160 acres leased. Most of our electric fences cross/fence large pastures so they can be grazed more efficiently. We have creeks, trees, brush, lots of deer and even have feral hogs to deal with. We have frequent wind storms and infrequent tornados and big storms. We also have frequent power outages. So, they are constant maintenance problems.

I can see that small farms with paddocks away from trees and wild game would be easy compared to fences here. In western Oklahoma and Texas it is not unusual for ranchers to have 1200 acres or bigger winter wheat pastures in one field with nothing but electric fences to keep the cattle in. Again, they have to be driven and checked daily because deer or drunk drivers are bad to take them out.
 
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